Clarification on difference of motherboards.

Discussion in 'Buying Tips and Advice' started by rans0m00, Sep 8, 2010.

  1. rans0m00 macrumors 6502

    Joined:
    Jun 21, 2010
    #1
    So not trying to do install mac os on my pc but from what I have heard on Apple computers there is a chip on the motherboard the operating system checks for to allow you to install/run mac os.... Is this true and if so what is the name of the chip?
     
  2. r.j.s Moderator emeritus

    r.j.s

    Joined:
    Mar 7, 2007
    Location:
    Texas
    #2
    Not exactly.

    OS X requires EFI to boot, rather than BIOS.
     
  3. rans0m00 thread starter macrumors 6502

    Joined:
    Jun 21, 2010
    #3
    So no separate chip just a different version of what a avg pc user would call a bios?
     
  4. r.j.s Moderator emeritus

    r.j.s

    Joined:
    Mar 7, 2007
    Location:
    Texas
    #4
    Well ... EFI is a different chip than BIOS. They are not interchangeable.
     
  5. rans0m00 thread starter macrumors 6502

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    Jun 21, 2010
  6. r.j.s Moderator emeritus

    r.j.s

    Joined:
    Mar 7, 2007
    Location:
    Texas
    #6
    No, Apple motherboards do not have a BIOS. They use EFI.
     
  7. rans0m00 thread starter macrumors 6502

    Joined:
    Jun 21, 2010
    #7
    Ok think I have an understanding of it now. Thank you for answering my questions.
     
  8. RedReplicant macrumors 6502a

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    Mar 31, 2010
  9. maflynn Moderator

    maflynn

    Staff Member

    Joined:
    May 3, 2009
    Location:
    Boston
    #9
    I agree with others, starting your research at insanelymac is the first order of business. You'll gain lots of information of what works and what doesn't.

    Basically, OSX is written with a specific set of hardware, i.e., audio, video, memory controllers, etc. Apple controls how the motherboard is assembled and what components go on the motherboard.

    Making a hackintosh basically involves finding a motherboard that has similar components so the default kexts (device drivers) will work without modification. Of course there's not too many motherboards that mirror apple's so custom kexts are required.

    To further complicate the matter is that PCs (99.99%) use BIOS, a legacy method for the OS to interact with the hardware (its the layer that sits between the hardware and the OS). Microsoft and Intel developed a BIOS replacement called EFI. Its more extensible and flexible (I guess). Apple embraced this, so this now complicates turning a PC with BIOS into a hackintosh. We use a custom bootloader to kick start the OSX booting process.

    I created a core i7-930 hackintosh, and while the actual act of loading OSX onto it was not complicated, finding the specific components were a bit tricky, for instance, I thought my motherboard was compatible, but later I found I should have bought the "deluxe" version not the non-deluxe version. This meant I had more work to find a process that would actually work, which I eventually did.

    Choosing your components wisely will make the process of creating a hackintosh much easier.
     

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