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DinosaursLayEggs

macrumors newbie
Original poster
Nov 1, 2019
4
0
Hello everyone.

First up, I apologise if this is in the wrong section. I was hoping someone could help me in figuring out if my battery would be covered by consumer law.

I purchased my MacBook Pro in June 2016 from my University’s shop. It is a 13 inch, Retina display, early 2015 model, and it was made to order.

Approximately a week ago, my MacBook battery completely died. I cannot use my MacBook without having it on charge which is quite annoying. When I checked my battery health about a month ago, there was no indication anything was wrong with it, the battery didn’t need a service, and it wasn’t being used up faster than previously. I checked my charge cycle count and found it to be much lower (450) than what Apple says the battery should last for (1000).

Given this information, if I went back to my University shop, would they replace/repair the battery free of charge under consumer law? I’m aware the onus is on me to prove that the issue was present when I purchased the Macbook, but I feel like this is not typical wear and tear given charge cycle count, and therefore must be a faulty battery. I don’t mind paying the Apple fee (£200) but if I can get it repaired/replaced for cheaper/free then why not try?

Thanks for any help!
 

Plutonius

macrumors G3
Feb 22, 2003
8,800
7,995
New Hampshire, USA
All countries laws differ so I doubt you will get anything other then it should cover it or it shouldn't cover it.

You probably need to talk to your University shop.
 

robbieduncan

Moderator emeritus
Jul 24, 2002
25,611
889
Harrogate
Free? Probably not. Your laptop is now over 3 years old and a battery can be considered wear and tear. They may offer some form of goodwill contribution/reduction in the cost
 

DinosaursLayEggs

macrumors newbie
Original poster
Nov 1, 2019
4
0
All countries laws differ so I doubt you will get anything other then it should cover it or it shouldn't cover it.

You probably need to talk to your University shop.
I forgot to mention in my post that I live in the UK and consumer law covers you for 6 years from purchase.
I just wanted to know if I’ve got a case to argue with that or just accept that I’ll have to pay
[automerge]1572628224[/automerge]
Free? Probably not. Your laptop is now over 3 years old and a battery can be considered wear and tear. They may offer some form of goodwill contribution/reduction in the cost
Thanks for the response. I was more wondering whether I’ve got a case to argue with consumer law or not (Consumer law applies for 6 years from date of purchase in the UK)
 

robbieduncan

Moderator emeritus
Jul 24, 2002
25,611
889
Harrogate
I forgot to mention in my post that I live in the UK and consumer law covers you for 6 years from purchase.
I just wanted to know if I’ve got a case to argue with that or just accept that I’ll have to pay

But it doesn’t mean you can expect replacement of consumable items for free for 6 years. Basically you have to prove there is a manufacturing fault in the battery.
 

DinosaursLayEggs

macrumors newbie
Original poster
Nov 1, 2019
4
0
But it doesn’t mean you can expect replacement of consumable items for free for 6 years. Basically you have to prove there is a manufacturing fault in the battery.
I understand that, that’s why I was asking. I don’t believe it’s wear and tear. For a battery to die with a charge cycle count of 450 when Apple say that they are designed to have a charge cycle count of approximately 1000 seems like more an issue with the battery than wear and tear. I’m happy to be proven wrong, but to me it just seems a bit low?
 

konqerror

macrumors 68020
Dec 31, 2013
2,298
3,693
For a battery to die with a charge cycle count of 450 when Apple say that they are designed to have a charge cycle count of approximately 1000 seems like more an issue with the battery than wear and tear.

Li-Ion batteries have a age-based life as well. In particular, if you leave them fully charged, they degrade faster. They will argue that your battery is past the design lifetime in age.

Cycle life is not the only determinant of battery life as it seems you're saying. It includes things like temperature, vibration, humidity, etc.
 

thisisnotmyname

macrumors 68020
Oct 22, 2014
2,427
5,179
known but velocity indeterminate
I understand that, that’s why I was asking. I don’t believe it’s wear and tear. For a battery to die with a charge cycle count of 450 when Apple say that they are designed to have a charge cycle count of approximately 1000 seems like more an issue with the battery than wear and tear. I’m happy to be proven wrong, but to me it just seems a bit low?

If your time it takes to file and pursue the legal action isn't worth 200 pounds go ahead and try. If you want legal advice you can consult an attorney (hopefully costing less than 200 pounds as well). Otherwise you roll the dice and maybe you'll reach a result that saves costs in replacement that exceed the opportunity cost in your time spent fighting for it.

edit to add: I suppose you could also try and locate an opportunistic law firm willing to invest in a series of daytime and late night TV adverts to attempt to locate enough other MBP owners who have had batteries die after 3.5 years but also feel entitled to free replacement and then form a class to sue Apple and receive 8 quid or a coupon for a free lightning to 3.5mm TRS adapter as a settlement.
 

DinosaursLayEggs

macrumors newbie
Original poster
Nov 1, 2019
4
0
Li-Ion batteries have a age-based life as well. In particular, if you leave them fully charged, they degrade faster. They will argue that your battery is past the design lifetime in age.

Cycle life is not the only determinant of battery life as it seems you're saying. It includes things like temperature, vibration, humidity, etc.
Ok thank you, I wasn’t aware of that. I knew I was clutching at straws but figured if I can argue it then I will. I generally don’t leave it on charge, but my boyfriend does so I suppose that contributed. I would have thought that when I checked battery health a month ago, it would have said to service the battery but I suppose not. It just seemed to have died a very sudden death
 

robbieduncan

Moderator emeritus
Jul 24, 2002
25,611
889
Harrogate
I understand that, that’s why I was asking. I don’t believe it’s wear and tear. For a battery to die with a charge cycle count of 450 when Apple say that they are designed to have a charge cycle count of approximately 1000 seems like more an issue with the battery than wear and tear. I’m happy to be proven wrong, but to me it just seems a bit low?
The problem I how can you prove the cycle count? A memory of the cycle count some time before failure is not really proof. However I’d say total failure I unusual so I’d at least talk to Apple about it
 
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