Complete IT solution help

Discussion in 'Community Discussion' started by paddy, Feb 18, 2009.

  1. paddy macrumors 6502a

    paddy

    Joined:
    Jun 25, 2005
    Location:
    TN
    #1
    Hi,

    I've been given a group project for college where we have to design a complete IT solution based around "the 5 basic elements of IT infrastructure", for a company with 8 employees atm, expanding to 15 in the next 24 months.

    Could you guys help me build a complete IT solution for under 15k? The group has picked out some cheap laptops, pc's, servers, printers and software. What else would we need?

    Any help would be greaty appreciated!

    Thanks,
    Paddy
     
  2. robbieduncan Moderator emeritus

    robbieduncan

    Joined:
    Jul 24, 2002
    Location:
    London
    #2
    You want us to do your college assignment? Get real.
     
  3. drlunanerd macrumors 65816

    drlunanerd

    Joined:
    Feb 14, 2004
    Location:
    UK
    #3
    Earth, Wind, Fire, Water, Wood :D

    No Apple hardware = no help.
    Try DellRumors.com ;)
     
  4. Sesshi macrumors G3

    Sesshi

    Joined:
    Jun 3, 2006
    Location:
    One Nation Under Gordon
    #4

    Oh come on - as a Mac user he obviously doesn't know where to start, away from the world of people who primarily draw pictures for a living. We could lend a hand. I'm going to have a quick think about this and get back.

    To the OP, you'll have to be more specific about the software.
     
  5. drlunanerd macrumors 65816

    drlunanerd

    Joined:
    Feb 14, 2004
    Location:
    UK
    #5
    Got my Crayolas and Rotrings ready... ;)
     
  6. r1ch4rd macrumors 6502a

    r1ch4rd

    Joined:
    Aug 5, 2005
    Location:
    Manchester UK
    #6
    I do this stuff for a living and I don't know what the "the 5 basic elements of IT infrastructure" are. For a company with only 8 employees you could probably get away with a badass spreadsheet.
     
  7. paddy thread starter macrumors 6502a

    paddy

    Joined:
    Jun 25, 2005
    Location:
    TN
    #7
    Sorry if I came across as a lazy moocher, I should have been more specific.

    By the 5 elements of IT infrastructure she means hardware, software, networking, database and database management.

    We've picked out our 5 workstations and 3 laptops, printers and most of our software. We've managed to price that at €4,335.39 What's confusing me is the server, database and database management part! (not great with comps!).

    Would this do for all our server/networking needs?

    EDIT: Unfortunately we're stuck in Windows land software wise. All the comps we've ordered come with Vista (yuck), we're getting AVG for Business and OpenOffice. I think that would suffice (except maybe some software for the server).

    All I want really is a basic idea of what I need, more to make sure I'm not missing out on any vital component which would cost me a huge load of marks! Once I have that I can go away and do the pricings of a load of different brands and then do my spreadsheet and powerpoint.
     
  8. Sesshi macrumors G3

    Sesshi

    Joined:
    Jun 3, 2006
    Location:
    One Nation Under Gordon
    #8
    Vista was only 'yuck' for the first six months. Now it's as good as Leopard in most of the key ways, if not better. It's however not as self-absorbed-entitlist friendly perhaps.

    As far as the server software is concerned, you can go with MS Small Business Server Standard, which gets you Server 2008 and Exchange 2007 - and is an affordable addition, especially when preloaded into a Dell server. If you want to stick with Microsoft for database, then there's the Small Business Server Premium edition, which ships with an additional copy of Server 2008 and SQL Server. You'll also need an addition 5-user CAL for either (10 users total), and an additional 5 when you expand.

    These are powerful suites. Provided you know what's under the hood, what you get is essentially the same tools as large corporates are using at their core. But it requires appropriate knowledge to get the most out of it. As much as I like the idea of MS SBS, I don't think it actually works all that well in companies where you don't have someone who is able to configure / manage it properly. And I think that's the majority of very small businesses with no need for their server to talk to the outside world in any other way than mail.

    If you also want to maintain your PC's, you'll also need systems management. There's many ways to go about this - but really, if you are a Mac user or even someone who would Switch given the chance, and therefore use/prefer a computer for the level of technological ignorance it panders to, it's better to get others to do it for you.

    And there is a way of doing that, and also kicking Microsoft completely out of the equation as far as the server is concerned. If you're a basic outfit, as I said above this will not be an issue and you can retain Windows PC's for users. Take a look at the Zybert Z1. It's an outfit run from academia, so they might also be able to help you out in more ways than a company like Dell. The server is based around common Linux technologies, tied in with a user-friendly shell. The rest is handled remotely via a low-cost support contract with Zybert. It's capabilities are low compared to SBS, but then it probably does all of what the typical office user* would think of doing.

    *The sort of people who say to you "I'm not very good with computers" while having been sat in front of one for 8 hours a day for several years
     

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