Could 4 GB DIMM have led to this failure?

Discussion in 'MacBook Pro' started by darwinian, Nov 20, 2008.

  1. darwinian macrumors 6502a

    darwinian

    Joined:
    Jan 4, 2008
    Location:
    In R4, more or less
    #1
    I have a MBP 3,1. It's currently running 2.2 GHz, 200 GB 7200 RPM drive, and 6 GB of RAM. I had a recent, imminent, catastrophic, totalitarian, heart-wrenching failure about a week ago, which I was fortunate to have had repaired by Apple. I am curious about the cause of the failure and whether or not my 4 GB SODIMM might have anything to do with it. The computer has failed on 2 distinct occasions. Here are facts.

    Both failures had this characteristic symptom: power button registered no apparent activity. Holding down power button made something in the machine have a faint clicking noise, which sounded like it was coming from the optical drive. The actual origins were unknown.

    Failure 1: Occurred several months ago, pre-6 GB (but with 2x2 GB SODIMMS that I installed a year ago), during a new hard drive installation. Put in new HDD, would not boot up. Tried to reseat all the connections, no go. Replaced original drive, booted up fine. I concluded at the time that it was the drive, but the company I bought it from tested the drive and said it was fine. The replacement drive they sent worked fine, by the way.

    Failure 2: Occurred imminently the other night, during routine tasks. Swapped memory in and out in various configurations to no avail. Removed the HDD and tested in an external enclosure, worked fine.

    Replacement details: Apple replaced the logic board (605-1790), something graphics related (675-0075), AND both of my 2 GB aftermarket DIMMs (333-0709), which they said did not pass a memory test.

    So ... any ideas what happened, and what the 4 GB DIMM might have contributed?
     
  2. Eidorian macrumors Penryn

    Eidorian

    Joined:
    Mar 23, 2005
    Location:
    Indianapolis
    #2
    Bad RAM isn't going to cause a physical hardware failure. I've gotten bad RAM before and at worst it causes kernel panics or memory errors on boot until you replace it.
     
  3. ayeying macrumors 601

    ayeying

    Joined:
    Dec 5, 2007
    Location:
    Yay Area, CA
    #3
    Ram doesn't cause total system failure. Logic board does. There might be something wrong that shorted the logic board and somehow damaged the other components also
     
  4. 88888888 macrumors 6502a

    Joined:
    May 28, 2008
    #4
    how can we tell whether or not we got bad ram... i might have bad ram.
     
  5. Eidorian macrumors Penryn

    Eidorian

    Joined:
    Mar 23, 2005
    Location:
    Indianapolis
    #5

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