D-Day 70th Anniversary

Discussion in 'Current Events' started by MacNut, Jun 6, 2014.

  1. MacNut macrumors Core

    MacNut

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    #1
    They risked their lives storming the beaches of Normandy to rid the world of tyranny. If not for their bravery we might not be free today. The world owes everything to these men that allowed us to keep our freedoms today.
     
  2. iMacBooked macrumors 6502a

    iMacBooked

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    #2
    That part of history we'll never forget. These men will live forever in our hearts.
    [​IMG]
     
  3. macs4nw macrumors 601

    macs4nw

    #3
    We do indeed owe them a debt of gratitude. As of earlier this year, there are actually still over 1400 men, who fought in WWll, alive; most of them in their nineties.

    We shall remember with gratitude those who gave their lives, and salute with gratitude those who risked their lives for our freedom, but were lucky enough to survive the hell that is war.
     
  4. rdowns macrumors Penryn

    rdowns

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    #4
  5. iMacBooked macrumors 6502a

    iMacBooked

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    #5
    Amazing!
     
  6. ucfgrad93 macrumors P6

    ucfgrad93

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    #6
  7. rdowns macrumors Penryn

    rdowns

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    #7

    Can you imagine the memories that must have flooded his mind as he was falling?
     
  8. MacDawg macrumors P6

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    #8
    Truly grateful for the sacrifices made by those who lost their lives and those who lost their loved ones
     
  9. rhett7660 macrumors G4

    rhett7660

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    #9
    One can only imagine!!!!!!!!! Man o Man.....
     
  10. ucfgrad93 macrumors P6

    ucfgrad93

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    #10
    I couldn't even begin to imagine what he was thinking or feeling. What an amazing man.
     
  11. bradl macrumors 68040

    bradl

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    #11
    I believe when he was asked how the jump went, he said it was easier than the first time. He wasn't getting shot at.

    Sometimes, the (much older) vets have a wicked sense of humor. Gotta love and respect it! :)

    BL.
     
  12. Scepticalscribe Contributor

    Scepticalscribe

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    #12
    Absolutely awesome, indeed. What a wonderful story, and what a fantastic (uplifting and life affirming) sense of humour.

    The D-Day 70th anniversary commemorations themselves are deeply moving, and extraordinarily interesting.

    I read another wonderful tale in the British media of a chap - a D-Day veteran - who 'broke out of' the nursing home he was in, wearing a blazer, along with a raincoat over the blazer, and, inevitably, on the blazer, his chestful of wartime decorations, whereupon he proceeded to meet up with some wartime buddies (clearly by arrangement) and travelled with them to France by bus in order to attend the commemorations in person. The nursing home was phoned - by the buddies - who promised to return him safely afterwards…...
     
  13. snberk103 macrumors 603

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    #13
    The point of this story is the sense of humour the WWII vets have. However the background may also be of interest.

    At my bachelor party, in 1995 as a 30-something year old I invited my best friend's father and my uncle. Both vets.

    My uncle had been in the US army - not in Normandy but as part of the Italian campaign. He attempted to volunteer - though nearly legally blind - and after several (deserved!) rejections finally memorized the eye chart and was accepted. His first assignment was to analyze photographs of bomb damage. Luckily he was reassigned to other duties before he did too much harm to the Allied Campaign. I knew him as a jolly, shortish, overweight man. He had the inevitable clash with his 18 y/o son who was fit, athletic, and had a good foot on my uncle. During the fight my cousin made the mistake of asking his father which army was going to help him enforce whatever rule it was, and pushed my uncle. His father (my uncle) had him pinned on the floor in no time flat. His father and the US Army was the answer. For the record they were very close and loving - and that incident probably only strengthened the bond.

    My best friend's father was in the Canadian Army, and was in Normandy on D-Day plus +2 (iirc) as a truck driver. More stories there that I won't relate...but whey you saw him in his grey trousers and blue blazer and medals... His pride radiated.

    Back to the party. Large table of young guys and these vets, young pretty waitress.... and it's the vets who are the most shameless flirts. Including the line... "Have you ever dated a World War II Vet?"

    Still brings a smile for me. Both gone now... but I think fondly of them often. And I thank them.
     

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