conversion in iTunes

Discussion in 'Mac Apps and Mac App Store' started by tombrownington, Mar 16, 2008.

  1. tombrownington macrumors newbie

    Joined:
    Jan 19, 2008
    #1
    Hi All,
    I have a rather large music library in iTunes which I have just imported and organized from my old pc.
    I would now like to convert my entire library to AAC as it is the native format for macs. I know how to do it - right click and convert selection to AAC.
    However this method creates a converted version without deleting the older one, and try as I may I can't find any option to cut this out.
    What is happening is that my library is getting duplicated unnecessarily and it's a big pain deleting the older files individually.
    Can anyone tell me a smarter way of doing what I want to do - either in iTunes, or by some other way?
    Thanks
     
  2. Erendiox macrumors 6502a

    Erendiox

    Joined:
    Oct 15, 2004
    Location:
    Brooklyn NY
    #2
    Wirelessly posted (Mozilla/5.0 (iPod; U; CPU like Mac OS X; en) AppleWebKit/420.1 (KHTML, like Gecko) Version/3.0 Mobile/4A102 Safari/419.3)

    If I were you I'd gather all my music in the finder, delete my iTunes library file and re-import my music with the settings set to "copy music to iTunes folder" and the conversion set to aac. You'd then end up with all your music copied to your iTunes music folder in aac format.
     
  3. tombrownington thread starter macrumors newbie

    Joined:
    Jan 19, 2008
    #3
    Hi erendiox,
    I tried what you said - not with my entire music library, but with only one album. But it doesn't work.
    I keep a copy of the folder with the songs on my desktop, then delete the songs from my library. Next I import from my desktop: instead of converting to AAC it simply copies the old files back into the library.
    Is there any other way though?
     
  4. TheSpecialist macrumors 6502

    Joined:
    Jun 11, 2007
    Location:
    The Netherlands, Europe
    #4
    This is how I import songs.

    I first download a few albums, and I keep those downloaded albums on my desktop.
    I import them into iTunes (as an MP3).
    Then I edit the ID3 tags, add album art and all those things.
    Then I convert it to 256KBPS AAC.
    Then type in the search bar in iTunes, MPEG.
    I locates the old files, press delete.
    Go to the desktop, delete old files.
    Left over files are the ones you need, the AAC in the iTunes folder.

    Done:apple::D
     
  5. seeker777 macrumors member

    seeker777

    Joined:
    Oct 15, 2007
    #5
    There is a script at Doug's Applescripts for iTunes called "Doug's Actions for iTunes Volume 1" that states one of its actions is to convert to AAC with the option to delete the old file.
     
  6. GimmeSlack12 macrumors 603

    GimmeSlack12

    Joined:
    Apr 29, 2005
    Location:
    San Francisco
    #6
    You do realize that you are kind of wasting your time by converting to AAC right? The thing is that you cannot achieve any better quality than what you already have in the MP3 files. You cannot "gain" sound quality by converting an MP3 to an AAC, you'll only lose sound quality. Think of trying to make a VHS tape look better by burning it to a DVD, no matter what you do you'll only end up with the same or worse quality.

    This is what leads me to say that you're wasting your time, as well as creating less quality files. Mp3 is a good file format, and AAC being the 'native' format of OS X really doesn't mean that it is better (in this case).
     
  7. TheSpecialist macrumors 6502

    Joined:
    Jun 11, 2007
    Location:
    The Netherlands, Europe
    #7
    It can result in smaller file sizes though do to better compressing of AAC.
    I myself can't help it, every file I have is in AAC and I can't stand it if it's MP3 because I see that as inferior.

    AAC ftw m8:apple:;)
     
  8. MacFanBoyIIe macrumors 6502

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    Feb 22, 2008
    #8
    I agree with GimmeSlack12. MP3s work just fine too.
     
  9. TheSpecialist macrumors 6502

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    Jun 11, 2007
    Location:
    The Netherlands, Europe
    #9
    From Wiki.
    "Advanced Audio Coding (AAC) is a standardized, lossy compression and encoding scheme for digital audio. Designed to be the successor of the MP3 format, AAC generally achieves better sound quality than MP3 at many bit-rates.
    AAC's best known use is as the default audio format of SonyEricsson's W890i, Sony's Walkman, Apple's iPhone, iPod, iTunes, and the format used for all iTunes Store audio (with extensions for proprietary digital rights management).
    AAC is also the standard audio format for Sony’s PlayStation 3, Nintendo's WiiPhoto Channel 1.1 update installed for Wiis purchased before late 2007) and the MPEG-4 video standard. HE-AAC is part of digital radioDAB+ and Digital Radio Mondiale."


    Overal it looks like a better format, and a standard in many electronics, and it is the succesor, so why stay on the old format and not choose it's better version? If you have the time do it I say but if your comp is slow, maybe not.
     
  10. MacFanBoyIIe macrumors 6502

    Joined:
    Feb 22, 2008
    #10
    A bunch of "experts" assured me that HD DVD was going to be the successor to DVD.
    Bottom line: if it ain't broke, don't fix it.
     
  11. TheSpecialist macrumors 6502

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    Jun 11, 2007
    Location:
    The Netherlands, Europe
    #11
    I guess you bought an HD-DVD player, that sucks for you;)

    But this is different then HD and Blu-Ray because those cost money and you have to bet, and this is free, and you can also convert back to MP3. But I don't say you have to encode to AAC. I just like it more. But that's me.
     
  12. MacFanBoyIIe macrumors 6502

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    Feb 22, 2008
    #12
    No, I was just showing sympathy for those who did.
     
  13. GimmeSlack12 macrumors 603

    GimmeSlack12

    Joined:
    Apr 29, 2005
    Location:
    San Francisco
    #13
    Agreed. I think AAC is a better format too, but you only gain the benefits when you are ripping from the original source. Converting an MP3 to AAC will net no benefits. Only waste time.
     
  14. Adrenalin Recor macrumors newbie

    Joined:
    Aug 13, 2008
    #14
    SRC Conversion problems

    Hi! I am mixing some tracks which were originally recorded on a 2” studer analogue. They were then put into pro tools LE 24 bit but sadly converted through a 001…
    Although the quality of the AtoD is not good, an enormous amount of exceptional processing took place which can not be repeated, so most of that work is going to be used and will need to be warmed up.

    I will return to the original analogue 2” to A/D a few sections in order to top up the quality and warmth but most of the material will have come from the LE sessions.

    The question is; in order to get the best quality and warmth for the remix, what would people advise, I should SRC them up to 88.2 with? Are there any new CRT’s which give better quality than Barberbatch or Bossetta etc. Any suggestions would be really appreciated,
    thank you in anticipation,
    Mark
     

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