cutting a doc: external drive choice?

Discussion in 'Digital Video' started by auslander, Feb 22, 2008.

  1. auslander macrumors newbie

    Joined:
    Feb 22, 2008
    #1
    I am going to cut a documentary on a MacBook Pro (2.33Ghz Intel Core Duo, 2GB 667 MHz DDR2 SDRAM), using FCP 6.

    I've got about 13 hours of source material on MiniDV. It looks like it'll take about a terabyte to digitize it uncompressed. I am thinking about buying a Glyph gt050q to store it all on, in part because of the esata connection. Digitizing all the material on one 1 terabyte Glyph won't allow me the option of RAID-ing the drive for redundancy.

    I want to avoid any hickups in playing out 30 minutes of video, graphics, and titles at a time.

    Any advice/warnings/solutions re: this plan?

    Thanks!
     
  2. LethalWolfe macrumors G3

    LethalWolfe

    Joined:
    Jan 11, 2002
    Location:
    Los Angeles
    #2
    Capturing DV as uncompressed is a whole lot of extra effort w/o much benefit. Why not captured it native (which would bout about 170gigs)? After you've locked your edit you can copy and paste the timeline into an uncompressed (or ProRes) timeline to do color correction, add gfx, etc.,.

    Many people are fond of the g-tech and caldigit drive options.


    Lethal
     
  3. AviationFan macrumors 6502a

    AviationFan

    Joined:
    Jan 12, 2006
    Location:
    Cedar Rapids, IA
    #3
    I agree with Lethal - I see no reason to store your footage as uncompressed DV. It's been compressed when the camera wrote it to the tape, so the damage is done. Changing the format now will not result in better quality.

    - Martin
     
  4. CmdrLaForge macrumors 68040

    CmdrLaForge

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    around the world
    #4
    Could you explain that a little bit ? Or where can I find more infos about it ?

    Thanks
    LaForge
     
  5. zioxide macrumors 603

    zioxide

    Joined:
    Dec 11, 2006
    #5
    Yeah, those are good. Also, since the OP is just using standard DV he doesn't need a RAID, so a WD My Book Studio (Firewire 800) or another firewire 800 desktop drive (like a seagate) will also work fine. :)
     
  6. LethalWolfe macrumors G3

    LethalWolfe

    Joined:
    Jan 11, 2002
    Location:
    Los Angeles
    #6
    Sure. Your DV footage is already compressed so there's nothing you can do to bring that "lost" image information back, but by applying gfx (which get killed by DV compression) or doing color correction in an uncompressed timeline you are avoiding working in the world of DV compression unnecessarily. If you are just mastering back to DV tape there's no point in working in an uncompressed (or ProRes or DVCPro 50) timeline because it's all going to get compressed into DV anyway. But if you are going to record back to a higher quality tape format, make a DVD, or make a file for the web you'll probably benefit from working in a higher quality sequence when you do your "finishing pass" (final gfx, color correction, etc.,.).

    For example, let's say you make graphic in photoshop that you then bring into your FCP project (which is destined to be distributed on DVD). If you bring that graphic into a DV timeline and then you encode that DV timeline onto a DVD the graphic is getting compressed twice. But if you do all of your final work in a higher quality timeline then the graphic only takes a big quality hit once (when you make the DVD). So although working in a higher quality timeline can't make your DV footage look better, it can help avoid unnecessary compression that would make your project look worse than it should.

    Sorry if I didn't explain this clearly. It's late after a long day.:eek:


    Lethal
     
  7. CmdrLaForge macrumors 68040

    CmdrLaForge

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    #7
    Hello Lethal,

    thanks a lot for the detailed info. Do you know a good resource that explains the overall workflow?

    I am asking because I am working on a doc myself right now and I want to distribute it.

    You said that the final cut will be made in the DV timeline including all images and then you create a new sequenz in the ProRes Format to do the color grading. Is that correct ?
     
  8. theWholeTruth macrumors member

    Joined:
    Sep 27, 2006
    #8
    Not to butt in on LethalWolfe's always excellent advice, but the workflow would be as follows. Capture your miniDV tapes via FW at the DV NTSC 48K setting. Edit your piece including gfx, effect, titling, etc. When you've locked picture, (don't have to have your audio locked if you don't want), copy your sequence and paste it into an uncompressed or prores timeline. you can go to sequence settings to find the uncompressed or prores setting. Then finalize any gfx, titling, and effects. Master to tape or disc.

    Or if you have the budget, take your finished sequence to a post-house to do the online edit. you will get varying prices depending on which system is used to do the online edit. On a doc I cut in 2005, HD for PBS broadcast, the post-house offered us the option of finishing in a final cut hd suite, or two different avid suites (symphony or ds). we had uncompressed gfx in after effects and elected to use smoke for a majority of the special fx. fcp was by far the cheapest alternative, defintitely affordable for an independent.
     
  9. CmdrLaForge macrumors 68040

    CmdrLaForge

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    #9
    Thanks a lot - thats an excellent advice. I guess I don't have the budget for a post house but I will do my very best.
     
  10. Mr B macrumors member

    Mr B

    Joined:
    Oct 16, 2006
    Location:
    Washington DC
    #10
    lethal,
    Is there a difference bewteen copy and pasting to a Prores timeline vs. choosing Prores as the Compression settings in sequence settings (while still being in your original DV timeline) and rendering?
     
  11. LethalWolfe macrumors G3

    LethalWolfe

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    Jan 11, 2002
    Location:
    Los Angeles
    #11
    If your project is pretty big you can always use the Media Manager tool to create a new project w/new media of just what's in the final cut. This can help w/organization and speed as you won't have a massive project weighing you down anymore.


    I don't know how effective this would be as Pro Res and DV use slightly different frame sizes and just changing the seq compression setting would make a kind of "franken-sequence" that would probably cost you real-time performance.


    Lethal
     
  12. bigbossbmb macrumors 68000

    bigbossbmb

    Joined:
    Jul 1, 2004
    Location:
    Pasadena/Hollywood
    #12
    If you are going out to Color, it would be better to edit in a native DV sequence and send that out. In the Color Project Settings you can have it export ProRes and create a ProRes timeline back in FCP.

    Otherwise, I would probably leave the sequence settings to match the source material.
     

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