Clearing the RAM, difference??

Discussion in 'iOS 9' started by Simacca, Dec 19, 2015.

  1. Simacca macrumors 6502a

    Simacca

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    #1
    Has anyone noticed any difference if you clear the ram from your device by holding down the power button until the 'slide to power off' appears then hold down the home button in combination with the power button until the springboard appears?

    I notice my iPhone 6s feels snappier again, but not sure if I am imagining it. Just wondering why other people think.

    This ram clearing is only available on iOS 9 and higher.
     
  2. Polaroid macrumors 6502a

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    #2
    I do when mine goes a bit sluggish and helps
     
  3. rijc99 macrumors 6502a

    rijc99

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    #3
    I do it when the transition animations stop working. Or when there is behavior that isn't normal.

    Rebooting seems to correct a lot issues in my experience.
     
  4. Max(IT) Suspended

    Max(IT)

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    #4
    That is a sort of reset of your device. I wouldn't do that on a regular basis....
    What I'm doing is to reboot my iDevices once in a while by turning them off and the plug in to charge (that turn them on again). I'm doing that every 3-5 days.
     
  5. Simacca thread starter macrumors 6502a

    Simacca

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    #5
    I wouldn't class it as a reset. It just clears the ram. I haven't noticed any ill effects. It's also a lot quicker than rebooting or a hard reset.

    I shall see how it goes.
     
  6. Max(IT) Suspended

    Max(IT)

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    #6
    Yes, it is much quicker because not all of the processes involved in the powering down and booting up of the device are completed. This is the very reason I wouldn't do that on a regular basis...
     
  7. Sonnto macrumors member

    Sonnto

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    #7
    I've done it twice just to make sure there wasn't any unknown processes gobbling up battery. However, I probably won't do it ever again (just like how I never swipe apps away) so it doesn't have to reload everything back into memory from scratch. I only did it to see if it really works which it did and the second time was me testing it again lol. Other than that, I won't do it again. It didn't really make too big of a difference for me either. But that's my personal experience with it.
     
  8. KALLT macrumors 601

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    Sep 23, 2008
    #8
    It is a reset function and not meant to be used constantly. You have no control over the system processes and memory management to measure what this does to your device longterm. Sometimes, I wonder whether the reason for people’s problems with the phone or Mac are due to misguided experiments like these. Just restart your phone normally once in a while if it makes you feel better, but other than that there isn’t much you can do, aside from cutting back in app-usage.
     
  9. cebixd macrumors regular

    cebixd

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    #9
    Its works on iOS 8 too
     
  10. imagineadam macrumors 6502a

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    #10
    The truth is that once your ram is full and you open a new app (not loaded into ram) that said app will take a little bit longer to load since iOS needs to quickly clear out an app or process or two to load the new app. If you are starting from scratch with free ram that app will load at full throttle not having to close out any other apps or processes.

    But say you want to switch to an app that's already in ram it's faster since it's already loaded into the ram.

    With all of that said you really shouldn't notice hardly any difference because the (A6 and up) chips are so fast and reloading apps has been plenty speedy for me. Sometimes I'll close out all of the apps in the switcher which is essentially the same thing as the power off and home button trick if my device seems to be a little sluggish. I'm thinking once and awhile some app will hang on to too much ram or have a memory leak and it takes iOS a little longer to free up the memory. But most of the time I just let things be and everything is plenty fast since these processors and ram keep getting better and better! Especially if you have a 6S! I'd say it's only really noticeable and beneficial to people still rocking a 4S and below to clear out the ram. I've had a 4 a 5 and now a 6. My 2 cents.
     
  11. MEJHarrison macrumors 6502a

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    #11
    To flesh out what Max said a little...

    It's the equivalent off turning off your computer by pulling the plug from the wall. It should ONLY be used when it's absolutely necessary. It is absolutely an unsafe practice to do on a regular basis. Do a normal reboot instead.
     
  12. gordon1234 macrumors 6502a

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    #12
    Yes, I think we should make a list of the people who admit to doing this regularly, and see how many of them are also frequent posters in the "lag and stutter", "crapdate" "Apple is going downhill", etc threads. Doing this may leave your filesystem in an inconsistent state, corrupt application settings, and any number of other bad things. You should only do it if you can't restart the device the right way (which lets everything shut down gracefully.)
     
