CNET Says All In One Desktops may replace standard Desktops

Discussion in 'Apple, Inc and Tech Industry' started by k2spitfire88, Apr 28, 2009.

  1. k2spitfire88 macrumors 6502

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    #1
    http://news.cnet.com/8301-17938_105-10228435-1.html

    Pretty interesting article. My question to you all is, is this due to Apple and the iMac, or did that at least encourage it? Also, do you think these will replace standalone desktops for Standard Consumers (not Macrumors members)?
     
  2. PlaceofDis macrumors Core

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    #2
    i don't think Apple is the sole reason for this, as usual, the answer is much more complex than that. i think the fact that computing power has caught up and is - for a lot of average people - beyond powerful enough for everyday needs such as web browsing, email, word, etc, that upgrading your tower is less and less needed, and seeing how well done an AIO can look and function (Apple) i think has helped push people too. that, and computer prices have come down so much that even with an AIO, when it's time to upgrade its not a huge cost to replace everything, as thats what most people do anyways.

    /end rant.
     
  3. k2spitfire88 thread starter macrumors 6502

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    #3
    Yea, I didn't make myself clear, I meant did Apple and the iMac help push the industry this way. Thanks for the response
     
  4. BittenApple macrumors 6502a

    BittenApple

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    #4
    Even before the iMac, Apple was pushing all in ones. Does anyone remember the classic all in ones, or perhaps the LC/Performa/PowerMac lines of all in ones?

    Apple's influence spreads more than the last 12 years.
     
  5. k2spitfire88 thread starter macrumors 6502

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    #5
    I actually forgot about those. I was a Windows guy until a few years ago when I began to get interested in Apple's products. I do remember those old AIO's now that you mention it though.
     
  6. nickane macrumors 6502

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    #6
    Desktops AIOs will only dominate if they offer expansion slots. Only apple fans are fervent enough to put up with planned obsolescence (at a premium no less). After 4 years with a gfx card that was 3 years out of date when I got it, no fw800, gig-E, or 802.11n, I cannot wait to ditch my G5 imac for a mini with a decent display, so that I can just swap out the computer and keep the screen every time I need a new feature, without breaking the bank.

    There's no way I'll be making that mistake again, especially with Apple still languishing behind equivalent PCs on such important features as built-in Bluray.
     
  7. k2spitfire88 thread starter macrumors 6502

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    #7
    But, is that relevant to standard users, as in not your typical Macrumors member? My experience has been that most consumers buy a tower, screen, mouse, and keyboard all together. And many consumers don't know about expandability, and graphics cards, and the like. They just buy one, and when it doesn't work well enough anymore, they buy a new one. Planned obsolescence has worked fine for most users, from what I have seen. Many do not really care about upgrading.
     
  8. iMacmatician macrumors 601

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    #8
    Also, do you think these will replace standalone desktops for Standard Consumers (not Macrumors members)?[/quote]Probably, at least things are moving in that direction. Pretty much makes sense to me too.

    The first thing I thought when reading that was "iPhone OS 3.0 on rumored Apple mini-tablet."
     
  9. uhohzitzcooky macrumors newbie

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    #9
    Average consumers LOVE the idea of an AIO. They're just not thrilled about the maintenance of one. Webcam goes out? CD/DVD Burner? PSU? All of these come to mind. As long as they start falling in price (the Dell Studio One is a good one to start at), they'll be considered more often.

    People like the idea of expandability, even if they never actually do it.
     
  10. Brien macrumors 68020

    Brien

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    #10
    I'm not surprised. The general user probably doesn't even know they can upgrade towers anyway.
     
  11. k2spitfire88 thread starter macrumors 6502

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    #11
    Wow, didn't even think of that.
     
  12. Consultant macrumors G5

    Consultant

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    #12
    Someone told me in the old days he used to carry Mac Classic (or equivalent) to different places using the built in carrying handle.
     
  13. Demosthenes X macrumors 68000

    Demosthenes X

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    #13
    The average consumer doesn't know or care what an expansion slot it. They don't know or care what a graphics card does. For the majority of home users, a computer is used for email, the web, maybe some Office and YouTube... none of these things require expansion slots. And by the time YouTube is showing super-high-Def, those consumers will just buy a new system.

    You are not a typical consumer.
     
  14. barkmonster macrumors 68020

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    #14
    1) Buying a new computer with everything built-in to gain up to date features the old model didn't have?

    2) Wanting to keep using a perfectly good display to save on cost?

    That sounds like the EXACT needs of a typical consumer who just wants an integrated system out of the box but doesn't want to have to pay for an integrated display too when they can keep they're existing one!
     
