iPad Pro Confirmed: 1Gbps via Ethernet USB-C, no power connection required

Discussion in 'iPad' started by BeatCrazy, Nov 7, 2018.

  1. BeatCrazy macrumors 68000

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    Jul 20, 2011
    #1
    Using the 11” Pro, I can confirm it has capability for 1Gbps via USB-C Ethernet adapter. I tested this today with a Startech US1GC30B USB-C to Ethernet adapter. No additional power needed for this 10/100/1000 adapter, unlike previous iPads. I also have the Belkin USB-C to Ethernet adapter (the one Apple sells on their website) en route, I will test as well.

    I have 1Gbps service via AT&T Fiber 1000, and my Speedtest app results hover around 750-850Mbps up/down.
     
  2. cibonak macrumors 6502

    cibonak

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  3. BeatCrazy thread starter macrumors 68000

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    Jul 20, 2011
    #3
    If you have poor Wi-Fi, or just want to take advantage of the fastest internet speeds possible, you can do so with a USB-C to Ethernet adapter. Very handy for big iOS updates, can save substantial time downloading.
     
  4. cibonak macrumors 6502

    cibonak

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  5. Perene, Nov 7, 2018
    Last edited: Nov 7, 2018

    Perene macrumors 6502a

    Perene

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    #5
    What I am more interested to know is if the INTERNAL UL/DL speeds can be as close as these, a result I achieved with another gigabit ethernet adapter, for the now old IPP 10.5:

    [​IMG]

    For that you'll also need:

    a) A Gigabit router (I have two: Archer C8 and VR900)
    b) At least CAT 5-E ethernet cable (I use CAT-6).

    I measured in my PC, using this software: https://codebox.net/pages/bitmeteros

    While transfering files to my IPP 10.5, using this other app: https://itunes.apple.com/us/app/nplayer-plus/id539397400?mt=8

    Or the free version: https://itunes.apple.com/us/app/nplayer-lite/id1078835991

    If something is not gigabit then the max speed will be 12 MB/s, which is very slow and insufficient.

    While I used wi-fi I got no more than 60 MB/s in the past.

    ******
    P.S. I also noticed this (my internet is 120/10 Mbps):

    - With a non-gigabit adapter: Speedtest result = 90/10 Mbps
    - If it's gigabit = close to 120/10 Mbps.

    ******
    Again: without a gigabit router + at least CAT 5-E ethernet cable this test can't be done.

    Sometimes I want to transfer big files from my PC to the iPAD. I may send a Blu-ray (1080p) lossless direct rip file with over 30 GB this way, easily, or even a UHD-BD file with almost double that size (4K = 2160p).

    This also helps a lot with small files that have 1, 2 GB. I can't stress enough how painfully slow it is to send (or receive) files from my PC to the iPAD at 12 MB/s.
     
  6. BeatCrazy thread starter macrumors 68000

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    Jul 20, 2011
    #6
    Shouldn’t we assume the new iPad Pros have internal transfer speeds to at least match the 10.5?
     
  7. Perene, Nov 7, 2018
    Last edited: Nov 7, 2018

    Perene macrumors 6502a

    Perene

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    #7
    When you do this sort of test you are trying to find out if all your equipment is OK, not just the iPAD. You are analysing the gigabit wi-fi router, the ethernet cables and the ethernet adapter. Perhaps how fast your computer is, too, since it will have to be enough (the hard drive?) to do this task.

    You can't tell without measuring if the UL/DL speeds (while sending files from a PC to the IPAD) are good.

    12 MB/s is so slow that you might have problems even if only one person was streaming a Blu-ray direct rip (lossless), from a PC to your iPAD.

    If you can get 100 MB/s or close to it then you may even handle 4K and probably better resolution (5K? 8K?) versions in the future.

    Unfortunately very few people care about what I just explained and even less actually do this kind of test.

    I have a 120/10 Mbps broadband internet... sometimes I download videos (not necessarily big - they may have a few Gigabytes). With 4K contents, files with 3, 4 or double that size, in GB - are now very common. It won't do you any good to have 1 Gbps if you are limited to 12 MB/s in your internal network.

    You may also use nPlayer or a similar app to transfer from the camera roll (in nPlayer go to camera roll - select the desired file, and copy to a random folder from the app - then enable "wi-fi transfer", to generate a random IP for your PC browser to visit).

    Imagine you have recorded a 5, 10 GB video in 4K (using this iPAD), how are you going to transfer this to a PC (for further edits, or uploading elsewhere, not just Youtube) - with an adapter or setup that only limits you to 12 MB/s? What would take 2 minutes will likely be extended to 20 or 25.

    About wi-fi, I think only using 5 GHz and at a closer distance from the router you can get the max gigabit speeds. Still I don't believe there isn't going to be any loss and I predict it would be impossible to match the speeds I showed you about (over 100 MB/s).
     
  8. Tinototem macrumors regular

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    Sep 28, 2010
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    Sweden
    #8
    i bought a USB-C to Ethernet adapter too, yesterday i synced 30 GB of movies and tv-show to the iPad at a peak rate of ~110 MB/s. Its really awesome but i will only use it when i transfer lots of data else WiFi is good enough.
     
  9. ChristianVirtual macrumors 601

    ChristianVirtual

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    May 10, 2010
    Location:
    日本
    #9
    I used a port replicator from HP, works like a charm. Can also charge at the same time ...
    HDMI, Ethernet ...
    181A46FE-EB72-4D43-8DC8-EBED435AF038.jpeg
     

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8 November 7, 2018