Cloning my HDD (for a new SSD)

Discussion in 'MacBook Pro' started by Sylte, Jan 4, 2013.

  1. Sylte, Jan 4, 2013
    Last edited: Jan 4, 2013

    Sylte macrumors newbie

    Joined:
    Jan 4, 2013
    #1
    Hi guys!
    I've decided to upgrade the HHD in my late 2011 MBP to a SSD. I have just recieved my Corsair Sata 3 GT 240gb and will be cloning my HDD over the weekend. I have never cloned nor changed a HDD in a MBP before, but I will follow the steps in this guide;

    https://discussions.apple.com/docs/DOC-4122

    I think the guide is pretty good, but there's a few questions I would like to ask just to get the whole process down as smooth as possible. First of all I was wondering if need to change anything like you would do in the BIOS on a windows machine?

    And after I have used CCC to clone and switch etc, will I need to format my old HDD before using it as an external drive (with a case) or can I just plug it in and use it straight off the bat?

    EDIT: If I want to do a clean installation instead of cloning, will I then have to repurchase apps through appstore and the Microsoft Office package?

    If someone could shed some light on this, or just give me some general tips on the whole process I would be really grateful!
     
  2. GGJstudios macrumors Westmere

    GGJstudios

    Joined:
    May 16, 2008
    #2
    Here's a simple approach:
    1. Buy an external enclosure and put your old drive in it.
    2. Install your new drive in your Mac.
    3. Boot from your old (external) drive by holding the Option key on startup.
    4. Use Carbon Copy Cloner to clone the old (external) drive to the new (internal) drive.
    5. Boot from the new internal drive.
    6. Your now running on your new internal drive and your old drive is now an external drive, useful for backups or additional storage.
     
  3. hakuin macrumors regular

    Joined:
    Jul 30, 2010
    #3
    To answer the first question, you will not need to format your old HDD before using it as an external drive. You can just put the HDD in the external caddy, connect it to a USB port, and it should be detected by the OS. If it does not appear in Finder after connecting, try looking for it in Disk Utility.

    Sorry, I don't know the answer to your apps question.
     
  4. mobilehaathi macrumors G3

    mobilehaathi

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    #4
    You can re-download apps from the store once you log in with your ID.

    I have no idea about MS Office.
     
  5. freduke macrumors newbie

    Joined:
    Jan 4, 2013
    #5
    Hi I am also in the process of cloning my old hard drive to my new 512gb ssd. I'm not that mac/tech savvy to say the least so I don't know what to do after it clones.

    I can now boot up the laptop from the ssd? Do I have to delete everything on my old drive in order to just have my media and such on the hard drive? Do I have to move itunes to the hard drive in order for it to play my music? Wouldn't it be faster for the application to be on the ssd and then have it retrieve the song from the hard drive?

    sorry for the noob questions :eek:
     
  6. bushido Suspended

    bushido

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    Mar 26, 2008
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    Germany
    #6
    cloning? why dont u guys just use timecapsule?

    anyway, theres no need to delete the hdd to use it external
     
  7. Weaselboy Moderator

    Weaselboy

    Staff Member

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    Jan 23, 2005
    Location:
    California
    #7
    Yes, once you have all your data off the HDD you would want to erase it so the old OS and apps are not taking up space there. Afterward, you would want to leave all apps on the SSD. You can keep your music only on the external HDD if you like, but iTunes app itself would stay on the SSD.
     
  8. justperry macrumors 604

    justperry

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    #8
    Because a clone has one advantage over TimeMachine, a clone will boot and a TimeMachine will not.

    And a Time Capsule is more expensive than a normal External HD.
     
  9. bushido Suspended

    bushido

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    #9
    sorry i meant Time Machine not Time Capsule
     
  10. justperry macrumors 604

    justperry

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    #10
    No worries.

    There is another reason a Clone is better, it will not create local backups on the Mac, and if you have only 128 GB like on an Air space is precious.

    TimeMachine is for "Dummies".
     
  11. GGJstudios macrumors Westmere

    GGJstudios

    Joined:
    May 16, 2008
    #11
    As stated, Time Machine cannot make bootable clones. That means you'd have to reinstall the OS and then restore from your TM backup, whereas with CCC, you simply boot up from the cloned backup.
     
  12. KPOM macrumors G5

    Joined:
    Oct 23, 2010
    #12
    Whether you clone your drive or do a clean installation, Microsoft Office may prompt you to reactivate since it will detect that it is on a new drive. Make sure you have your product key handy. I recently purchased a new Mac (more below) and needed to find the printout of the e-mail with the product key so I could re-activate it. (I almost made the mistake of simply saving the e-mail with the key on my hard drive, which I couldn't open up since it was an Outlook e-mail and I couldn't open Outlook because it asked for an activation key. :mad: I now have the product key saved elsewhere).

    Time Machine is a great secondary backup solution. While I clone my drives regularly to an external drive, it is nice having a Time Capsule in the background. I recently lost my 2012 MacBook Air while traveling (Find My Mac "found" and erased it in an airport but no one ever turned it in). I had it insured, and used the proceeds to buy the 13" rMBP. While I had a clone backup, it was about a month old, so I wound up using Migration Assistant to restore from my Time Capsule anyway, and my new Mac was right back to where the old one was the night before I left for the airport.

    CCC and Time Machine are a great backup combination. I used Migration Assistant from the cloned drive first (it took 12 minutes to restore from my Seagate Thunderbolt drive), created a new login, and then used Migration Assistant to restore my existing account from my Time Capsule over Ethernet. That took another hour or so. Had I simply migrated from Time Capsule alone it would have taken over 12 hours as I had about 70GB to copy over.
     
  13. Weaselboy Moderator

    Weaselboy

    Staff Member

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    #13
    The local backups created by Time Machine do not detract from space available to the user for storage. If the OS sees you require more storage it will shrink the local backups.

    From here:

    No you don't. Since Lion you can put in a new, blank disk and boot to a local (USB) TM backup and format the disk and do a full restore of the OS and data without first installing the OS.

    The only downside to TM is one cannot run from the TM backup, but it will do a full restore including the OS just like CCC would. Arguably, TM is simpler and offers more options such as picking a point in time to restore from.
     
  14. justperry macrumors 604

    justperry

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    #14
    Thanks for the information Weaselboy, didn't know this.

    So, if I understand correctly you more or less boot from the TM backup but without the full OS X experience, just an emergency boot lets say and it will allow you to erase and install on the internal disk?
    If this is the case TM is more capable than I initially thought.
     
  15. Weaselboy Moderator

    Weaselboy

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    #15
    You bet. :)

    Exactly. Since Lion 10.7.2, what happens is the first TM backup puts a copy of Recovery HD on the TM external drive. So if you option key boot and select the TM drive you will see what looks exactly like the normal Recovery HD screen with all the same functionality to format and restore.
     
  16. darkloki macrumors member

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    Jan 26, 2012
    Location:
    Orange County California
    #16
    I'm not a professional about the Mac Operation System, but I do know alot about Windows 7 and i know that the newer versions of OSx supports this thing called TRIM, and if you are unsure what Trim is here: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/TRIM


    But anyways, carbon copying will not be utilizing Trim as far as I know and thus you would be reducing the life of your SSD :eek:
     

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