Considering Crucial m4 512 SSD

Discussion in 'Mac Pro' started by theBigD23, Jul 10, 2012.

  1. theBigD23 macrumors 6502a

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    Sep 13, 2008
    #1
    I have a 2008 Mac Pro with its original 320 hard drive. Since the new MPs didn't come out, I thought I'd upgrade the hard drive with ML as a fresh install.

    I wanted to ask what you experience has been with the Crucial on any Mac Pro? I also read a concern about SSDs that if the power goes out that it could lead to data loss. Is this the case with the m4? Do I need to get a UPS?

    Any help and advice would be great before I jump head first into an SSD. Thanks!
     
  2. d-m-a-x macrumors 6502

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    Aug 13, 2011
    #2
    i'm sure it is the same as a normal hard drive. Once the data is written, it is there. The memory on phones and cameras are solid state, battery pulls dont erase stuff off the sd card.
     
  3. jefe2000 macrumors newbie

    jefe2000

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    #3
    Crucial m4 & SSDs

    In general, there is no reason to fear power loss when running an SSD. At least, there is no more reason to fear power loss than when running with a traditional spinning platter hard drive. So, you don't need a UPS just because you'll be running an SSD in your machine.

    If you want to know about the Crucial m4 in particular, I'd recommend checking out AnandTech's review. It's quite in depth and very informative:
    http://www.anandtech.com/show/4253/the-crucial-m4-micron-c400-ssd-review
     
  4. d-m-a-x macrumors 6502

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    Aug 13, 2011
    #4
    I like the Crucial, have the 128 gig. Been running 2 weeks without a problem, nice and snappy too.

    I don use a backup battery anymore. Had too many unexpected problems. on shoots, whenever the photo strobes went off - the slight dip in current tripped the surge protector. Since they only give a couple of minutes of protection, just not worth dragging the heavy thing around
     
  5. theBigD23 thread starter macrumors 6502a

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    Sep 13, 2008
    #5
    Thanks for the help. I did read the Anandtech review, but it's quite old. From the Amazon reviews and reading other info on sites like MR, I may take the plunge. I hoped to get the Intel 520, but it's nearly twice the price.
     
  6. jefe2000 macrumors newbie

    jefe2000

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    San Francisco Bay Area
    #6
    Old Review

    True, but no older than the product itself. Save for some firmware updates I think the Crucial m4 hasn't changed much, if at all. AnandTech has also reviewed the firmware updates to the m4 as they've been made available. So, you should be able to get a pretty complete picture of the device, methinks.
     
  7. OrangeSVTguy macrumors 601

    OrangeSVTguy

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    Northeastern Ohio
    #7
    Using an M4 256gb in mine and it's good drive. It's just sitting in the lower optical slot until I get the OWC Mount Pro drive sled for 2.5" HDDs/SSD. I do think you should enable TRIM. There's a free app for that.
     
  8. theBigD23 thread starter macrumors 6502a

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    Sep 13, 2008
    #8
    Will do. TRIM seems to be pretty important.

    Looking forward to the speed bump. I'm just going to wait until ML is released to install a fresh copy of the new OS.

    ----------

    I'm also going to get this:
    http://www.amazon.com/2-5-3-5-Ssd-s...=UTF8&colid=7EQ0X1TS3SXF&coliid=I45EUBSRIT9ED

    If there is anything better, please let me know.
     
  9. OrangeSVTguy macrumors 601

    OrangeSVTguy

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    Sep 16, 2007
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    Northeastern Ohio
    #9
    I'm looking to purchase these. http://eshop.macsales.com/item/OWC/MMP35T25/

    That's a nice solution, just wish they had mounts for another SSD instead of taking up sled. Was going to get a PCIe SATA III/USB 3.0 card anyways to hook up. Maybe I'll just Velcro the other SSD to the bottom lol.

    I want to keep the lower optical bay open for a Power supply to power a couple GTX 570s. Don't want an external box :p
     
  10. dmsmith macrumors newbie

    Joined:
    Jul 17, 2006
    #10
    The kit version (w/ software and cable) has been cheaper than the sdd alone.

    Saw the kit as low as $344 a couple of weeks ago.

    The version of SuperDuper that comes on the disk doesn't work under Lion.

    Be aware that SuperDuper does not clone the recovery partition only the main partition. But that won't matter if you're doing a clean install.

