Coding program similar to Notepad++

Discussion in 'Mac Programming' started by PeoTheOne1, Aug 13, 2015.

  1. PeoTheOne1 macrumors newbie

    Joined:
    Aug 5, 2015
    #1
    Hello MacRumors community,

    I've just bought myself a new Macbook Pro 15" and I'm looking for a coding app similar to that of Notepad++ on Windows. I really like the simplicity and the large number of languages included.
    The most important languages that should be included are:
    - C, C++, C#
    - Assembler
    - VHDL
    - HTML
    - XML
    - Python
    - ...
    I'm mainly into the embedded devices programming, and I know there are usually a lot of development suites available for each different language. however to quickly glance over a certain code with text markup without having to launch the entire dev suite would be great for me. Thanks!
     
  2. superscape macrumors 6502a

    superscape

    Joined:
    Feb 12, 2008
    Location:
    East Riding of Yorkshire, UK
    #2
    Have you taken a look at the free TextWrangler, or its non-free bigger brother BBEdit?
     
  3. iSee macrumors 68040

    iSee

    Joined:
    Oct 25, 2004
    #3
    I use TextMate like that. (For what it's worth, I too use Notepad++ as my go-to lightweight text-editor on Windows.)

    You'll want the 2.0 beta (which, despite being called a beta has been solid for years and gets updates). It seems like it's free these days. (Unless my old 1.x license is somehow working with me realizing it.)
     
  4. jerwin macrumors 65816

    Joined:
    Jun 13, 2015
    #4
    My workflow of late involves using xcode to edit python, using the terminal.

    To make a file..

    "touch test.py"

    to edit it

    "open test.py"

    to execute it

    "python test.py"

    but there are probably easier ways.
     
  5. theluggage macrumors 68030

    Joined:
    Jul 29, 2011
    #5
    'Standalone' editors:

    TextWrangler (http://www.barebones.com/products/textwrangler/) - free
    Atom (https://atom.io) - free
    Sublime Text (http://www.sublimetext.com) - paid

    I'd say TextWrangler is good if you want something with a shallow learning curve that you can use in between 'suites'. For "power users", SublimeText seems to be the choice for 'serious' editor users who have torn themselves away from vi or emacs, Atom is the new shiny for the github generation.
     
  6. 960design macrumors 68000

    Joined:
    Apr 17, 2012
    Location:
    Destin, FL
    #6
    I use Coda for web projects and Atom for everything else.
     
  7. throAU macrumors 601

    throAU

    Joined:
    Feb 13, 2012
    Location:
    Perth, Western Australia
    #7
    textwrangler is somewhat similar to notepad++

    or learn vim
     
  8. robvas macrumors 68020

    Joined:
    Mar 29, 2009
    Location:
    USA
    #8
    KomodoEdit

    vim

    emacs

    :D

    textmate 2

    adobe brackets

    aquamacs espresso
     
  9. ArtOfWarfare macrumors 604

    ArtOfWarfare

    Joined:
    Nov 26, 2007
    #10
    What is all this crap you guys are suggesting?

    Was it the fact that he named a crappy text editor that made you think he really wanted a crappy text editor?

    Sublime Text. It has a $70 price tag but an unlimited demo, no strings attached. I've been using the demo on ~5 different machines over the past several years. I'll pay the $70 someday when I actually have that much money to my name that doesn't immediately need to pay a different bill.
     
  10. superscape macrumors 6502a

    superscape

    Joined:
    Feb 12, 2008
    Location:
    East Riding of Yorkshire, UK
    #11
    Purely because I've never heard anyone have such a strong opinion about a text editor, I'm going to give your recommendation of Sublime Text a try. ;) I still say that TextWrangler is a respectable text editor though.
     
  11. Dranix macrumors 6502a

    Dranix

    Joined:
    Feb 26, 2011
    Location:
    Gelnhausen, Germany
    #12
    Why call coderunner crap? It is a very nice environment for IDE free coding.

    But I shouldn't wonder after reading of your opinion of one of the most annoyong editors I rver met: Sublime...
     
  12. 556fmjoe macrumors 65816

    Joined:
    Apr 19, 2014
    #13
    Heh. You must be one of the lucky ones spared the great editor war.

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Editor_war

    (I use vi)
     
  13. ArtOfWarfare macrumors 604

    ArtOfWarfare

    Joined:
    Nov 26, 2007
    #14
    I also use vi, when I'm stuck in a text only environment. The main reason is just because it's part of the POSIX standard, so I know it's going to be there for me, whereas emacs isn't standard (and so I've never taken the time to learn how to use it.)
     
