Creating Partitions = Speed Up

Discussion in 'Windows, Linux & Others on the Mac' started by KJmoon117, Jun 27, 2011.

  1. KJmoon117 macrumors 6502a

    Joined:
    Jun 10, 2007
    Location:
    NC
    #1
    This question doesn't relate solely to Windows on a Mac but I currently live in Korea, where all the laptops that are ship comes with the hard drive partitioned into C and D.

    My friends have been saying that this partition allows for a safe back, which I can understand if Windows goes down the drain. But they also tell me that moving all your big files and etc into the D partition (movies, docs/pictures/etc) will make the computer run faster. I really don't think this is true...

    What your take on it?
     
  2. balamw Moderator

    balamw

    Staff Member

    Joined:
    Aug 16, 2005
    Location:
    New England
    #2
    I'm personally not a fan of partitions anymore.

    I used to use them all the time in my Linux days and tried to force Windows to use a similar scheme, but many apps would ignore that and use C: anyway. The partitions would then become a liability as one of them would invariably be too small.

    So I have quit trying. I like the flexibility that comes with a single, free-flowing partition.

    NTFS and HFS+ are far more robust than FAT32 so I don't fear file system corruption as much anymore...

    B
     
  3. vistadude macrumors 65816

    Joined:
    Jan 3, 2010
    #3
    To some degree, it is true. If you have like 50 folders in my documents or 100 programs in the start menu, opening either will take a long time. I think this is a function of searching folders. The same is true if you have a lot of files stored in the desktop. Every so often windows will "refresh" the icons and you get a funny lag while the icons recolor.

    However for the most part I don't think it matters as long as you don't populate the start menu, docs folder, or desktop with too many files. For a single OS computer, I prefer a single partition. For a dual boot computer, I do prefer a 3rd partition for data, even though it could cause corruption problems later on (I tend to back up data regularly).
     
  4. balamw Moderator

    balamw

    Staff Member

    Joined:
    Aug 16, 2005
    Location:
    New England
    #4
    I thought about mentioning this, and kind of alluded to it in my final comment.

    FAT32 doesn't scale well and suffers particularly from this kind of slowdown. However, in my experience, creating a new folder on NTFS is just as efficient as creating a new partition due to the way the folder structure is stored and traversed.

    There are many other ways of getting shared data space, like Dropbox or NAS which scale better to multi-machine and platform systems.

    B
     
  5. KJmoon117 thread starter macrumors 6502a

    Joined:
    Jun 10, 2007
    Location:
    NC
    #5
    Thanks for the replies guys.

    So it won't hinder performance at all if I merge C and D in Windows 7 right? Also I won't be wrong if I keep telling my friends that partitioning C yields almost no performance gains.

    It's not the matter of keeping files on the desktop per se. But keeping Data and application in separation partitions, on a single hard drive.
     

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