Considering a 2013 iMac Refurb

Discussion in 'iMac' started by SlyCoug, Oct 17, 2015.

  1. SlyCoug macrumors newbie

    Joined:
    Oct 17, 2015
    #1
    Hello all, I'm new to the forum but considering an iMac to replace my now very outdated mid-2008 MacBook. I'm looking now for a family computer where we can do some light processes such as Office, web browsing, and a light amount of family photo editing. Price is a big consideration so I'm looking at the current refurbs through Apple, which are the 2013 iMacs. Specifically I'm looking at the 2.7 or possibly the 2.9 ghz 21.5 inch models and was hoping for some input on whether getting one of these old models would be a bad purchase for my needs.

    I'm looking to get something that will last us about 6 years, but with our light needs our highest priority is getting good bang for our buck on something reliable where we can keep all of our important family memories and do the processes I mentioned.

    Any input would be much appreciated!
     
  2. mtneer macrumors 68020

    mtneer

    Joined:
    Sep 15, 2012
    #2
    For office, web browsing and occasional amateur picture editing (not your livelihood depends on it types); a refurb iMac should be more than enough for at least the next 4 - 5 years. Just try to nab one with a SSD in it. That will make more of a difference for your user experience than a 200MHz CPU upgrade.
     
  3. jrcsh6 macrumors 6502

    jrcsh6

    Joined:
    Jul 1, 2008
    #3
    I have had 3 reforms. One issue which the store fixed for me. I'd suggest waiting until the next wave of refurbs hit. Since the new iMacs came out the prices should drop as they come through the refurb site. 2013 machines are a little old. Fine for now but if you've got plans for it to last you may want newer.
     
  4. SlyCoug thread starter macrumors newbie

    Joined:
    Oct 17, 2015
    #4
    Thanks for the recommendation. Any guesses on about how long it usually takes before the new refurbs may start to appear?
     
  5. mtneer macrumors 68020

    mtneer

    Joined:
    Sep 15, 2012
    #5
    Over 6 months at least? The 12" retina MacBook, launched in May 15, has not yet showed up in the refurb store. It does not even have that category listed.
     
  6. jrcsh6 macrumors 6502

    jrcsh6

    Joined:
    Jul 1, 2008
    #6
    Yea. It'll be a little while for the current. The time for the older ones to go down is probably pretty soon. That's what I did last time. Bought the newly "old model" as soon as I saw it come up.
     
  7. ryannel2003 macrumors 68000

    ryannel2003

    Joined:
    Jan 30, 2005
    Location:
    Greenville, NC
    #7
    The 2.7GHz model selling for $1059 on the refurb store is a pretty good deal. For what you listed you won't need the extra 200MHz and discrete graphics of the more expensive model. Do note the 21.5" models have a 5400rpm which isn't the end of the world but still much slower than an SSD or 7200rpm hard drive. I think the best value of all the refurb models is the $1439 27" iMac which has a 7200rpm HD, bigger screen, discrete graphics and memory which can be easily upgraded down the road. I just bought this model last month and I love it.
     
  8. jrcsh6 macrumors 6502

    jrcsh6

    Joined:
    Jul 1, 2008
    #8
    I'd suggest the 27 too. Expandable ram will be the key to longevity.
     
  9. SlyCoug thread starter macrumors newbie

    Joined:
    Oct 17, 2015
    #9
    Thank you all for the advice, you have all been very helpful. I'd love to do the 27 but it may be a bit out of my budget. I'll have to take a day or two to really consider whether to do that or save the $400 on the 21.5. I definitely see the benefit of the upgradable RAM and faster HD though, so it's a tough decision!
     
  10. ryannel2003 macrumors 68000

    ryannel2003

    Joined:
    Jan 30, 2005
    Location:
    Greenville, NC
    #10
    If you can wait and see sometimes Apple will have refurb 21.5" models with the fusion drive. They had one listed yesterday for $1359 that had a 1TB Fusion Drive and the discrete nVidia graphics chip.
     

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