    With a newer MacBook Pro, Lion Internet Recovery is sufficient to do a clean install and put the recovery partition on the sdd. Read up on how to do it on your vintage machine.

    Remember a clean install does not include all of iLife. I had to go to my iLife install disks to get iWeb and iDVD.

    Look forward to a remarkably faster machine and better battery life.
     
  11. deconstruct60 macrumors 604

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    Mar 10, 2009
    #11
    There is a difference between written to the device and written in the persistent storage media. Both HDDs and most SSDs have RAM. The data only written to the RAM is vulnerable. HDDs which cache writes (and RAID controllers with the same tactic) can have the issue.

    Most SSDs at the very least cache the metadata about the logical data block layout they present outside the drive. In the context of a write, the data may need to be stored in the SSD temporarily while other data is gathered to write the data out. In the gap, if the power is lost there can be an issue.

    Some SSDs go to great length to always store the metadata on the flash media as it changes along with the data. Most "higher than average" priced SSDs have one or more capacitors on their motherboard to power the drive long enough in an outage to write the cached data to the persistent storage. Effectively they have their own built in "battery backup".

    However, an external battery back just for the SSD isn't necessary in most situations. If are going to have frequent local black/brow outs the Mac's data/metadata is likely at just as much risk with a SSD as it is with a HDD. Same core issue of data/metadata being cached that hasn't made it all the way down the storage chain.

    It is generally a bad idea though to just yank the power on a mounted and actively written to SSD drive. However, the same is true for a HDD.


    It is not erasing stuff that is the issue. It is losing stuff that never was written. For example, if you take a high end DSLR camera with a buffer and start it shooting a max frame per seconds. Then while in that mode you yank the battery out while actively shooting.... you will likely loose the shoots that are newest into the buffer.

    The upside for most phones and cameras is that is actually hard to yank the battery from them while they are actively in normal use. So the problem doesn't appear often. The firmware in the device will just quit if the battery power sinks below a certain level if loose power due to battery drain.

    P.S. strobes presenting to the "surge protector+ battery back-up " as a brown out seems indicative that there is too much stuff plugged into the same electric circuit. An extension cord to a wall socket on a different circuit would probably work better for the more sensitive electronics.
     
  12. AlexBass macrumors regular

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    Jul 9, 2012
    #12
    Go for Samsung 830. They are more reliable and considerably faster. It'll also stay faster and younger for longer.
     
  13. d-m-a-x macrumors 6502

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    Aug 13, 2011
    #13
    Yup, you lose shots when they are in the buffer and there is power loss whileshooting teherd.

    We (photograhers) are very aware of overloading circuts. Most packs pull 15 amps, so you make sure to distribute them on different circuts. I always plug the computer in as far away as possible. Battery backups are very sensitive, you don't need a brown out for them to trip - all it takes is a very slight dip in current.
     
  14. theBigD23 thread starter macrumors 6502a

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    Sep 13, 2008
    #14
    I'd like that or the Intel, mainly because of Intel's purported reliability. However, the 830 is $275 more and the 520 is about $400 more for less storage.
     
  15. jhero, Jul 11, 2012
    Last edited: Jul 12, 2012

    jhero macrumors 6502

    jhero

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  16. GLS macrumors 6502

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    Jun 26, 2010
    #16
    Good drive for the price; have one in my 2010 Mac Pro. I'm sure there are faster options, but I'm not a spec-whore.

    Be sure and update the firmware (if available). There were some issues with their firmware late last year in these drives, and if you by chance pick up one of these, check what revision it has. Crucial has a iso you can download and create a Mac bootable disc with the firmware integrated.
     
  17. deconstruct60 macrumors 604

    Joined:
    Mar 10, 2009
    #17
    It is a DOS bootable disc that a Mac with an internal ODD and BootCamp enabled EFI can boot. Modern Mac's EFI is already turned on; ancient x86 Macs not so much. You essentially need "a Windows PC" to make it work. That Mac can mimic one with a internal ODD it solves the problem.
     
  18. FastEddiebags macrumors 6502

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    Jun 1, 2012
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    NJ
    #18
    Crucial M4- cheap, good amount of space, and the read and write speed is fast, not the fastest, but definitely the best for the price.Get 2 and run raid 0
     

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