d90 lens

Discussion in 'Digital Photography' started by avingochea, May 19, 2009.

  1. avingochea macrumors member

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    #1
    Hey guys, I'm just starting to get into photography, and I bought a Nikon d40x. Well My question is if the nikon d90 uses the same type of EXPENSIVE lense that the d40x uses? I might sell my d40x for the d90 if the lenses are a bit cheaper, I figure it'll pay for itself? Thanks.
     
  2. toxic macrumors 68000

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    #2
    the D90 doesn't require AF-S lenses, if that's what you're asking
     
  3. hltjr macrumors newbie

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    #3
    The d40x and d90 both use interchangeable lenses, so it's a bit difficult to answer your question correctly. Are you referring to the sensors or lenses like your post suggests?
     
  4. peapody macrumors 68040

    peapody

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    #4
    I don't think the kit lenses are the same.

    A quick google says that the d40x comes with the 18-55mm while the d90 comes with the 18-105mm. I don't think going for the d90 just for the lens would be the most logical route :confused:.


    EDIT: ahh I get your question now.

    You are somewhat limited in the lenses with the d40x, but a lot of the new lenses coming out are AF-S anyway.
     
  5. compuwar macrumors 601

    compuwar

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    #5
    The lenses are all Nikon F-mount lenses. The (basic) difference is that the D90 will autofocus with older AF-D lenses, both on the used market and for the few lenses that Nikon hasn't yet converted to AF-S versions. Given the difficulty of selling a used D40x for a good price, it'll only pay for itself if you're going to spend significant money on a lens that either doesn't have an AF-S version or a Sigma HSM equivalent that's about as good and not significantly more- for instance, an 80-200 AF-D doesn't cover the delta compared to an 80-200 AF-S, but if your only choice was a 70-200 AF-S, then the spread would be covered. So, you'd have to figure out what lenses you wanted to get, what their alternatives where, then do the math.
     
  6. avingochea thread starter macrumors member

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    #6
    As always, thanks for the quick responses.

    Yeah, I read that the D40x doesn't have an autofocus motor in the camera? So I have to buy lenses that have the motor in them. But the D90 does have this motor in the camera, so I could buy cameras without the motor, hence making them alot cheaper? And as for the resell value of the camera, I would be selling it to my cousin for pretty close to what I paid for it. What do you guys think?
     
  7. compuwar macrumors 601

    compuwar

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    #8
    You could, but the price difference between those two lenses isn't simply the motor. One's got IF, and more elements and probably a better level of performance than the other. Without taking all of that into account, it's difficult to know which lens is worth what. AF speed is also an issue with some types of shooting.
     
  8. avingochea thread starter macrumors member

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    #9
    Whats If? and what do you mean by elements? Sorry.. It looks like I should probably go read up on lenses lol. Thanks Compuwar for the quick responses
     
  9. ChrisA macrumors G4

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    #10
    A lot of confusion here. But it really is simple. Just two things to remember...

    (1) any lens that works on the D40 will work just the same on the D90. No exceptions.

    (2) In addition the D90 can also make use of non AF-S lenses because the D90 has an in-body focus motor. This opens up the use of fast primes and in a few cases a lower priced version of some zooms. One example is the 80-200 f/2.8 would work on the D90 and costs a LOT less then the 70-200 f/2.8 that you'd put on the D40. But this is really an apples or oranges comparison. It's as if the D90 can use both kinds of fruit while the D40 uses only oranges. Neither fruit is cheaper of better but it is better to be able to use both.

    About paying for itself, Yes it can if you want an F/2.8 200mm zoom then the D90 can use a older version of the 80-200 which sells used for about $650 while the D40 would require s newer 70-200. for about twice the price. But the 70-200 is a slightly better lens with more features. But if the only features that matter to you are the f/2.8 and 200mm it really is the same thing at half the price. With an SLR you have to step back and look at the total system and price that.
     
  10. avingochea thread starter macrumors member

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    #11
    Wow, That made complete sense. Thanks alot! Do you know of a good site to read about lenses? and about what the differences are? I really appreciate that you took the time to explain that to me. I'll be just taking pictures to take pictures, I don't wanna really go anywhere with it. So what would you suggest I do? Keep the D40x, or get the D90?
     
