Connect MacBook 12" to Thunderbolt Display

Discussion in 'MacBook' started by sakabaro, Aug 7, 2015.

  1. sakabaro macrumors regular

    Joined:
    Feb 24, 2015
    #1
    Hey,

    I am looking for way to connect my MacBook 12" to a Thunderbolt Display.

    I don't seem to find any adapters. I've been looking for USB-C to Mini Display (none on amazon or apple) and, as I've already USB-C to HDMI, a HDMI male to Mini Display female. (none on amazon or apple).

    Any ideas?

    Thanks!
     
  2. ssmed macrumors 6502

    ssmed

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    Sep 28, 2009
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    UK
    #2
    This is not possible – there have never been any USB to TB adaptors.
     
  3. Flunkyturtle macrumors 6502

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    Dec 20, 2011
    #3
    Not currently available, but i'd imagine they will release a way soon
     
  4. BlakeBrattina macrumors 6502a

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    Pittsburgh, PA
    #4
    It's a shame they haven't yet, as I'm likely to purchase a new MB soon. I'd love to see some sort of performance response on it though.
     
  5. Niarlatop, Aug 7, 2015
    Last edited: Aug 8, 2015

    Niarlatop macrumors member

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    May 13, 2015
    #5
    They will not, TB Display needs ThunderBolt, and the 2015 MacBook doesn't include it.
     
  6. Silverbird0000 macrumors 6502a

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    Sep 19, 2006
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    Fort Myers, FL
    #6
    When this releases, it will do exactly what you want. I want this too.

    http://www.nonda.co/products/usb-c-hub-for-apple-new-macbook-12-plus
     
  7. ssmed macrumors 6502

    ssmed

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    #7
    The TB display required TB not mini-display, this will not work. You could put an older Mac 24 or 27 inch display on this adaptor. The system requirements for the TB display are:
    Thunderbolt-enabled Mac computer, including MacBook Air, MacBook Pro, Mac mini and iMac - OS X v10.6.8 or later
     
  8. mkelly, Aug 8, 2015
    Last edited: Aug 10, 2015

    mkelly macrumors regular

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    Nov 29, 2007
    #8
    No, it will not actually do what you want.

    Thunderbolt is essentially a PCI-e bus, which carries a lot more information than just video/audio. The tricky part is that they used a Mini-Displayport form factor for the Thunderbolt plug, so it looks as though it would work.

    You *can* plug a regular Mini-DisplayPort *display* into a Thunderbolt-equipped computer. The computer will recognize that the display is just mini-displayport and send only video/audio. But the reverse isn't true: you cannot plug a Thunderbolt monitor into a computer with a Mini Displayport. The video signal is sent via the PCIe bus, which doesn't exist on a plain old Mini Displayport connector.

    Older Mac Mini owners have been trying to do this for years - the 2010 Mac Minis have Mini Displayports, not Thunderbolt ports ... and people keep trying to plug them into Thunderbolt displays and end up being disappointed.

    You would have to create an adapter that *generates* a PCIe bus... and that wouldn't be cheap. There are a number of USB->Thunderbolt adapters out there but they work in the opposite direction - they allow you to add extra USB ports via the Thunderbolt port.
     
  9. windywalks macrumors 6502

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    Mar 12, 2004
    #9
    Once Macbooks have USB type-c connectors that support Thunderbolt 3 protocol, then yes, you'll be able to use an adapter. But that's not going to happen any time soon.
     
  10. danny_w macrumors 601

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    Mar 8, 2005
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    Austin, TX
    #10
    You are correct on everything except the 2012 Mac Mini - it *does* have a thunderbolt port. I use mine connected to daisy-chained thunderbolt RAID arrays for external storage.
     
  11. mkelly macrumors regular

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    Nov 29, 2007
    #11
    Absolutely correct. Slip of the fingers when typing. I meant to say my 2010 Mac Mini. The 2012 Mini does indeed have Thunderbolt. Edited my original post accordingly.