  13. lolkthxbai macrumors 65816

    lolkthxbai

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    #13
    That's usually what you do when you want to quit an app. Force quitting is swiping up from the app switcher.
     
  14. C DM macrumors Westmere

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    Oct 17, 2011
    #14
    Quitting an app is swiping it up from the app switcher while force quitting it using the method that was mentioned in this thread while you are in an app (at least that's how it's generally been described). That said, what this thread refrences is doing that while not being in an app (basically while being on the home screen).
     
  15. William Wales macrumors member

    William Wales

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    #15
    Clearing the ram by this way has a good result, but it may have little effect after you reboot your iPhone for several hours. It is a reset function and I think it is not a good way to take every time.
     
  16. TL24 macrumors 6502a

    TL24

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    #16
    Let iOS manage your ram, I've had 20+ apps opened and never experienced any slowness on my 6S+.
     
  17. stooovie macrumors 6502a

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    #17
    It may help before loading a big app. The OS is capable of managing it dynamically, but sometimes it may be faster to just free the memory in one fell swoop, in advance. Do not use it constantly, there's no point. You wouldn't clean your entire house after each meal.
     
  18. oldmacs macrumors 68040

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    #18
    I don't care what Apple meant for it to do, but it certainly helps sort out issues with my devices when iOS 9 (frequently) gets buggy.
     
  19. KALLT macrumors 601

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    Sep 23, 2008
    #19
    As opposed to a normal restart? I suppose you have thoroughly tested what happens on your device to make such a judgment? Allowing services to shut down gracefully is always preferred over a forced reset.
     
  20. oldmacs, Dec 31, 2015
    Last edited: Dec 31, 2015

    oldmacs macrumors 68040

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    #20
    I get a much better improvement from a ram reset than a restart.. It fixes jittering animations and random other things.

    I do it every couple of days or whenever my devices get nasty (I turn them on and off all the time anyway). The only other way I found to get the same result is doing a settings reset, and clearing the ram is faster and easier.

    At the end of the day, I back my devices up so if anything ever goes wrong, I will restore from a backup.
     
  21. nightcap965 macrumors 6502a

    nightcap965

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    #21
    Some people just have to feel like they're doing *something*. I had a neighbor who used to call me every time his computer hiccuped. He firmly believed that defragging the disk on a weekly basis improved performance. Even if it did, it would have only been measurable in nanoseconds.
     
  22. Rhonindk macrumors 68020

    Rhonindk

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    #22
    Wish that was all true :(. I have run into a few apps that Apple's RAM management does a poor job with. most noticeable for me is watch TWC on my device. Very frequently the load circle just spins forever until you kill it and clear the ram then relaunch. Have a few memory intensive apps like that. It has gotten much better on my 6S+ due to the added RAM.
    Still, Apple needs to improve their management process.
     
  23. Rhonindk macrumors 68020

    Rhonindk

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    #23
    No but I do clean my kitchen and dining room or kitchen and office after I eat (depending on local) :D
     
  24. KALLT macrumors 601

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    #24
    It is not the memory management of the system, it is the poor, poor state of some of these applications. Developers can actually screw up the state restoration and response to the system’s memory management. This is why a reset works in these cases, because it forces the app to reload from scratch. This is precisely the point I am making: you do not know what happens inside of the system, you seem to assume that the system itself is at fault and that a reset, a tool which Apple provides for exceptional use cases, is supposed to fix shoddy programming.

    Do what you want, but by forcing-resetting the system memory just for that one program, you are cracking a nut with a sledgehammer and do not know which other parts of the system are affected by this on a long-term basis.

    I really doubt that a reset is the solution for that. Are you sure that you are not just overburdening your system with too many apps at once? You do know that applications can run in the background for a limited time and that apps like Music and Facebook are notorious for affecting the system as a whole. As I said above, applications can be poorly programmed and can affect the system beyond their active state.
     
  25. stooovie macrumors 6502a

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    #25
    You cannot overburden the OS with apps, and you cannot not do the same. It's simply not your task to manage running apps (as would be with traditional desktop OS) and you should only force-quit one or all apps when there's an issue.
     

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