  11. cube macrumors G5

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    #12
    You can find a lot of used lenses in great condition that will autofocus on the D90, but not the D40/D40x/D60/D5000.
     
  12. Phrasikleia macrumors 601

    Phrasikleia

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    #13
    My favorite site for lens information is SLR Gear. They provide very informative charts that allow you to check the sharpness of a lens in objective terms. They also provide a subjective summary, but you can find that sort of thing on many review sites.

    The "blur index charts" are included for any lens that has "(Tested)" after its name. They use a scale running from 1-12 that is color coded for easy reading. Hot pink is the best and is also lower on the scale. So if you see hot pink in the middle and blue, raised corners, that means: sharp center, soft corners. Easy to read!

    [Edit: Oh, by the way, you have to click on a blur index chart to get its applet to open. Then you can adjust the sliders to see the changes at different apertures and focal lengths.]
     
  13. ChrisA macrumors G4

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    #14
    Deside on which lens(es) you want first. Then if one of those is non-AFS buy the D90. For example if you really want an 85mm f/1.4 lens then you'd need the D90 but if the new AF=-S version of the 50mm lens is what you want then it will work on the D40.

    When some one looks at one of your photos it will be very hard, maybe imposable, for them to guess which SLR body was used for the shot but many times you can see which lens was used, for example if I see razor thin DOF, it was not shot with a kit f/5.6 lens. Buy the body that fits the lenses you like.
     
  14. avingochea thread starter macrumors member

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    #15
    Thanks a lot guys.

    Thanks I'll check that out!

    Thanks a lot, I see what you mean. I'll decide whether to keep the D40x or not after I do some reading on lenses. Thanks again guys. I really do appreciate it.
     
  15. compuwar macrumors 601

    compuwar

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    #16
    Are you saying that the AF-S 80-200 wouldn't work on the D40? You rarely find an 80-200 selling for less than about $800 if it's in great condition, unless it's the really old push-pull (I have one.) The AF-S version goes for about $230 more than the AF-D version, and the 70-200 is about $600 more than that (more than twice the 80-200, but it has VR.) Also, the D40 can use the AF-D version fine in manual focus mode, which if you're shooting around infinity really doesn't make things that bad- so it's not accurate that the D40 *requires* a newer lens, and I can't see any reason the D40 couldn't use the AF-S version of the 80-200.

    Finally, it's worth looking at the Sigma 70-200 HSM II if you're looking at the 80-200, since out to the APS-C sensor edge the current AF-S Nikkor looks to be about the same in resolution and maybe a bit worse in contrast (it wins out to FX though.) The Sigma will almost certainly be better than the original "cheap" 80-200s, especially given the change in ED glass and optical coatings since the older 80-200 was designed.

    Even if you just shoot at 200mm at f/2.8, you're not comparing apples to apples with either of the 80-200 AF-D lenses, the 80-200 AF-S lens, the 70-200VR or either of the Sigma 70-200 HSM lenses, and only the older two Nikkors won't AF on a D40- but if your'e trading in a D40 and buying a D90, you probably just made the middle-priced lenses less expensive on the D40 than cheaping out on the lens and getting a D90.
     
  16. compuwar macrumors 601

    compuwar

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    #17
    IF is Internal Focus, where the lens doesn't extend in the front during focusing, IF lenses generally focus more quickly than non-IF lenses. Photographic lenses are made up of multiple glass elements, some of them may be "special" in terms of what they're made of (like Extra-low Dispersion glass, Nano-coatings, multicoatings, etc.) More elements make a more complex and more expensive lens, but the optical designers chose the number of elements and groups for specific reasons.
     
  17. avingochea thread starter macrumors member

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    #18
    OIC, Ok thanks. I ordered a 55-200mm lens, and it says both of those, So I guess its a decent lens? :)
     
  18. compuwar macrumors 601

    compuwar

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    #19
    Dunno, it's always worth learning to read MTF charts and checking reviews to see how a lens fairs before getting it, but if you're happy with the pictures, that's the biggest test of all.
     

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