Dead hdd (probably) upgrading to ssd?

Discussion in 'MacBook Pro' started by taischr, Aug 6, 2015.

  1. taischr macrumors newbie

    Joined:
    Aug 6, 2015
    #1
    Hi there
    For a while I've thought about upgrading the hard drive that came along with my Macbook Pro 13" (2011 late) to an ssd, but never really came outside the thoughts.. But yesterday when I was playing around on it (running Yosemite), it suddenly froze, and after waiting for about 5 minutes with a non responding MBP, I decided to shut it down by holding down the power button - which resulted in a MBP unable to boot (it let me go through the login scene with the loading bar stuck somewhere halfway and then automatically turn off after 5-10 minutes. Then I ran through all the steps concerning this problem, but unfortunately nothing seemed to work out for me... I stupidly freaked out in Disk Utility while booted in Recovery Mode, and now my HDD won't mount, repair, format and can't be chosen to boot from (MBP now shows the blinking folder with question mark inside when trying to boot). It seems totally dead to me, though I ain't no expert on the subject.
    I'm very confused and have a bunch of questions needed to be answered and I would really appreciate some help, because I'm kinda helpless...

    1. How sure can I be that replacing my hdd with a new ssd would solve my problem?

    2 . Saying a replacement would solve it, would it be enough to just format the ssd to Mac OS Extended (Journaled) and make a bootable USB with Yosemite installation to install from? Or is there anything else I need to do?

    3. If you had to choose between a Samsung 850 Evo or the Crucial BX100 (both 500gb editions) which would you go with for a MBP like mine?

    Already put this in Buying Tips and Advice, but I guess it makes more sense here.. Dunno how to delete the first thread through :(
     
  2. maflynn Moderator

    maflynn

    Staff Member

    Joined:
    May 3, 2009
    Location:
    Boston
    #2
    Its probably dead, and you're right a SSD would resolve the issue but you posted this
    What exactly did you do? Its possible the drive is not dead but you did something so that it longer mounts, what I don't know.

    Either way, the SSD should help you, and if it doesn't just rebox it up and return it.

    As for your questions
    1. Yes it should resolve your issue
    2. Yes, what you listed is sufficient.
    3. Samsung
     
  3. keysofanxiety macrumors 604

    keysofanxiety

    Joined:
    Nov 23, 2011
    #3
    1. How sure can I be that replacing my hdd with a new ssd would solve my problem?

    It will, and it'll run better than new.

    2 . Saying a replacement would solve it, would it be enough to just format the ssd to Mac OS Extended (Journaled) and make a bootable USB with Yosemite installation to install from? Or is there anything else I need to do?


    That will be fine, or restore from Time Machine backup.

    3. If you had to choose between a Samsung 850 Evo or the Crucial BX100 (both 500gb editions) which would you go with for a MBP like mine?

    Literally either's fine. I've got a Samsung in mine though at work we tend to fit Crucial SSDs. No problems with either. I believe the 850 runs a little quicker.
     
  4. taischr thread starter macrumors newbie

    Joined:
    Aug 6, 2015
    #4
    Thanks for the response! Happy to hear the ssd option should solve it. Regarding what I exactly did in Disk Utility I'm not totally sure.. Just know that nothing seemed to work, then I tried to format it which took a worrying lot of time and therefore I stopped the process, though it said it might damage the hard drive - kinda stupid, but I was very frustrated and panicked.
     
  5. taischr thread starter macrumors newbie

    Joined:
    Aug 6, 2015
    #5
    Thanks for answering my questions! Seems like the ssd is what I'm going to go for - might choose the Samsung since the price difference is minimal.
     
  6. maflynn Moderator

    maflynn

    Staff Member

    Joined:
    May 3, 2009
    Location:
    Boston
    #6
    I don't think you can do anything in Disk Utility that could further damage the drive, I can understand (and empathize) the level of panic and frustration but the tool only allows you to partition, format, erase and repair a drive. I don't think you did anything wrong.
     
