Connecting a MacBook Pro to a TV

Discussion in 'Mac Accessories' started by horace528, Jul 15, 2012.

  1. horace528 macrumors regular

    horace528

    Joined:
    May 14, 2011
    #1
    This might seem like a simple question, as you probably will think now that I can just plug in my Mac with a HDMI or VGA cable.
    But this isn't easy as you could think, as this is my teacher's TV, and she uses it to connect her PC to mirror the stuff she's doing on her PC (for easier teaching purposes )
    Anyway, I have to find a way how to mess up her connection to the TV, and at the same time, connect my Mac to the TV to mirror what I'm doing.
    What I mean by this is that I want a way to enable her connection to the TV, and at the same time, enable mine, so that when I finish my presentation, I can just take out my MBP and allow my teacher to continue to mirror her lessons with the TV.
    I'm presentating a Keynote presentation, and I do want to convert the Keynote file into Quicktime so that it would be much easier, but I have some videos in it, and the videos play automatically in the Quicktime video, and I can't pause the video, so I have a problem with that.
    So if you can find 1 one the 2 solutions for the 2 problems (1. How to connect my MBP along with my teacher's connection running fine 2: How to able to play and pause videos in a Keynote presentation in a Quicktime version.)
    You may not understand what I'm saying, and I'm sorry, but please try your best to understand and give me a solution.
    Hope you can find the solution quickly! 
     
  2. MisterMe macrumors G4

    MisterMe

    Joined:
    Jul 17, 2002
    Location:
    USA
    #2
    Young man, unless the TV allows PIP, then you cannot display two images simultaneously [without additional hardware]. However, most modern TVs have multiple source inputs. Many models have up to four HDMI ports. With a miniDisplayPort-to-HDMI adapter, you are golden. Use the TV to either mirror or extend your MacBook Pro's display. Use the TV's remote control or on-set source button to select your MacBook Pro as the TV's video source when you want to make your presentation.
     
  3. horace528 thread starter macrumors regular

    horace528

    Joined:
    May 14, 2011
    #3
    I don't mean mirroring 2 screens at once. I mean that how can I connect my MacBook Pro on the screen for a short time, and when I plug my MBP out, it will automatically come back to my teacher's computer screen.
    Oh, and I found out there is about 3 HDMI ports and a separate reserved-for-PC port in the TV. Can I just plug in my Mac with a HDMI to Mini-Display cable thing? Oh yeah, and do i need a separate cable other than the miniDisplayPort-to-HDMI adapter? (Like a cable)
     
  4. theSeb macrumors 604

    theSeb

    Joined:
    Aug 10, 2010
    Location:
    Poole, England
    #4
    Your post is very confusing. A TV, depending on the model, will have multiple inputs and the ability to select between those inputs. Most recent TVs have a couple of HDMI inputs and some have a VGA input as well.

    How does your teacher connect to the TV?

    You can purchase a miniDP to HDMI adaptor and then connect a HDMI to the TV. Check which HDMI port you're connecting to and then select that input on the TV (either a button on the TV somewhere or on the remote. What TV is it?). Your teacher can remain connected to a different HDMI port or the VGA input, but her display will not be visible. Then, you can choose between the inputs on the TV and switch between her and your computer.
     
  5. horace528 thread starter macrumors regular

    horace528

    Joined:
    May 14, 2011
    #5
  6. JediMeister macrumors 68040

    Joined:
    Oct 9, 2008
    #6
    That adapter and cable should work fine, provided you have a mid-2010 or later MacBook Pro. If you have an earlier generation, you will still need a separate audio cable, and the Mini DisplayPort to HDMI adapter may not even be physically compatible. Mini DisplayPort was introduced to MacBook Pros with the late-2008 and mid-2009 lines, the earlier ones used full-size DVI.
     

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