Composite Acrylic Sink vs Vitreous China

Discussion in 'Community Discussion' started by samcraig, Jan 5, 2019.

  1. samcraig macrumors P6

    Joined:
    Jun 22, 2009
    Location:
    USA
    #1
    We're doing some renovations. Anyone have a composite acrylic sink in their bathroom? We're deciding between two sinks. Previously we had a vitreous china and had no issues with it. But one of the vanities we're looking at comes with a composite acrylic. I've read pros and cons online about acrylic. Just wanted some real world feedback...

    Thanks!
     
  2. Zenithal, Jan 5, 2019
    Last edited: Jan 5, 2019

    Zenithal macrumors 603

    Joined:
    Sep 10, 2009
    #2
    My vote would go towards the china. It's easier to maintain in the long run, but comes with heft (duh). Other material choices are granite and quartz, though these are usually compounded and dyed for a sleek modern aesthetic. Both are durable, but as pointed out, are heftier than even the ceramic. Also depends on whether you're looking at a mounted sink on granite or other material or a once piece top. I mean, chances of breaking a sink are slim, but there's a cost benefit to either choice and of course it depends on the bathroom's aesthetic.

    Composite acrylics are strong, but overtime their surface breaks down due to the composition of soaps and or other cleaning solutions, scratches and whatnot. I would be open to using a composite sink in say a laundry room, where I didn't care too much about keeping it sparkling. Clean, but not sparkling. The china coated ceramic should last almost indefinitely with good, basic care. Though it can crack if you throw something heavy into it or do multiple hot/cold cycles, at which point I'd question why you'd be doing that in the first place.

    Stainless steel is also another sink variety that doesn't get as much love. You'll want to opt for a brushed variety instead of a polished type. I think it can look rather good in a traditional setting for a slightly modern look without being too modern. Arguably, it's also easier to maintain because you have a wider breadth of cleaners to pick from over the ceramic china. It won't chip if something heavy is thrown in, but it may dent. They're easier to sanitize, too.


    Honestly, in this day and age consumers have a lot of choice in what they use. I would, however, never use glass. Glass is fine, but small defects in the glass can cause it to surprise shatter one day down the line.



    Edit: And a tip for you. Sinks are designed with a small catch near the drain's end which you can't see. Sometimes water, soap, hair and dead skin cells can accumulate there and cause it to emit a foul smell. You can avoid this or fix the problem by buying a large gallon container of hydrogen peroxide (2-3%) and pouring about a cup in slowly. Leave it for half an hour and when you come back it should have foamed up and dislodged a lot of gunk which you can wash away. This will also work for the overflow hole that leads directly to that catch. So if you want you can use a small funnel to direct that fluid to the catch. If the sink doesn't have one, refer back to the initial advice.
     
  3. samcraig thread starter macrumors P6

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    Jun 22, 2009
    Location:
    USA
    #3
    Helpful... Thanks!
     
  4. Scepticalscribe Contributor

    Scepticalscribe

    Joined:
    Jul 29, 2008
    Location:
    The Far Horizon
    #4
    Excellent, interesting, very informative and thoughtful post.

    I enjoyed reading it, and even learned a few things from it.

    Personally, I don't have any experience with composite acrylic sinks, but my aesthetic (and practical) preference would always be for china, or granite, or quartz. That is because I love the appearance and feel of equipment manufactured from natural products.
     
  5. Zenithal macrumors 603

    Joined:
    Sep 10, 2009
    #5
    Usually in those use cases they're crushed and formed in a very strong composite. It still retains considerable weight but is much stronger than a flat cut of the rock. Quartz is a bit easier since it's a composite already. Even with the polymers they use in it, it's almost impervious to ruining itself.

    Provided one can shell out the money required, you can find both granite and quartz (made to look) like something like marble. It'll cost almost the same, but without the headache marble can bring because of its high upkeep requirements, and how prone it is to being easily damaged.


    Bathroom use outside of a countertop is relatively new in the North American market giving changes in tastes across a wide demographic. I think I saw carved granite or molded quartz in very modern styles back in the mid 90s in western Europe, similar to today's modern shapes, slants and other intricacies.

    If I were going for an absolutely modern but conservative look for a kitchen or bathroom, I'd pick out a thick slab of quartz dyed in a nice dark color that provides an almost uniform look. There is an Israeli company that operates globally called CaesarStone which makes incredible varieties of quarts countertops and other goods pertaining to living spaces. So if you wanted British Racing Green quarts countertops, you could have that. If you wanted, you could get a close approximation to Rosso Red by Ferrari in your bathroom countertop or the sink itself with the countertop in white quartz.

    Though if you wanted to replicate marble, you can or go with granite and find varieties or slabs of certain varieties that resemble marble. But, as I said, in either case expect to pay as much as a slab of marble will cost.


    For kitchen use, I like either granite or high end quartz. I don't like wood countertops, though these are mainly on kitchen islands in some new constructions or remodeled older homes/flats. I also dislike stainless steel countertops. They look fine when new, but they don't age well, may tarnish, scratched up, develop a cloudy film, etc. They're generally easier to damage over time.
     
  6. A.Goldberg macrumors 68020

    A.Goldberg

    Joined:
    Jan 31, 2015
    Location:
    Boston
    #6
    I’m not sure about the acrylic but from a practical staindpoint my concern with the ceramic is if you drop a plate or glass in the sink it’s hardness is more likely to crack the plate or glass. That’s what i like about stainless- it’s a little more forgiving.
     
  7. willmtaylor macrumors G3

    willmtaylor

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    Oct 31, 2009
    Location:
    A Natural State
    #7
    In the bathroom? :confused:
     
  8. A.Goldberg macrumors 68020

    A.Goldberg

    Joined:
    Jan 31, 2015
    Location:
    Boston
    #8
    Oh my bad. Yeah forget what I said.
     
  9. willmtaylor macrumors G3

    willmtaylor

    Joined:
    Oct 31, 2009
    Location:
    A Natural State
    #9
    Hahaha. I figured but couldn’t resist. :D

    Though, you actually made me ponder what stainless sinks in the bathroom would look like. :)
     
  10. LizKat macrumors 601

    LizKat

    Joined:
    Aug 5, 2004
    Location:
    Catskill Mountains
    #10
    Oval mixing bowls? :rolleyes: Too clinical. I'd probably stick with china.
     
  11. Zenithal macrumors 603

    Joined:
    Sep 10, 2009
    #11
    Yes, the stainless has a little more give in a kitchen sink, which is nice. However, something heavy enough can dent or gouge the stainless. It's a trade off however you look at it.
     

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