CPU frequency without battery

Discussion in 'MacBook Pro' started by caguars, Apr 2, 2014.

  1. caguars macrumors newbie

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    Apr 2, 2014
    #1
    Hi. I have a sh macbook pro A1211 (2.33GHz CPU, 2GB RAM, Radeon X1600). Recently it was swollen battery (the battery was not original, compatible no name battery). I live in a country where prices are very high for a new and original apple battery, apple battery here is how a minimum wage and yet I can not afford another, and I don't want to buy another cheap no name bad battery.
    From what I read on the internet, without battery, the processor would only run at 50% of capacity. I tried to find a program that would show me in real time, maximum frequency of the processor, but I had no luck. I tried iStat Pro, iStat menu, but the CPU frequency does not appear, only shows percentage.
    I have attached a picture of iStat pro, iStat menu, Coolbook. I would like to know if there is any way to see if the processor goes at full speed without battery or not. I do not know if it just me or my Mac goes much slower since has no battery.
     

    Attached Files:

  2. dusk007 macrumors 68040

    dusk007

    Joined:
    Dec 5, 2009
    #2
    Intel Power Gadget is what you need.

    Update: Radeon X1600 sounds like a really old notebook. Intel Power Gadget only works on Sandy Bridge and newer. I don't know of any way for older Intel CPUs outside of just booting up Windows or Linux.
     
  3. Naimfan macrumors 68040

    Naimfan

    Joined:
    Jan 15, 2003
    #3
    Just run it without the battery.

    I've not heard of the CPU being throttled for lack of a battery.

    Remove the battery so it doesn't damage anything.
     
  4. snaky69 macrumors 603

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    Mar 14, 2008
    #4
    The CPU does throttle down to 50% when the battery is removed from the removable-battery macs.

    There used to be a KB article on Apple's website for this but it seems to have been removed as every link I found to it are dead.

    ----------


    Here it is, cached:

    https://web.archive.org/web/20080913210306/http://support.apple.com/kb/HT2332?
     
  5. Naimfan macrumors 68040

    Naimfan

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    Jan 15, 2003
    #5
    Thanks!

    I did not know that.

    OP - I'd still remove the battery to prevent damage.
     
  6. caguars, Apr 2, 2014
    Last edited: Apr 2, 2014

    caguars thread starter macrumors newbie

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  7. chrfr macrumors 603

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    #7
    Yes.
     
  8. caguars thread starter macrumors newbie

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    Apr 2, 2014
    #8
    What should I do to make it work at full speed? Like I say I can't afford to buy another battery.
     
  9. yjchua95 macrumors 604

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    #9
    There is no way. As long as the OS detects that there is no battery installed, it will automatically throttle the CPU to run at half power.
     
  10. snaky69 macrumors 603

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    Mar 14, 2008
    #10
    You can't.
     
  11. maflynn Moderator

    maflynn

    Staff Member

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    Boston
    #11
    That's correct without the battery it will only run at 50% The only way to avoid this it add the battery (or replace it if its dead) back into the computer.
     
  12. caguars thread starter macrumors newbie

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    Apr 2, 2014
    #12
    I read on the internet that coolbook is the answer. I will buy it and try to see if it work.
     
  13. simonsi macrumors 601

    simonsi

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    Auckland
    #13
    I think you miss the point, the MBP throttles the CPU because there isn't enough power available from the charger to run at full CPU.
     
  14. ha1o2surfer macrumors 6502

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    Sep 24, 2013
    #14
    What laptop allows that to happen!? I think Apple should fix that...
     
  15. maflynn Moderator

    maflynn

    Staff Member

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    #15
    Its by design, its not a bug. Its any fairly current MBPs that have a removable battery. I don't know if the rMBPs due this since their batteries are "sealed"
     
  16. yjchua95 macrumors 604

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    #16
    It's not Apple's fault. Every other laptop in the world does the same.

    When operating the CPU at full power, the laptop has to take power from BOTH the charger and also the internal battery.

    That's why the battery will drop by 2-3% even when plugged in, under heavy load.
     
  17. ha1o2surfer macrumors 6502

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    Sep 24, 2013
    #17
    It's usually an Apple design. The T420, the W530, my 14 inch gaming laptop G46vw, does NOT allow battery draining under full load because the power supply is designed with the proper wattage in mind (in my gaming laptop's case 180 watts and it actually can charge under full load unlike the rMBP). All those laptops will not throttle performance if the battery is removed.

    I would call that faulty and so will most PC owners. I also own a rMBP and that is disappointing. not that I'm allowed to remove the battery though :p
     
  18. simonsi macrumors 601

    simonsi

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    #18
    Why? Using a laptop as an immobile device powered only by mains defeats the point. Apple choose to use a smaller and lighter charger which will be better suited for the primary intended purpose.

    Its by design so by definition isn't "faulty".
     
  19. caguars thread starter macrumors newbie

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    Apr 2, 2014
    #19
    I bought coolbook I put values ​​1837Mhz and 2338Mhz 0.9500V with 1.0625V. This setting gave kernel panic during Geekbench test, I gave restart and put in 2338Mhz with 11250V. cpu value change during test up to 2338 Mhz.

    Geekbench http://browser.primatelabs.com/geekbench3/506372

    Now it seems cpu is running at full speed.:)
     
  20. ha1o2surfer macrumors 6502

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    Sep 24, 2013
    #20
    you're right it's by design. I was just over reacting, personally I haven't seen any other laptop do this so that was my point I guess..
     
  21. duffyanneal macrumors 6502a

    duffyanneal

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    ATL
    #21
    You just need to look a little. This problem has been noted on just about every major notebook manufacturer. I first discovered it a few years ago on a Lenovo. I believe it really became apparent with the Intel Core CPUs. They have a large dynamic frequency range which can introduce some very large transient power draws. It really depends on the combination of CPU, GPU, display, etc.. Get the right combo and it was very easy to develop a power spike that exceeded the battery rating. As a safety measure manufacturers throttled the CPU speed while on battery. You don't see it as much now because the modern core processors are much more power efficient.
     
  22. simonsi macrumors 601

    simonsi

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    #22
    ...and batteries getting better but the reason you can't run on charger only is Apple design it that way to reduce the charger size....
     
  23. duffyanneal macrumors 6502a

    duffyanneal

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    #23
    A quad core notebook with decent graphics card can draw close to 180 W or more of power. The power adapter weighs a couple of pounds (2/3 weight of a 13" rMBP) and is about the same volume as 4 15" rMBP chargers. I've had to use a couple of workstation machines over the years and they are not much fun to travel with.
     

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