Create custom resolutions for your HDTV display

Discussion in 'Mac Basics and Help' started by OpenAreas, Oct 27, 2009.

  1. OpenAreas macrumors newbie

    Joined:
    Sep 26, 2009
    #1
    Basically on windows vista, the nvidia control panel let me create custom resolutions for my HDTV display. Is this possible in Mac OS X Snow Leopard?
     
  2. jaw04005 macrumors 601

    jaw04005

    Joined:
    Aug 19, 2003
    Location:
    AR
    #2
    Let me guess? 720p TV?

    Google DisplayConfigX and SwitchResX. It’s not quite as easy on the Mac side.
     
  3. OpenAreas thread starter macrumors newbie

    Joined:
    Sep 26, 2009
    #3
    No i have a 1080p TV. Its running at 1920x1080 fine. But i'd like to lower it slightly but not to 1600x res!
     
  4. OpenAreas thread starter macrumors newbie

    Joined:
    Sep 26, 2009
    #4
    Both useless and horrible applications.
     
  5. RubbishBBspeed macrumors regular

    Joined:
    Aug 1, 2009
    #5
    I'm assuming you are meaning a sizeable TV 32inch or larger. This kind of lends itself to the big debate. tv vs monitor. Have you much experience of using the tv close up. Most people tend to complain about headaches after an hour or two of use. Most decent companies have it in there I.T policy that all screen are to be monitors and not tv when extended periods of viewing will exceed 30 minutes or at a distance less than 8ft. (repercussions from health & safety).

    The 1080 resolution on say a 40 inch tv is really designed to be viewed from a distance in-excess of 6ft. Ideally 8ft. and is more for general viewing than concentration on small areas, reading text for example. Monitors left the 1080 standard years ago and even then where more capable than a lot of the most advanced tv's of today.
     
  6. mkrishnan Moderator emeritus

    mkrishnan

    Joined:
    Jan 9, 2004
    Location:
    Grand Rapids, MI, USA
    #6
    In my experience they work reasonably well -- when I had to program my GMA-based PC to fit my HDTV's resolution, I actually had to get the numbers from the ones made by SwitchResX on my Mac (editing DTD files for the GMA wasn't quite as easy as the Nvidia process seems to be).

    Why do you consider them useless? Your other option of course is to go home and pout... :p
     
  7. jaw04005 macrumors 601

    jaw04005

    Joined:
    Aug 19, 2003
    Location:
    AR
    #7
    You might as well get over your dislike of SwitchResX and DisplayConfigX. I agree they’re not the most intuitive of applications. However, that’s what you have to do on the Mac side to get custom resolutions.

    Apple insists on creating the video card drivers for Mac OS X for stability purposes. Therefore, many of the advanced video card tools and features that NVIDIA and ATI ship on the Windows side are simply unavailable on the Mac.
     
  8. tempusfugit macrumors 65816

    Joined:
    May 21, 2009
    Location:
    Chicago
    #8
    It sort of upsets me that I can do more with custom ratios on a 5 year old Ubuntu box than with my MBP....
     
  9. jb510 macrumors regular

    jb510

    Joined:
    Sep 19, 2007
    #9
    I currently have nearly the exact same problem. I need to eliminate the overscan on a 720p HDTV.

    Is one of those apps, SwitchResX and DisplayConfigX, better than the other? Can either display a test resolution of 1248x704 before buying it? DisplayConfigX doesn't seem to be able to show it to me first. I'd like to know it'll actually work before I pay for it...

    Is there really no plist or something anywhere that one could simply add a custom resoltution to?

    FWIW, the 1:1 mode (PC-WIDE) on my Samsung leaves black borders on all four sides. It did the same thing in Windows (old HTPC, Mini is my new HTPC), although I could use the regular WIDE TV mode and set a custom resolution in the ATI control panel to compensate for the overscan. That looked great, you'd never know it was slightly scaled and my menu bar actually showed. Most of the time I VNC/Screen Share into the mini anyway, but I still don't like the overscan.
     

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