  7. taischr thread starter macrumors newbie

    Joined:
    Aug 6, 2015
    #7
    That's interesting. Is there any possibility of saving any content such as documents, music and movies on the hdd by connecting it externally? (Stupid me never saved the stuff elsewhere in case something like this would happen). And could the cause of my failing hdd have any correlation to the fact that I switched on FileVault somewhere about a day before it broke? It started acting a bit weird and laggy and stuff that I simply ignored kept popping up in Safari short time after I switched it on. Anyway, ordered the Samsung ssd a short time ago, hoping it will bring my beloved Macbook back to life. Thanks again for helping my out of hell.
     
  8. Fishrrman macrumors G3

    Joined:
    Feb 20, 2009
    #8
    OP wrote above:
    "Is there any possibility of saving any content such as documents, music and movies on the hdd by connecting it externally?"

    First off, you should understand that just because you can't BOOT from a drive, doesn't mean the drive has gone totally "bad" on you.
    The drive could still be working (that is, hardware is ok and not failed) but the software (OS) on it is corrupted.
    The fact that you CAN get into "recovery mode" indicates that the drive is working, but your system software is damaged on your "regular" (i.e., your main) partition.
    It might also involve some directory damage -- unknown at this moment.

    If you put your MacBook in my hands, here is what I would do:

    1. Get an SSD and an external enclosure. I think this one might work for you:
    http://www.amazon.com/dp/B003VKTJGW...UTF8&colid=R75PP4I2A0BE&coliid=I3DOKZ31SP7539

    2. Put the SSD into the enclosure (all you need is a screwdriver)

    3. Connect to the MacBook, get started up in recovery mode.

    4. Open Disk Utility. Does it now "see" the SSD/external? If so, initialize it HFS+ with journaling enabled.

    5. Next, install a clean copy of the OS onto the SSD/external. I'm thinking you'll have to download this from Apple, so it will take awhile to download/install.

    6. Now comes a critical moment. At the end of the installation process, the installer may offer you the option to migrate your data from another drive. Select this option and see if the installer can find your OLD internal HDD. Does it recognize its presence? If so, try to migrate your apps, accounts, data and settings over. It will take a little time.
    DOES THIS WORK?

    7. If it does, you should end up with an external drive that for all practical purposes "looks like" your internal HDD did before the OS got messed up.
    At this point, you can (temporarily) boot and run from the external as if it were your "main drive.

    8. Next, I'll assume that your MBP is the non-retina kind with a removable back and a replaceable SATA type drive, is this correct?
    If so, you can easily "swap the drives" and end up with the SSD in the MBP.
    Go to ifixit.com and take a look at the drive replacement guide there.

    This is a very easy procedure, all you need are two tools:
    - Philips #00 screwdriver
    - TORX T-6 driver
    You can find these tools at hardware stores, Lowe's, Home Depot, Sears, or online.
    DO NOT USE ANYTHING BUT THE CORRECT TOOLS!

    If you follow the ifixit guide, it's a 15 minute job. The hardest part is removing and replacing the screws on the back cover.

    9. Once all this is done, and you have the SSD inside the MacBook and working as it should, you might consider putting the old HDD into the external enclosure. Then initialize it with Disk Utility.
    Now, run DU's "repair disk" function on it.
    If DU gives you a "good report", repeat the test five times in succession.
    If you get the same good report each time, I'd use the drive as a backup drive.

    DO NOT use Time Machine.
    Instead, download either CarbonCopyCloner or SuperDuper and create a BOOTABLE cloned backup drive.
    This way, you will always have a second, BOOTABLE drive on-hand in case you get into another "I can't boot!" moment -- as you did here.
     
  9. taischr thread starter macrumors newbie

    Joined:
    Aug 6, 2015
    #9
    Thanks a lot! I'll try following your detailed procedure. But it seems like I'm only able to launch Internet Recovery mode at this point and not the regular Recovery Mode. Losing my stuff wouldn't break my heart, but it surely would be sad.
     

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