Resolved Connect 2 HP L1950 monitors to 2018 Mini ?

Dezlboy

macrumors regular
Original poster
Sep 10, 2008
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Current 'early 2009 Mini' supports two HP L1950 monitors at 1280 - 1024 resolution. Each monitor is connected via a DVI-D cable; and two adaptors to connect to the 2009 Mini ports (a mini-DVI adaptor and Mini DisplayPort adaptor).

Would like to use same monitors for my (just ordered) 2018 i5 Mac Mini.

FYI: HP L1950 specs -- https://www.cnet.com/products/hp-l1950-series/specs/

Questions:

1. Using the existing DVI-D to DVI-D cables, will these adaptors allow connection to the Mini's Thunderbolt 3 (USB-C) ports?

https://www.amazon.com/USB-C-to-DVI-Adapter/dp/B01FM52F00/ref=pd_lpo_vtph_147_lp_t_2?_encoding=UTF8&psc=1&refRID=X6TYGDGWF92F6MRVFAA6

2. If so, is it preferable to buy two new cables instead as:

https://www.amazon.com/Smolink-Thunderbolt-Adapter-2017iMac-ChromeBook/dp/B076367RYZ/ref=sr_1_3?ie=UTF8&qid=1542427040&sr=8-3&keywords=dvi-d+to+thunderbolt+3


3. Will connecting these old monitors be "plug and play" and run at 1280 - 1024 resolution? In other words, will the monitors work as they work now, without me tearing my hair out having to change all sorts of settings and asking all of you for help? :)


Why use these monitors? They serve my uses (web, email, even Netflix sometimes, word, excel). And unsure of what I may upgrade to in future.

Thanks for reading these questions. You all were a great aid in helping me pick the i5 mini.
 

Stephen.R

macrumors 65816
Nov 2, 2018
1,363
903
Thailand
If you have to buy new adapters or cables of some sort, I'd aim for the setup with least 'connections' - it'll be easier for cable management, less issues with loose connections or damage etc.

So, (I wont link stuff, because I doubt a retailer in Thailand is where you'll be buying stuff) with that in mind, to make best use of your ports, you could get one HDMI to DVI-D cable, and one USB-C to DVI-D cable. This would leave three USB-C/TB3 ports free on the Mini.

They should "just work(tm)", but you may find that the text isn't as crisp as you see now, under Mojave, due to changes in how it handles anti-aliasing for non-retina displays. There are numerous guides/articles/threads about how to adjust it to restore some of the smoothness (I don't know that it goes back to exactly how it used to be, but it is apparently much better than the 'default' under Mojave). A quick DDG search for 'mojave display anti aliasing' gave me http://osxdaily.com/2018/09/26/fix-blurry-thin-fonts-text-macos-mojave/.
 
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Dezlboy

macrumors regular
Original poster
Sep 10, 2008
227
47
Stephen.R - Thank you very much for your detailed response. :) Although, the setting changes to correct the less than optimum text under non-retina monitors are straight forward, your explanations lead me to conclude that ditching the old monitors now and upgrading to a retina (4K?) is the way to go. Especially as I would have done so within 6 months or so.

Please don't think you wasted your time providing your response. It was very helpful.