Colleges for Technology

Discussion in 'Community Discussion' started by Grant1210, Apr 9, 2012.

  1. Grant1210 macrumors member

    Joined:
    Jul 7, 2011
    #1
    Hello my name is Grant, and I am looking for a good college that will provide me a good education on video game design, 3d animation, or even video editing... I live in Indiana.. so anywhere that is close to that will help.. and if you know about any scholarships that I could be able to get as well please let me know thanks.. :)

    :apple::apple:
     
  2. eric/ Guest

    eric/

    Joined:
    Sep 19, 2011
    Location:
    Ohio, United States
    #2
    I heard the Massachusetts institute of technology was a good one. Oh and then there is that one in California.
     
  3. soloer macrumors 6502a

    soloer

    Joined:
    Sep 27, 2004
    Location:
    Omaha
    #3
    Caltech! I worked there for 7 years though and don't remember hearing anything related to video game design being offered.
     
  4. ravenvii macrumors 604

    ravenvii

    Joined:
    Mar 17, 2004
    Location:
    Melenkurion Skyweir
    #4
    DigiPen is one I hear about from time to time concerning video game design.
     
  5. xboxer75010 macrumors 6502

    xboxer75010

    Joined:
    Oct 6, 2006
    Location:
    Carrollton, TX
  6. blevins321 macrumors 68030

    Joined:
    Dec 24, 2010
    Location:
    Winnipeg, MB
    #6
    Full Sail in Orlando, FL is one that is known for video game design. I have a friend going there.
     
  7. Grant1210 thread starter macrumors member

    Joined:
    Jul 7, 2011
    #7
    Thanks for all of your comments but I was looking for schools in Chicago area or in Indiana.. and i was wondering to if you need to take the act to go to a technology school?.. can someone please help me?
     
  8. chrono1081 macrumors 604

    chrono1081

    Joined:
    Jan 26, 2008
    Location:
    Isla Nublar
    #8
    If you want to do video games DigiPen is the place to go. The school is owned my Nintendo and their student projects and their grad stories are amazing.

    That being said most people will recommend going for a traditional 4 year computer science degree, and making games on the side. Lots of times your interests will change in college and you may find you like doing something other than game development.

    Games are a TON of work (trust me, I know from experience as I make them on the side as a hobby) and require expertise in many disciplines including programming, math, 3D graphics technologies, etc.

    In the real world, you'll be specializing in one of these areas but if you work for a small studio or by yourself you'll need to learn it all.

    Also, since you added things like animation and video editing I'd really suggest going to a 4 year college where you can try all of these things.

    As for what test to take I have no clue what ACT even is, we had SAT scores and that was it.

    Don't worry about the prerequisites when applying to colleges, I was well below the average and I still got in. I also had no computer science classes which was a requirement for the computer science program but still got accepted. (My crap high school literally took money they had and instead of building a computer lab and offering computer classes dumped it all into useless sports.)
     
  9. Grant1210 thread starter macrumors member

    Joined:
    Jul 7, 2011
    #9
    hey thanks for all of that advice.. im still looking for certain colleges right now... but i always wanted to work for apple or IBM(lenovo) or any computer company but I don't know what to pick for my major then??
     
  10. chrono1081 macrumors 604

    chrono1081

    Joined:
    Jan 26, 2008
    Location:
    Isla Nublar
    #10
    You're welcome. For those places, computer science with either a focus in software engineering or computer engineering.
     
  11. Grant1210 thread starter macrumors member

    Joined:
    Jul 7, 2011
    #11
    Hey sounds good... I like to get advice from those who are wiser than me !! Thank you soo much!!
     
  12. KylePowers macrumors 68000

    KylePowers

    Joined:
    Mar 5, 2011
    #12
    I'd say pick a major you're interested in, not one that'd be advantageous for a certain company. You have no idea what working for their company could be like, but you'll always know whether you like what you're learning.

    If you like game design, 3D animation, or video editing... I doubt you'll be working for any sort of company like Apple or Lenovo, as they don't do any of those things. If you like the products they put out and want to help make them, then you could almost pick any other major- computer science for software, computer or electrical engineering for hardware, mechanical engineering or industrial design for design, economics/business for sales/marketing.

    It just depends on what you're actually interested in and willing to work for.

    I'm an electrical engineering major myself, focusing in microprocessor design (VLSI specifically). But I've taken all sorts of computer engineering and computer science courses as well.
     
  13. VPrime macrumors 68000

    VPrime

    Joined:
    Dec 19, 2008
    Location:
    London Ontario
    #13
    Most often video game design schools are a waste of time and don't actually teach you anything that the industry is really looking for.
     
  14. Grant1210 thread starter macrumors member

    Joined:
    Jul 7, 2011
    #14
    Well thanks guys for pointing out all of these attributes that I will put into play... I thought you simply go to a college for animation design and then you would simply get a job? but computer science i will look into it.. Its just that im not the best at math so would that be a disadvantage?
     
  15. MorphingDragon, Apr 21, 2012
    Last edited: Apr 21, 2012

    MorphingDragon macrumors 603

    MorphingDragon

    Joined:
    Mar 27, 2009
    Location:
    The World Inbetween
    #15
    DigiPen!

    James Portnow is an amazing person if you take his Masters course at the US campus.

    But, the great thing about VGames is that they are an art form. Everything you learn at a course is just a guideline, its perfectly valid to start exploring your own ways to implement and design games.
     

Share This Page