Data Recovery for 2010 MBP

Discussion in 'MacBook Pro' started by laryenhilllvr, Feb 19, 2013.

  1. laryenhilllvr macrumors regular

    Joined:
    Dec 29, 2012
    Location:
    NYC
    #1
    My mid2010 mbp crashed and i'm getting the blue screen of death. I'm in need of the files on that computer and I was wondering if anyone knows of any reputable data recovery services or if apple can do it?

    Is it even possible to use that computer again? I ask because I turned around and bought the mid2012 nonretina mbp and that was faulty out of the box. I was getting a spinning wheel after every click, it took 10+ minutes just to get to the log in screen, and it would restart all the time. Apple told me that under the complimentary apple care i'm covered, but honestly if I can get that 2010 fixed and working, then I really don't want or need the 2012. Not to mention the 15" 2010 was BTO with higher specs than the lower spec stock 15". I'm wondering if they would give me at least close to the purchase price if I turned it in to get refurbished.
     
  2. Squilly macrumors 68020

    Squilly

    Joined:
    Nov 17, 2012
    Location:
    PA
    #2
    Did you have a time machine backup? That's all I can think of. As for the 2012 vs 2010, go with the 2012. You can still probably sell the 2010. The technology is getting more and more outdated in the 2010. Sell it if you get the chance, get some $, buy a 2012 model. Do you know how you started to get the BSOD?
     
  3. AlexMaximus macrumors 6502a

    AlexMaximus

    Joined:
    Aug 15, 2006
    Location:
    A400M Base
    #3
    There are some options...

    There are some options here I would try in your case:

    1. Get Information about the available Mac software. Reviews are on Youtube about "Data Rescue 3" and " Techtool Pro" or Disc Warrior.

    2. If you have a Best Buy store close by, ask the GeekSquad Service. They also offer a Data Rescue service that worked for me years ago.

    Thats what I would do First..
     
  4. kevink2 macrumors 65816

    Joined:
    Nov 2, 2008
    #4
    Some options are, if there is another MAC available, to use Target mode so you can access the hard drive as an external on the other Mac. I've done that when I've had disk corruption preventing booting.

    Or, take the drive out and put it in an enclosure.
     
  5. laryenhilllvr thread starter macrumors regular

    Joined:
    Dec 29, 2012
    Location:
    NYC
    #5
    no, i don't have a time machine backup since months ago (i'm out of the country and the only internet access I have is through an internet cafe type place). The thing is that I really don't need a laptop at this point, I have a desktop and an ipad, which i use infinitely more when i travel than i did my mbp. however, i am looking into getting an air when i start school again next year.

    i'll look into the software and see how it works. i'm not very tech savvy so hopefully it won't be too complicated. the geeksquad idea actually isn't bad, i'll give that a try if the software route is too confusing.

    dumb question, but how would I do that? i have the new imac and if i could just do that, it would be perfect for transferring files over (which is all i really want to do anyway).
     
  6. AlexMaximus macrumors 6502a

    AlexMaximus

    Joined:
    Aug 15, 2006
    Location:
    A400M Base
    #6
    Raiders of the lost data..

    Target disk mode works great when the mac works. Its partially designed to transfer data via the Migration Assistant. I am not sure it it works on defective macs but its worth a try.

    However I wanted to add one more thing to help:

    Three sources of failure are most common: 1. The logic board and the chips soldered on it. 2. The screen or display 3. The Hard Drive unit.
    With scenario 1 and 2, you would be lucky from a data rescue point of view. In this case you can rescue 100% of it.
    Now even in the case of a HD failure, there is 3a) Software or 3b) Hardware issue at hand. Either way you still might be able to rescue 30 - 100% of the data, given enough time and money to do it and depending on your value assessment of your data.

    What you can do with little cost:

    I would start out for a cheap 2,5' enclosure and transfer the HD in question to this external enclosure. This way its easy to check if the HD has suffered a hardware mechanical crash or if its accessible or not. This way you can eliminate option 1 and 2.
    If you HD is trashed you still have a good working computer, however you have the data rescue issue at hand, but the source of failure is identified. Then start with the software route or with external service help (GeekSquad).
    If you have serious HD head crash you would most likely hear it with a sound from the HD, either a repeating *clonck* or a grinding sound. If you have not recognised any unusual sound, chances are a boot record problem.

    My recommendation: Try the external enclosure rout first before you spend money on software or service. An enclosure can be used regardless and you have successfully circled in on the root issue.
     
  7. laryenhilllvr thread starter macrumors regular

    Joined:
    Dec 29, 2012
    Location:
    NYC
    #7
    I probably should have mentioned I hear the clicking noise, so does that eliminates the easier methods?
     
  8. AlexMaximus macrumors 6502a

    AlexMaximus

    Joined:
    Aug 15, 2006
    Location:
    A400M Base
    #8
    Clicking devil

    If its the clicking sound it means you have most likely a mechanical failure related to the reading head of the HD.
    On the budget side its actually good because you have a working MBP unit that you can sell very easy with a replaced hd and get at least 600 $ back in your pocket. On the data rescue side of it, you still have a medium chance to get some data back. Clicking means, the platter still is able to spin. (you should check if there is still a humming sound when the cpu tries to boot). Existing software can work around damaged data sectors on the platter. In the best case you only loose 10% of the data.
    Regardless the damage I would put the hd in an external enclosure. You need to replace the HD anyway even if its only for selling purpose of the MBP. GeekSquad would do the same in the process. OWC has a great cheap 2,5' enclosure for 18 bucks I believe where you can be sure it works with a mac interface. Now to the software route. If the data is very important, I would not buy a software, but ask apple and Geeksquad for advice and chance of rescue. If you are low on cash and confident on you tech skills, go with either an official licensed software solution or the underground rout. There is a great free mac software available, called Transmission. Check it out and read about it. Get familiar with it on google and look for your solution.
     
  9. laryenhilllvr thread starter macrumors regular

    Joined:
    Dec 29, 2012
    Location:
    NYC
    #9
    ...well it looks like i'll have to contact either apple or geeksquad. do you have a preference for either of them? i'm thinking apple may be more expensive, but i would like to think i'd have a higher rate of recovery as it is their equipment. am i incorrect in thinking this?
     
  10. AlexMaximus, Mar 15, 2013
    Last edited: Mar 15, 2013

    AlexMaximus macrumors 6502a

    AlexMaximus

    Joined:
    Aug 15, 2006
    Location:
    A400M Base
    #10
    I would ask both parties..

    The GeekSquad guys helped me out in 2008 and they rescued 90% of my Data. The Thing is, it was a HD out of a windows laptop. At that time they used a CD that was packed with all kinds of MSDos and Bios based software to check the HD down to its blocks and sectors. I got this cd and still have it somewhere in the basement with the copy of my secured data. I think I paid 100 bucks or so.
    Since BestBuy also sells Macs now, they should have the same cd for Macs. I would give them a shot, but ask the apple guys as well. Dont have experiance with apple recovery service.
    By the way, here is a third option to get an opinion from the Pros. Ask those guys too, they may can help too.

    http://www.cmedic.com/Ann Arbor Data Recovery.htm

    Make sure you read the Data recovery guide on the link as well. It can help too.

    They helped me in 2006 with Iomega Data problems. It would not hurt to ask.
    (I lived in Ann Arbor that time)

    Good luck and let me know if it worked out. Greetings from Thailand..
     

Share This Page