Cleaning Dust In Vents!

Discussion in 'iMac' started by Zav, Feb 25, 2013.

  1. Zav macrumors member

    Joined:
    Jan 3, 2013
    #1
    My Mac is a 2011 Model as listed in my sig. I searched the forums but found no definitive answer. Obviously ripping the thing apart is the ideal way to rid it of horrible dust, but is there not a more simple way you guys do this? I've seen hovers being taken to them in a rather fearless fashion, also compressed air and just simple lens cleaning brushes. Which one do you use? Or do you use something entirely different?

    I do a fair bit of gaming and just want to keep the dust at bay as to not increase the core temp even more.
     
  2. gzigoris macrumors member

    gzigoris

    Joined:
    Feb 6, 2013
    Location:
    Middle MI.USA
    #2
    Gentle reminder. Don't ever blow air into your Mac or for that matter any PC unless you have it all apart. Vacuum the thing. Suck the air OUT. If you can get it apart then you can do a better job but if you blow the dust into it you are going to get dust in places that you don't want.

    George
     
  3. Macman45 macrumors demi-god

    Macman45

    Joined:
    Jul 29, 2011
    Location:
    Somewhere Back In The Long Ago
    #3
  4. TrboMac macrumors regular

    TrboMac

    Joined:
    Aug 8, 2012
    Location:
    NC/USA
    #4
    I posed this question in a thread. A while ago I vacuumed my iMac and it went beserk. It's best to use an antistatic vacuum. Some people do propose canned air, but I agree w/ the previous poster; seems that it would push dust in.

    Since having the issue in my thread, I've made sure to power off my iMac and vacuum it once/every other week. It won't collect as much dust as a laptop or PC w/ the tower on the ground, but some will get in there.
     
  5. gCloud macrumors 6502a

    Joined:
    Mar 9, 2012
    Location:
    United Federation of Planets
    #5
    Strange I've been vacuuming my electronics for years. My Dog (RIP) really hated it thou.
     
  6. TrboMac macrumors regular

    TrboMac

    Joined:
    Aug 8, 2012
    Location:
    NC/USA
    #6
    I think the issue was that it interfered w/ bluetooth. The blinking green light on my keyboard seems to back that up. It's still probably best to use an antistatic vacuum around electronics, although I still use my regular one, power off the computer, and vacuum the lower grill plate.
     
  7. smoking monkey macrumors 65816

    smoking monkey

    Joined:
    Mar 5, 2008
    Location:
    You Only Live Twice
    #7
    I think it's always best to turn off and unplug everything and then vacuum electronics.
     
  8. Zav thread starter macrumors member

    Joined:
    Jan 3, 2013
    #8
    Can't seem to be able to find an antistatic vacuum without spending a ridiculous amount of cash. Since its sole purpose will be for hoovering my iMac, I don't want to be spending so much.
     
  9. TrboMac macrumors regular

    TrboMac

    Joined:
    Aug 8, 2012
    Location:
    NC/USA
    #9
    After reading my thread I took some helpful info, as you can, and decide for yourself. I'm using my regular vacuum, shutting down/unplugging, and vacuuming the lower grill and my desk once/every other week.

    Seems to be working so far. Oh, and I move the keyboard/mouse as the bluetooth connection went beserk the first time. Not sure if static made that happen or not.
     
  10. :3AfroGato~ macrumors newbie

    Joined:
    Feb 26, 2013
    Location:
    Bolivia
    #10
    What type of vacum would be best? I have a mac mini and I wonder if it could get damaged by the strength of the vacum.
     
  11. FreemanW macrumors 6502

    Joined:
    Sep 10, 2012
    Location:
    The Real Northern California
    #11
    Good grief . . .

    Vacuums create static electricity, that has no place anywhere near integrated circuit boards and sensitive electronics.

    The only effective way to clean dust from interior computer space is by opening that space up, preventing fans from spinning, and using an air-stream to blow the dust off of components.

    I routinely clean the computers that I service. I use a air compressor. Fans are one of the places that corners are cut to maintain margins. They usually do not have sealed bearings.

    When you clean a computer or a Power Supply Unit with compressed air, you must prevent the fan(s) from spinning. You do not want to over-speed the fan and burn the bearings. You also do not want to allow the fan to spin while there is debris in the air-stream passing over the fan, this debris will find its way into the racings. If the fan is spinning, the debris will become part of the bearing/racing assembly and the fan will never be the same.

    The only thorough method for cleaning a computer is to open it and have access to the innards. It is not what the OP wants to hear, Hell, it isn't what I want to hear, but that is the truth.

    ----------

    When using a vacuum, just remember, the second component to be sucked off of the circuit board voids the warranty. :D

    Just use a Sears 16 Gal shop-vac. :D:D
     
  12. eldho macrumors member

    Joined:
    Aug 16, 2011
    #12
    How about regularly closing the computer down and vacuuming and dusting the room, especially around the computer. Best to avoid the dust getting there as much as possible in the first place. The point about closing the computer while vacuuming is particularly important as vacuuming and dusting of course stirs dust into the air for a while and you do not want the computer to be sucking air in at that time.
     
  13. Zav thread starter macrumors member

    Joined:
    Jan 3, 2013
    #13
    I'll look into that mate, thank you.

    Yeah I constantly keep the area around my iMac spotless, and the screen and aluminium chassis of it to. My my efforts are futile when it comes to the innards of the computer. I thought that would be obvious.



    This was my worst fear, how can there not be a more feasible way to clean it? It's not like a can't open it, i'd just prefer not too. Also, not every Tom, Dick and Harry has the confidence, or the ability to open their machines up.
     
  14. AppleNewton macrumors 68000

    AppleNewton

    Joined:
    Apr 3, 2007
    Location:
    1 Finite Place
    #14
    compressed air is fine, an air compressor is also fine -- just turn down the psi so you dont damage any of the components.

    Vacuums can work, but arent always effective...if you do use a vacuum, get an ESD anti-static vacuum safe for electronics.


    with the pre-2012 iMacs, dust from the bottom can get in through the vents between the glass and LCD, if you look for iMac roller or iMac sticky roller you can easily clean the glass and lcd of your iMac as well.
     
  15. eldho macrumors member

    Joined:
    Aug 16, 2011
    #15
    I didn't mean to be offensive. I am surprised that you have a problem with dust inside the computer when you keep the area around your computer free of dust. I am not aware of having any dust problems myself but then I guess I do not play games which get the fans going hard and sucking a lot of air in. I hope you find a good solution:)
     
  16. GermanyChris macrumors 601

    GermanyChris

    Joined:
    Jul 3, 2011
    Location:
    Here
    #16
    No matter how clean you are dust will happen you inhabit the area..
     

Share This Page