Could someone please explain something about n, b and g wifi?

Discussion in 'Mac Basics and Help' started by ss957916, Mar 4, 2010.

  1. ss957916 macrumors 6502a

    Joined:
    Jun 17, 2009
    #1
    I've discovered that pressing alt when clicking the wifi symbol brings up more details.

    I thought the n standard was 5GHz, but at the moment my PHY Mode (?) is 802.11n but it's on channel 2 (2.4GHz).

    Could someone please briefly explain how they differ/what affect they have?

    I'm having massive wifi issues and am trying to better understand all the various settings etc.
     
  2. stridemat Moderator

    stridemat

    Staff Member

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    UK
    #2
    The mode you are currently connected to allows non 'n' computers to connect to the network. The only downside of this is that the 5Ghz network will slow to a 2.5Ghz network when there is a b or g device on the network.

    What are the issues you are having with your WiFi?
     
  3. ss957916 thread starter macrumors 6502a

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    #3
    I thought the Extreme was simultaneous dual band?
     
  4. stridemat Moderator

    stridemat

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    #4
    What age is your extreme? The newer ones are dual, the older ones are not.
     
  5. cube macrumors G5

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    May 10, 2004
    #5
    Option-click the radio mode in Airport Utility for the full list.
     
  6. Peace macrumors Core

    Peace

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    #6
    You need to open the airport utility app and change the wireless network name for 5G to something other than the regular wireless name.

    Like this :
     

    Attached Files:

  7. Intell macrumors P6

    Intell

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    #7
    N can run using 2.4Ghz or 5Ghz. B/G can only do 2.4Ghz. And don't forget the higher the hertz the less range it has. This means the 2.4Ghz will go farther the 5Ghz as long as there is no interference.
     
  8. ss957916 thread starter macrumors 6502a

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    #8
    Why should I do this?
     
  9. stridemat Moderator

    stridemat

    Staff Member

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    #9
    You don'y have to do anything but if you do then all your 'n' capable devices can connect to the faster network, while the others connect to the slower network.
     
  10. DoFoT9 macrumors P6

    DoFoT9

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    #10
    this reason\/\/
    highly doubted that most general users would realise the difference.. but yea
     
  11. ss957916 thread starter macrumors 6502a

    Joined:
    Jun 17, 2009
    #11
    Would anyone be able to explain the basics?

    thanks
     
  12. -aggie- macrumors P6

    -aggie-

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    #12
  13. ss957916 thread starter macrumors 6502a

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    Jun 17, 2009
    #13
    With respect, I do understand how to search the internet but I came to a forum because I was hoping for some discussion.
     
  14. stridemat Moderator

    stridemat

    Staff Member

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    Location:
    UK
    #14
    The link -aggie- posted has all the information you need to understand the different types of networks. If you still have specific points you want to discuss after reading about the subject, we will try our best to answer them.
     
  15. DoFoT9 macrumors P6

    DoFoT9

    Joined:
    Jun 11, 2007
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    Singapore
    #16
    nobody else keen? ok ill explain :D

    im going to presume that you do indeed have the dual band Airport Extreme, and that you have a mixture of 802.11g and 802.11n wireless devices on your home network.

    802.11g, as you might know, runs at 54mbps (theoretical). it uses the 2.4GHz spectrum to send radio waves to other devices. devices that use this technology may be iPhone, iPod Touch, and older MBPs (before Penryn).

    802.11n runs at 300mbs (theoretical) and uses the 5GHz spectrum. all newer apple computers use this technology.

    now, when it comes to Airport Extremes with dual band - you have to manually set it to the dual band settings. otherwise it will run in a mode that allows both 5GHz and 2.4GHz computers to connect to it. i.e. g/n devices alike connect at the g frequency (2.4GHz).

    this has a pretty large impact on performance of the 802.11n computers, instead of the upper limits of 300mbs, its now somewhere around 150mbps.

    if you are just web browsing, sharing music, downloading etc, you wont notice a difference by changing to dual band. but if you stream 1080p movies to your home theatre, copy files across the network constantly, and do large backups to a networked drive - then you probably should use dual band.

    any questions? :)
     

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