    (I have a 2012 rMBP too, which must be where my brain got the wrong year from ;-)
     
  12. zhenya macrumors 603

    zhenya

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    Jan 6, 2005
    #12
    This is *exactly* what I'm afraid is going to happen when Thunderbolt devices using the usb-c cable start to come out...
     
  13. sakabaro thread starter macrumors regular

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    Feb 24, 2015
    #13
    Why not any time soon? Is there a technical limitation impeaching Apple to do USB-C to Thunderbolt?
     
  14. windywalks macrumors 6502

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    Mar 12, 2004
    #14
    USB-C is going to be the new Display Port connector for future iterations of Thunderbolt.
    For now, until Intel's Skylake architecture finds it's way into Apple laptops, there's no USB-C fuelled Thunderbolt in sight.
    This might happen by the end of the year, but don't hold your breath yet, as the rMB probably won't see an update until early next year.
    Lenovo announced a Skylake and therefore TB 3 via USB-C capable laptop only today, but it's size is like a cruise ship to the rMB canoe ;)
     
  15. wmchenry macrumors newbie

    wmchenry

    Joined:
    Jul 28, 2015
    #15
    #
    Hi,

    Can anyone confirm whether a HDMI to VGA adapter works with the Apple USB-C Digital Multiport Adapter? The one I recently purchased from Amazon is not working with my works VGA monitor, and I am trying to troubleshoot the problem.

    Thanks in advance.
     
  16. sakabaro thread starter macrumors regular

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    Feb 24, 2015
    #16
    Does this mean that the current rMB won't be compatible with Thunderbolt, even if Apple release a USB-C -> Thunderbolt adapter? as rMB are not Skylake?
     
  17. sakabaro thread starter macrumors regular

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    Feb 24, 2015
    #17
    You have directly this: http://www.apple.com/shop/product/MJ1L2AM/A/usb-c-vga-multiport-adapter (USB-C -> VGA)
    Please don't hijack this thread.
     
  18. windywalks macrumors 6502

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    Mar 12, 2004
    #18
    No, the current rMB is only compatible with USB 3.1 Gen 1. specs, which do not include Thunderbolt functionality.
    The next generation might, but at that time we'll probably finally see an update to the Apple Thunderbolt Display too, with a USB-C connector to boot maybe.
     
  19. dyn macrumors 68030

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    .nl
    #19
    Just because Thunderbolt 3 now uses USB-C cabling and connectors does not make every machine that uses it suddenly Thunderbolt 3 capable. Thunderbolt is a separate chip. If the machine doesn't have that chip it won't do Thunderbolt at all. If you want to be able to use Thunderbolt devices then you need to have a computer that supports Thunderbolt. The current (and previous) MacBook does not have Thunderbolt and thus will never ever be able to support Thunderbolt devices. Period.

    What might happen is that a new MacBook version will come out that will have Thunderbolt 3 and thus support USB3.1 Gen 1 (aka USB3.0), Gen 2 and Thunderbolt 3. Apple may also decide that the MacBook stays the way it is now, thus without Thunderbolt. Considering that it uses a small circuitboard and Thunderbolt being another chip that needs to be fitted onto that board I doubt Apple will equip it with Thunderbolt 3. Maybe the use of 3D NAND for the memory might create enough space for it to happen. Wishful thinking :)
     
  20. sakabaro thread starter macrumors regular

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    Feb 24, 2015
    #20
    Ha, thanks dyn! That makes sense.

    From an PR point of view, that's a bit weird that's not already part of the MB. I mean you would expect the lastest Apple display to work with the latest MB. Specially, I feel they were selling the Thunderbolt as a kind of hub display that matches the MB use cases.
     
  21. dyn, Aug 15, 2015
    Last edited: Aug 15, 2015

    dyn macrumors 68030

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    #21
    Back in the day we had the iBook and the Powerbook. With the switch to Intel CPUs that became the MacBook and the MacBook Pro. The iBook/MacBook was the cheaper plastic version for the ordinary consumer while the Powerbook/MacBook Pro was the version for professionals and anybody requiring computing power and such.