  15. ravenvii macrumors 604

    ravenvii

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    #15
    For me at least, it has. I'm loving my iMac, and am glad I don't have a tower taking space on or under the desk and adding to the cable clutter.

    I, of course, see the pros for having a tower, such as expandability and a separate display, but I don't need expandability (as another poster above said, computer power has long surpassed what I need or want, other than RAM and hard drive space, which, incidentally, IS upgradable on the iMac :)) For the display, it didn't bother me, since the cost of the iMac is low enough that I wouldn't mind replacing the display each time I replace the computer - I always take good care of my computers, so that it keeps as much of it's value as possible at the time I sell it and upgrade.

    If it dies before my computer does? That's what AppleCare is for.
     
  16. Dmac77 macrumors 68020

    Dmac77

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    #16
    I personally hope that AIOs don't replace standard desktops. I regret my decision to get an iMac, I hate the fact that I can't upgrade anything besides the RAM without violating its warranty. My next Mac will be a MBP which will allow me to upgrade the HDD at least. I would buy a MP if they weren't so expensive and they are way to much for my needs. IMO it would be a bad thing if AIOs replaced the normal desktop.

    Don
     
  17. ravenvii macrumors 604

    ravenvii

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    #17
    You can upgrade the HDD in an iMac without voiding the warranty. So what's the difference? You obviously don't absolutely need the portability of the MacBook, so you're sacrificing the screen size and comfort of use that's inherent with a desktop computer.
     
  18. Melrose macrumors 604

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    #18
    I think so too. I opened my Sony and Dell desktops, and after seeing the Chinese puzzle box in the Sony (well, Japanese puzzle box) and the innards of the Dell, I just closed them back up. Later I replaced RAM and a drive, but mostly doing stuff like this is pretty foreign to folks.

    And expansion slots being the harbinger of doom for All In Ones not being popular? Sorry, but I've never - not once in all my time with a computer - ever used an expansion slot. I know what they are but never had the need.

    All In Ones: Apple has been pushing that for ages, and only with the success of the iMac and the not-scathing reviews of that Dell One (or whatever it was) did they really get into mainstream. I really think that's the way it's moving for most computer users (the charge being led by Apple would not have been a factor) - technology is getting smaller (look at what they're putting laptops now). Granted for big honkin' users and video creatives you'll need tower power, but for the bulk of users you get an AIO and beef the RAM and you're good to go.
     
  19. trip1ex macrumors 68000

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    #19
    You upgrade your iMac by selling it and buying a new one.

    Pretty much a no-brainer that AIOs will dominate. That's what laptops are and the industry now sells more laptops than desktops.
     
  20. equalsabracket macrumors regular

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    Maybe they will, but i don't think it's solely or mainly encouraged by the imac. Apple have been selling computers like this for years and years and it hasn't caught on through those, so when it does catch on it can't suddenly be claimed that the imac inspired it.
     
  21. Melrose macrumors 604

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    #21
    It could be argued, however, that Apple was ahead of the curve and jump started the trend.
     
  22. jaw04005 macrumors 601

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    #22
    They've been saying this for years.

    What CNET is saying is nothing new, and it never materializes. Probably because the average cost of an all-in-one is higher than a complete desktop even with a monitor.

    Personally, I think the idea of the home desktop computer is on its away out. Everyone wants a notebook, and with 15" PC notebooks starting at $399 they're buying them despite the inferior hardware.

    Someone like my mother just wants to surf the Internet, type the occasionally Word document and look at (and maybe fix) her photos from her digital camera. That's it.
     
  23. dontwalkhand macrumors 601

    dontwalkhand

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    #23
    My iMac is great, and about the display problem that most people keep to seem spouting out.

    When you put the computer in another room, and you make room for your new one, at least that computer in your other room will already have a working display now., no need to buy another one, when, for example, giving your old computer to your kids, etc.
     
  24. djellison macrumors 68020

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    #24
    And wrong. The figures show quite clearly, that desktops are being replaced - by laptops.
     
  25. liptonlover macrumors 6502a

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    #25
    Apple definitely pushed the industry in that direction, by doing it first and doing it successfully.

    About upgrading you computer...
    I'm technical minded when it comes to computers, and I've always used desktop macs. Now I'm a decent gamer, which is the most common reason for requiring constantly up-to-date hardware, but even then I don't mind using macs that are older without upgrades. I've upgraded the RAM to 4gb and I plan on upgrading the hard drive, but neither were/are pressing problems. Most users don't mind using 10 year old machines. And the reason for that is that Apple has a very efficient OS that runs on older machines almost as well as current ones, and most users don't require a lot of power to get their jobs done.
     

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