  14. iSee macrumors 68040

    iSee

    Joined:
    Oct 25, 2004
    #15
    Heh, one thing I've learned in all my years on this earth: The more trivial the differences between the options, the more vociferous the debate. In the end you'll probably find one that suits you without too much trouble. And after a while you'll have a hard time imagining going with anything else. Text editors, religion, it goes the same.
     
  15. ahall52 macrumors newbie

    Joined:
    Feb 3, 2013
    #16
    Am I the only guy that uses Komodo Edit as my primary editor? I never see it come up in threads like these... I wonder if I'm doing everything wrong in my life.
     
  16. Dranix macrumors 6502a

    Dranix

    Joined:
    Feb 26, 2011
    Location:
    Gelnhausen, Germany
  17. throAU macrumors 601

    throAU

    Joined:
    Feb 13, 2012
    Location:
    Perth, Western Australia
    #18
    And why is this better than any of the options above, some of which, including VIM come pre-installed?

    Sure, VIM isn't for everyone, but it will run over SSH and give you skills which will translate to any unix machine, which plenty of the other options will not.
     
  18. ArtOfWarfare macrumors 604

    ArtOfWarfare

    Joined:
    Nov 26, 2007
    #19
    VIM doesn't do anything automatically. No automatic indenting, no ability to recognize blocks of code, no code highlighting. The only appealing part of VIM is that it runs over SSH and, like you said, is pre-installed. So if you need to quickly change a file on a server that has no desktop manager and it'll be quicker than transferring the file to your local machine and back, then use VIM. Otherwise, it's about par with TextEdit for how useful it is.
     
  19. theluggage macrumors 68030

    Joined:
    Jul 29, 2011
    #20
    VIM is for softies - you really must learn a line editor like 'ed' in case you fall through a time warp to the 1980s and have to fix a system from the teletype console because all the VT100s are down...

    Meanwhile, in the 21st Century, here's all you need to know about VIM:

    Code:
    vipw
    (curse loudly)
    :q!
    export EDITOR=/usr/bin/nano (or one of the other fine text editors available)
    vipw
    
    ...and remember to avoid DeLoreans, police telephone boxes and swirly purple vortex thingies.

    Of course, you may actually like VIM which is perfectly permissible, but probably means you've been using it daily for years... like many applications with a steep learning curve, you can get very efficient with it over time.

    Meanwhile, TextWrangler has a built-in SFTP client (as, I assume, do most of the other contenders here) or you could use something like Transmit to browse files over SSH, so you can edit files in your lovely Mac GUI without having to copy them back and forth.

    No, but the comment "however to quickly glance... without having to launch the entire dev suite" kinda suggests that the OP was going to be bouncing around between the editors in various IDEs and needed something that was quick and easy to use 'between' IDEs.

    TextWrangler is fairly straightforward and everything it can do is right there in the menu.

    Sublime Text may be great but getting your $70 worth out of it includes some considerable investment of time in learning the commands and selecting plug-ins. Not saying its got the same sort of learning curve as VIM - but my definite impression of it was that it took a while to exploit fully.
     
  20. robvas macrumors 68020

    Joined:
    Mar 29, 2009
    Location:
    USA
    #21
    A guy at work uses it (well, he used to but now he uses Coda) so gave it a shot.

    Good things: It's Java based so it runs on Windows, Linux, and Mac
    Bad thing: It's Java based so it's not as fast or as nice as a Mac native editor. It also is a little CPU (and therefore battery) heavy
     
  21. SDDave2007 macrumors regular

    Joined:
    Apr 12, 2007
    #22
    Ok... my 2cents since I'm amazed nobody mentioned it...

    ULTRAEDIT for OSX by IDM
     
  22. Dranix macrumors 6502a

    Dranix

    Joined:
    Feb 26, 2011
    Location:
    Gelnhausen, Germany
    #23
    Is it any better then the really bad Windows version?
     
  23. 556fmjoe macrumors 65816

    Joined:
    Apr 19, 2014
    #24
    Am I the only one who prefers vi to vim?

    (Technically I use nvi, but whatever...)
     
  24. NutsNGum macrumors 68030

    NutsNGum

    Joined:
    Jul 30, 2010
    Location:
    Glasgow, Scotland
    #25
    What's the difference? I thought VI was how lazy people said Vim.

    I use nano (over SSH), because I like to take 30 minutes to do a job I could do in Vim in 30 seconds.

    Generally use Sublime for local development though, as it's the best thing since sliced bread.

    Tried Atom, but found that it lacked a couple of nice keyboard shortcuts that exist in Sublime, plus it feels slower.
     

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