Could pre-installed software on a new macbook pro increase Quality Control?

Discussion in 'MacBook Pro' started by tresnotas, Feb 27, 2011.

  1. tresnotas macrumors newbie

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    Feb 27, 2011
    #1
    I'm getting ready to purchase the higher end 15'' macbook pro, and had this interesting idea to minimize chances of getting a unit with defects, and having to deal with returning it for a new one, and losing time in this process.

    Does anyone know if pre-installed software is installed by actually turning the macbook on, and thereby increasing the chances of Apple catching a possible defect before they ship it to me? Or do they just put in a harddrive that has the software installed, and don't turn the computer on?

    If it's the first one, I'm considering getting the cheapest pre-installed software, iWork, to help minimize chances of getting a defectious unit.

    I'm not sure what kind of a quality control Apple performs before shipping, but apparently some people get defectious units.

    Anyone know the answer to my question?

    I've chatted online with an Apple person, and she said it would be installed by turning it on, but I think she wasn't really sure.

    Any thoughts appreciated.
     
  2. GGJstudios macrumors Westmere

    GGJstudios

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    May 16, 2008
    #2
    All Macs are tested before they're shipped, including turning them on. Software isn't installed by turning it on.
     
  3. sammich macrumors 601

    sammich

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    #3
    Chances are they just install the software by Firewire Target Disk mode. Where they just access the HDD only, barely turning on the computer.
     
  4. Eddyisgreat macrumors 601

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    Oct 24, 2007
    #4
    :apple: isn't some two-bit mom and pop in backwater USA. If you have any issues with your Unit, they'll replace it ASAP. You might even be able to bring it into a store and get a replacement on the spot.
     
  5. Apple OC macrumors 68040

    Apple OC

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    #5
    the amount of defective units is very low ... they sell a ton of these things ... you are being paranoid
     
  6. tresnotas thread starter macrumors newbie

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    Feb 27, 2011
    #6
    Thanks.

    Really appreciate the answers. I think it's true that I'm being a bit paranoid, since I recently had to return a Dell that had multiple issues upon arrival, and I hated dealing with the return and talking to customer support for hours. I basically wasted about 2 weeks getting the laptop, testing, and returning it, and getting my refund, so after this experience I turned to Apple which seems to have a lot better support. I just don't want to deal with this kind of stuff again in a row.

    I would love to exchange it in the store in case of any problem (it would be so quick), but I'm getting a custom version that my local store doesn't have.

    So as I understand, buying the pre-installed software won't provide extra layer of quality control.

    Still though i am wondering, if Apple is turning on the computers and making tests to make sure there are no defects, why do some people get freezes within an hour of turning their computers on? (I've read online in a few places that this has happened to a few people with the new macbook pro 2011). Maybe there was damage during shipment then? Or is it a lack of extended quality control?
     
  7. Apple OC macrumors 68040

    Apple OC

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    #7
    you are reading about a few cases online? ... the cases of 1000s and 1000s of perfect machines is never heard about
     
  8. GGJstudios macrumors Westmere

    GGJstudios

    Joined:
    May 16, 2008
    #8
    It's the nature of electronic components. While you can even extensively test for an hour or more before shipment, when the user starts using it for a longer period of time, parts that are borderline can fail with the heat and extended use. This happens in a very small percentage of units shipped, but it does happen. That's the purpose of warranties. Apple ships over a million Macs every month. Statistically speaking, getting a defective unit is certainly possible, but Apple has a great reputation for taking care of customers.
     
  9. tresnotas thread starter macrumors newbie

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    Feb 27, 2011
    #9
    Yes, the customer support is one of the main reasons I'm going with Apple this time, after reading many great stories about Apple customer support, and many horror stories about other brands' customer support. And I love that you can have an in person talk at an Apple store if you have any problems. It makes a world of a difference compared to talking on the phone.

    Thanks so much, all. I feel more confident with my purchase now.
     

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