iPad Continuity in iPad 3rd Gen

Discussion in 'iPad' started by watson10, Oct 19, 2014.

  1. watson10 macrumors member

    Joined:
    May 7, 2010
    #1
    I ws under the impression that Continuity was not available for iPad 3rd generation. But, my iPad rings when my iPhone has an incoming call. iPad and iPhone 5 are both running IOS 8.02 How can I turn this off?
     
  2. Trahearne macrumors 6502

    Joined:
    Oct 6, 2014
    #2
    Settings > FaceTime, and you will see how to.
     
  3. watson10 thread starter macrumors member

    Joined:
    May 7, 2010
    #3
    Got it! Thanks. Weird that it was under FaceTime.
     
  4. TheDeviceUser macrumors 6502a

    Joined:
    Jul 20, 2014
    Location:
    U.K
    #4
    Had similar problem. Sounds like a good idea, but it's a nightmare when they all ring together!
     
  5. Night Spring macrumors G5

    Night Spring

    Joined:
    Jul 17, 2008
    #5
    My devices have all been ringing together when I get iMessages, so pretty much used to it by now.
     
  6. Ledgem macrumors 65816

    Ledgem

    Joined:
    Jan 18, 2008
    Location:
    Hawaii, USA
    #6
    Continuity (receiving calls across multiple devices, sending SMS texts with iOS 8.1) should be supported across all devices. Handoff, which Apple has deemed a feature of Continuity and which requires Bluetooth 4.0 Low Energy support, will not work with the iPad 3rd generation. The iPad 3 doesn't have Bluetooth 4.0 support, which is also why it can't use Airdrop. Handoff is the feature that allows you to start an email or other supported document on one device, and then continue it on another.
     
  7. thebucket macrumors newbie

    Joined:
    Jun 7, 2013
    #7
    No, iPad 3 supports Bluetooth 4.0.

    http://support.apple.com/kb/SP647
     
  8. Ledgem macrumors 65816

    Ledgem

    Joined:
    Jan 18, 2008
    Location:
    Hawaii, USA
    #8
    Thanks for the correction, but it doesn't support the "low energy" profile of Bluetooth 4.0. Again, this explains why it doesn't work with Airdrop, nor with Handoff.
     
  9. rui no onna macrumors 601

    rui no onna

    Joined:
    Oct 25, 2013
    #9
    Isn't LE part of Bluetooth 4.0 spec? Apple purposely omits certain features in older models not necessarily because the hardware can't support it but because they want to entice you into upgrading.
     
  10. Ledgem macrumors 65816

    Ledgem

    Joined:
    Jan 18, 2008
    Location:
    Hawaii, USA
    #10
    You're correct, which is partly why I was surprised to read that it had a chipset that did have Bluetooth 4.0. It doesn't work either way: there's no option for AirDrop on my iPad 3, and while I can get Handoff working nicely between my iPhone 5S and my iPad mini 2, the iPad 3 doesn't pick up on it.

    I suspect you're also right in suggesting that this could be an artificial limitation imposed by Apple. After all, they're doing something similar with their Mac line, too. Systems with Bluetooth 4.0 LE chipsets made in 2011 have Handoff disabled; it's possible to modify some system files to remove your system from the "blacklist," and then Handoff works wonderfully. It's quite possible they're doing something similar with their iOS devices. I'd like to think that Apple did this because the features are unstable on the devices they disable them on, but of course, the view of greed is as you said: they do it to force you to upgrade for the newer features.
     
  11. rui no onna macrumors 601

    rui no onna

    Joined:
    Oct 25, 2013
    #11
    The Pebble works fine with Bluetooth LE on an iPhone 4S which was released before the iPad 3. I'm thinking lack of AirDrop and Handoff is most likely an artificial limitation. If you look at this list (http://www.bluetooth.com/Pages/Bluetooth-Smart-Devices-List.aspx), the iPad 3rd gen is included which means it should have Bluetooth LE.
     
  12. macguy78 macrumors member

    Joined:
    Apr 15, 2010
    Location:
    Chicago
    #12
    I was really suprised to find that handoff doesn't work on ipad 3. If there is a technical reason, well fine. Imposing artificial limitations as a sales tactic may work short term, but customers long-term can get pretty tired of it and move on. SalesForce is famous for this. I hope this is not the case with Apple.
     

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