Cloud-Free Setup

drthom

macrumors newbie
Original poster
Jun 10, 2017
12
2
USA
I've seen this topic addressed on other threads but the discussions are either dated or not iMac specific. I'd like some advice so I can at least get off to a clean start.

I have ordered a fancy new iMac: i9, 8GB, Vega 48, and 512SSD.

I want to avoid "Cloud-Anythings" as they offer no value to me, but do enable additional privacy/security vulnerabilities. I realize that there are many other vulnerabilities to worry about, but I'd like to at least eliminate those associated with the cloud. I expressly do not want any of my data, info, files, or syncing to sneak onto the cloud.

So... I am pulling my new iMac out of its box... How should I precede so as to have no relationship whatsoever with any cloud anywhere?
 

mikehalloran

macrumors 68000
Oct 14, 2018
1,602
392
The Sillie Con Valley
Don’t set up iCloud. You can skip this during the setup procedure. If you have any iOS devices, they won’t be able to talk to your new iMac to share such services as Notes, Calendars, Reminders, Email etc. but there’s nothing that says you must. You can sync such services through an IMAP email account instead of iCloud.

Avoid GMail, Dropbox, Kindle and any other cloud based service. A bit inconvenient but doable.

You will need to register your new iMac with your iTunes/App Store account. Apple uses this info for warranty and support as well as software updates.
 

drthom

macrumors newbie
Original poster
Jun 10, 2017
12
2
USA
Don’t set up iCloud. You can skip this during the setup procedure. If you have any iOS devices, they won’t be able to talk to your new iMac to share such services as Notes, Calendars, Reminders, Email etc. but there’s nothing that says you must. You can sync such services through an IMAP email account instead of iCloud.

Avoid GMail, Dropbox, Kindle and any other cloud based service. A bit inconvenient but doable.

You will need to register your new iMac with your iTunes/App Store account. Apple uses this info for warranty and support as well as software updates.
[doublepost=1554370817][/doublepost]That easy? I'm embarrassed. Thanks for the info!

Tom
 

Fishrrman

macrumors P6
Feb 20, 2009
17,398
5,631
Rule #1:
DON'T sign into iCloud.

Rule #2:
DON'T let the OS "manage" your drives. Do that YOURSELF.

Rule #3:
Create and maintain multiple backups.
Multiple CLONED backups are the best of all.
Use either CarbonCopyCloner or SuperDuper to do this.
 
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drthom

macrumors newbie
Original poster
Jun 10, 2017
12
2
USA
Rule #1:
DON'T sign into iCloud.

Rule #2:
DON'T let the OS "manage" your drives. Do that YOURSELF.

Rule #3:
Create and maintain multiple backups.
Multiple CLONED backups are the best of all.
Use either CarbonCopyCloner or SuperDuper to do this.
Wow, F-man, thanks! You're so right!

I was going to ask questions about rules 2 and 3, but decided to erase, reformat, and reinstall (or whatever the correct word is) a WD MyPassport drive using my current, snail-paced Mini. Most went without event, but as soon as I tried one of the MyPasport utilities there were lots of references to the cloud and syncing -- the utility would not run unless I specifically gave it permission to access/use those things!

Thanks again,

Tom
 

mikehalloran

macrumors 68000
Oct 14, 2018
1,602
392
The Sillie Con Valley
Multiple CLONED backups are the best of all.
Use either CarbonCopyCloner or SuperDuper to do this.
Nothing best about that since it is absolutely unnecessary.

Multiple Time Machine backups work perfectly well. Over ethernet or wireless is easiest. Set and forget. Hope you never have to use them to restore but, if you do, very easy. Unlike so-called "cloned" copies, you can get Apple Support on the phone if you need assistance.
[doublepost=1554406397][/doublepost]
MyPasport utilities there were lots of references to the cloud and syncing -- the utility would not run unless I specifically gave it permission to access/use those things!
You do not need any of that nonsense unless you intend to access it over the internet. WD Passports, My Clouds etc. can be configured as straight Time Machine. It's one of the default settings and WD has phone support, too.

I use the WD My Cloud Mirror over ethernet set up as JBOD so that the drives alternate hourly for Time Machine. No NAS, Cloud, special utilities etc. Like ol' Ron Popiel, I "set and forget".

https://www.wd.com/products/personal-cloud-storage.html
 

drthom

macrumors newbie
Original poster
Jun 10, 2017
12
2
USA
Thanks, Mike-H, for your advice. I'm afraid my last post might have been confusing. I am a pretty naive user.

My screwing around with the MyPassport drive was purely experimental. Since I did not understand F-man's #2 and #3 recommendations, I pulled out this portable drive that had been sitting in a drawer for some time and tried to make it work. The files it contained were no longer valuable to me, so it provided an opportunity for experimentation.

What I learned was this: In the process of installing/formatting the drive I had to navigate through a series of options that I did not understand. Since i had no experience with syncing and clouding, the choices I was forced to make made little sense to me, and opened a door to unwelcomed privacy/security threats.

I think I have learned from this thread. I think that I can set up my iMac without any cloud madness. I am pretty confident that I can plug in an external drive and activate Time Machine and get good backupsl

So, hopefully, when my fancy new iMac arrives, I can be a much more "Shrewder McGruder," and sidestep those creepy external links.

Tom