    Could be that they are returning to that difference and if they do it won't make sense putting Thunderbolt in such a machine. Thunderbolt is for high end use and thus for the MacBook Pro line. I'm hoping that Apple will replace the MacBook Air line with the MacBook and put Thunderbolt in the MacBook. That would make a really cool little and portable device. Especially since Thunderbolt 3 also gives us official support for external GPUs.

    Btw, the Thunderbolt Display is meant to be a dockingstation for all their notebooks and made sense back then. I'm not sure if that still applies since a lot of people don't use things like external displays and such with their notebooks. In businesses you do see this. Use cases change over time. For consumers USB dockingstations are enough and these just got better with USB3.1 Gen 2 and USB-C (1 connector to connect everything and charge the notebook). I doubt Apple will go the cheap route, they'll probably leave USB docks to others.
     
  22. windywalks macrumors 6502

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    Mar 12, 2004
    #22
    I am well aware that TB functionality is controller dependent, you didn't bother to read my entire exchange with the OP, and quoted me out of context.

    TB 3 doesn't use USB-C for anything at present, since the functionality over this port hasn't yet been implemented in readily available devices, just announced, to be implemented by the year's end and Q 1 2016.

    The OP asked whether you could use the USB-C connector retroactively for TB devices, to which I replied negatively.
     
  23. windywalks macrumors 6502

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    Mar 12, 2004
    #23
    Do you see Apple officially support external GPUs? Fat chance. Some tedious workarounds maybe.
     
  24. dyn, Aug 15, 2015
    Last edited: Aug 15, 2015

    dyn macrumors 68030

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    #24
    You were not quoted out of context as the entire reply was quoted. If you think it is out of context then it is your own reply lacking said context ;)

    The wording here is completely out of place. Thunderbolt 1 and 2 that are currently out use a connector that is compatible with the mini-DisplayPort connector. Thunderbolt 3 moved away from that. At first they were going with a flatter mini-DisplayPort version that they were already using but eventually they opted to go with USB-C instead. The only port Thunderbolt 3 will be using is USB-C. Since Thunderbolt 3 hasn't been released yet you can't use it at present.

    What you replied here was in the lines of "yes, the MacBook will be able to use Thunderbolt because it uses the same connector". The problem here is your lack of writing skills. Your posts are confusing and not cohesive at all. It's all over the place. Start practicing your writing skills and proofreading your posts as this will prevent confusion.

    The moment Apple starts using Thunderbolt 3 will be the moment they officially support external GPUs because Intel supports it and made it part of Thunderbolt 3. It's in the protocol and if Apple changes it, it may no longer be called Thunderbolt. Now if you actually understood what Thunderbolt is you'd have known that it is actually just PCIe plus some extras. That means that we have the same situation as with the old Mac Pro, maybe even better. Non-Apple GPUs aren't a problem. So technically it'll work because it is supported. Previously it wasn't Apple that was the problem but Thunderbolt and that has been fixed as of Thunderbolt 3.

    Will Apple come out with an external GPU themselves? Highly unlikely. Take a good look at how they do accessories...nearly nothing. What Apple does is leave it up to 3rd parties so it is the other way around: 3rd parties will have to support OS X. Guess what...they already do with the current Thunderbolt and USB offerings. Nvidia has a GPU for the Mac Pro and they also provide the drivers. With Thunderbolt 3 supporting external GPUs I think there will be more demand for it. Btw, there are more things you can do with GPUs, parallel calculations for example. And believe me, there will be solutions like that because Apple isn't the only one using Thunderbolt.

    Btw, it is also incorrect to think that Thunderbolt 3 is in Skylake or that it requires Skylake. It's not part of Skylake nor does it require it. Both are the newest tech out there and simply teamed together because it makes sense to do so (Thunderbolt 3 has too much new stuff going on and has to compete with USB3.1 in some ways thus this teaming is necessary). What this means is that Thunderbolt 3 can also be used an previous generations and newer generations. It also means that just because the machine has Skylake it doesn't mean it also comes with Thunderbolt (MacBook with Skylake but without Thunderbolt).
     

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