Converting Images To 300 Dpi On Macbook

Discussion in 'macOS' started by berkeleynerd10, Apr 1, 2010.

  1. berkeleynerd10 macrumors newbie

    Joined:
    Apr 1, 2010
    #1
    hi all,

    help please :) i've created charts in excel (2008) and need to save them as picture files of quality at 300dpi for publishing. does anyone know how to do this? and also how to tell at what dpi pictures are saved?

    i was able to save the charts as pictures (jpg format -- tiff wasn't an option), but i can't tell the quality. from what i've researched online, it looks like i might need photoshop to do this?

    any help would be AMAZING!!!!!!!

    berkeleynerd10 :D
     
  2. MisterMe macrumors G4

    MisterMe

    Joined:
    Jul 17, 2002
    Location:
    USA
    #2
    PDF. Perhaps, you've heard of it?
     
  3. berkeleynerd10 thread starter macrumors newbie

    Joined:
    Apr 1, 2010
    #3
    Is there a way to confirm that the chart saved as a PDF is indeed 300 DPI? Sorry for my naivete....
     
  4. MisterMe macrumors G4

    MisterMe

    Joined:
    Jul 17, 2002
    Location:
    USA
    #4
    What is your fascination with 300 dpi raster graphics? PDF is a vector graphics format. It is resolution-independent. This means that PDF graphics print at whatever resolution your printer or typesetter is capable of.

    A 300 dpi raster graphic is only 300 dpi at a specific size. Raster graphic images require a certain amount of care and feeding. If you aren't careful with them, then they can look really crappy when printed.

    Word to the wise: As for as charts and graphs are concerned, Excel is a very blunt instrument. Including Excel charts and graphs makes sense if you are printing a how-to for Excel. If you want to print charts and graphs to illustrate data, then you should use a more capable charting app. OmniGraphSketcher is very inexpensive app that produces graphs the replicate the look of those produced by a professional graphic artist. DeltaGraph's forté is generating presentation-quality graphs from Excel data. There are others. However, Excel produces amateurish graphs at its best. Excel graphs captured as raster graphics goes downhill from there.
     
  5. Buzz Bumble Guest

    Joined:
    Oct 19, 2008
    Location:
    New Zealand
    #5
    One problem here is that many print / publishing companies refuse to accept Microsoft files or even PDFs from Microsoft applications (I'm not sure of the reason, possibly to do with colour separation problems).

    You'd be best to print the graphs to a PDF, but also use the PDF to create TIFF or JPEG images files from Preview, where (from memory) you can specify the the resolution. Send them the whole lot and let them decide - they'll still have to convert them for colour separation.
     
  6. berkeleynerd10 thread starter macrumors newbie

    Joined:
    Apr 1, 2010

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