cross-platform presentation app for Steve Jobs type keynote slides

Discussion in 'Mac Apps and Mac App Store' started by booyahbooyah, Dec 25, 2011.

  1. booyahbooyah macrumors regular

    Joined:
    Sep 11, 2011
    #1
    Hey Folks,

    I use both Windows 7 and Mac OS X Lion. At work it's always Windows 7 though.

    I love the beauty, simplicity, graphics and transitions in Steve Jobs's keynote presentation slides. (The grey-blue background, the glowing fonts, etc.)

    I need tips on how to re-create those kinds of slides using some cross-platform app, one that can work on both Windows and Mac. Cloud-based is okay.

    If someone can teach me how to achieve that effect in Powerpoint that'll be sweet because my employer gives me Powerpoint.

    Thanks in advance.
     
  2. miles01110 macrumors Core

    miles01110

    Joined:
    Jul 24, 2006
    Location:
    The Ivory Tower (I'm not coming down)
    #2
    Not possible to duplicate the animation features with Powerpoint, but it hardly matters because Powerpoint (or Keynote) presentations are a poor way of presenting information in the first place.
     
  3. meget macrumors member

    Joined:
    Dec 21, 2011
  4. miles01110 macrumors Core

    miles01110

    Joined:
    Jul 24, 2006
    Location:
    The Ivory Tower (I'm not coming down)
    #4
    That's not the point. ":rolleyes:" The point is that you shouldn't waste time or money jazzing up your slides with animations, clip art, music, fonts, etc. because a) nobody cares and b) it doesn't help you get your point across any better.
     
  5. hehe299792458 macrumors 6502a

    hehe299792458

    Joined:
    Dec 13, 2008
    #5
    Keynote is just about the last thing that I need from my Mac before I can fully transition to Windows 7. For me, I virtualize OS X on my Windows machine in order to get to Keynote.
     
  6. meget macrumors member

    Joined:
    Dec 21, 2011
    #6
    That much I agree on ;) I never use animations for my company slides :p
     
  7. booyahbooyah, Jan 11, 2012
    Last edited by a moderator: Jan 11, 2012

    booyahbooyah thread starter macrumors regular

    Joined:
    Sep 11, 2011
    #7
    miles-whatever... I ask a question about how to do slides like Steve Jobs on a Win 7 platform, and you're essentially saying that I shouldn't want to do slides like Steve Jobs. Why don't you go write a blog or something instead of bothering people on these forums?
     
  8. MisterMe, Jan 11, 2012
    Last edited by a moderator: Jan 11, 2012

    MisterMe macrumors G4

    MisterMe

    Joined:
    Jul 17, 2002
    Location:
    USA
    #8
    You asked for a better way. miles0110 gave you a better way in the form of superb advice. You reject his wisdom, but required 15 days to decide that your are angry?

    I have to give it to you--you are not quick to anger.
     
  9. davidjearly macrumors 68020

    davidjearly

    Joined:
    Sep 21, 2006
    Location:
    Glasgow, Scotland
    #9
    No, he asked for no such thing. Perhaps you should re-read the first post?

    He asked for tips on how to create a particular effect across two computing platforms. Regardless of what you, or miles think of the question, neither of you have actually helped the OP, but rather, both of you have come across as condescending. ;)

    To the OP, to my knowledge there is no way to recreate some of the Keynote effects in Powerpoint using an actual presentation format (e.g. .ppt). What you could do, is create your presentation in Keynote and then export it as a Quicktime movie. This will require the PC to have Quicktime installed.
     
  10. MisterMe macrumors G4

    MisterMe

    Joined:
    Jul 17, 2002
    Location:
    USA
    #10
    My bad. I conflated the OP with meget. It was meget who asked for the better way. meget seemed to understand that what booyahbooyah was asking for was a bad idea.

    I must disagree with your contention that miles0110 did not help the OP. The OP wants to make some classic PowerPoint mistakes with Keynote presentations. Nobody but nobody wants to be subjected to overly animated slides. The OP will rise in the esteem of his audience if he takes the advice he was given. There is no question that he has a right to do what he wants to do. However, he also has a right to smash his thumb with a hammer. However, he would be better served by bowing to the wisdom of those more knowledgeable.
     
  11. arkitect macrumors 601

    arkitect

    Joined:
    Sep 5, 2005
    Location:
    Bath, United Kingdom
    #11
    (My bold added)
    I have reread the OP a few times now and I do not see where he or she asked for "overly animated slides".
    In fact all that was written was:
    It seems other people decided the OP wants to go overboard.
     
  12. davidjearly macrumors 68020

    davidjearly

    Joined:
    Sep 21, 2006
    Location:
    Glasgow, Scotland
    #12
    This.

    It also seems that the concept of not coming across as arrogant is too much for MisterMe.
     
  13. Mal macrumors 603

    Mal

    Joined:
    Jan 6, 2002
    Location:
    Orlando
    #13
    OP, you can create similar looks in PowerPoint manually, and even save your custom themes for later usage. For the background gradients, you can create them manually in the Slide Background options, just set it to be a top-to-bottom gradient, make the bottom one black or nearly black, and set the top just a bit lighter (play with it to get the right look). I don't know if you can get the subtle glow that Keynote can for text, but you can put a white drop shadow that's blurred on text to create a similar look. I haven't used PowerPoint in a while, so I'm not 100% sure how to get all those options.

    For transitions, I would just stick to the standard dissolve most of the time, you can try subtle animations on a slide for items coming in, I think you already know not to make them too apparent, which sometimes means making a new object move just slightly as it comes in, or pulling a part of an image out and fading the rest of it away (requires cropping it and/or using separate images, you'll have to play with that as well).

    Use the cleanest fonts you can, but Windows font rendering is poor compared to the Mac, so don't expect the fonts to look quite as good. Some of them can come close, though. Again, look through what you have. Find two or three serif fonts and two or three sans-serif fonts that you like and are clean, and never deviate from them unless you have a very specific reason.

    jW
     

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