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B&H Photo is offering a few solid deals on Apple's 24-inch iMac, starting with the 7-core GPU/256GB model for $1,199.00, down from $1,299.00. This price is only available in the Pink color, and Silver is at a second-best price of $1,229.00 on B&H Photo and Amazon.

iMac-Deals-Red.jpg
Note: MacRumors is an affiliate partner with some of these vendors. When you click a link and make a purchase, we may receive a small payment, which helps us keep the site running.

At $100 off, this sale is a match of the previous all-time low price on the 24-inch iMac. We've only seen this sale one or two times so far in 2022, so if you're in the market for the M1 iMac, now is a good time to buy.



In another sale, B&H Photo is discounting the 8-core GPU/256GB 24-inch iMac to $1,349.00, down from $1,499.00. You can get the iMac in Orange and Silver at this price point, and B&H does point out that there is limited supply.



You can keep track of ongoing sales on Apple's iMac line by visiting our Best iMac Deals guide. There, we keep track of the best iMac offers from Amazon, Adorama, B&H Photo, and other retailers, so be sure to check back often if you're shopping for an iMac for the first time, or thinking of upgrading.

Article Link: Deals: Apple's 24-Inch iMac Hits Record Low Prices at Up to $150 Off
 
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foliovision

Contributor
Jun 11, 2008
125
55
Bratislava
Just be sure not to buy an 8GB M1 Mac. While they work for web browsing (limited tabs) and text edit, as soon as your spin up a serious multimedia app (photo or video), the game is up. 8GB as shared memory for CPU and GPU is a dead end, like the old 2GB and 4GB i5 machines.

16GB is okay for a single multimedia application open at a time with some small helper applications and a web browser. Or of course and office machine. The M1 unified memory architecture with starts to really breathe at 32GB.
 

steve217

macrumors 6502
Nov 11, 2011
439
567
NC
Just be sure not to buy an 8GB M1 Mac. While they work for web browsing (limited tabs) and text edit, as soon as your spin up a serious multimedia app (photo or video), the game is up. 8GB as shared memory for CPU and GPU is a dead end, like the old 2GB and 4GB i5 machines.
Do you own or regularly use an 8GB M1 Mac?

I have two and they function fine and beyond the limits you describe.
 

AxiomaticRubric

macrumors 6502a
Sep 24, 2010
888
1,039
On Mars, Praising the Omnissiah
Just be sure not to buy an 8GB M1 Mac. While they work for web browsing (limited tabs) and text edit, as soon as your spin up a serious multimedia app (photo or video), the game is up. 8GB as shared memory for CPU and GPU is a dead end, like the old 2GB and 4GB i5 machines.

16GB is okay for a single multimedia application open at a time with some small helper applications and a web browser. Or of course and office machine. The M1 unified memory architecture with starts to really breathe at 32GB.

That has not been my experience on an M1 MacBook Pro with 8 GB unified memory. I’m a software developer and I have yet to see any serious performance issues. I often have apps running in NodeJS and .NET in the background at the same time without any issues.

I always keep at least 60% of the flash storage free for the inevitable virtual memory needs, and to extend the usable life of the machine.
 

Spock

macrumors 68030
Jan 6, 2002
2,885
5,142
Vulcan
Just be sure not to buy an 8GB M1 Mac. While they work for web browsing (limited tabs) and text edit, as soon as your spin up a serious multimedia app (photo or video), the game is up. 8GB as shared memory for CPU and GPU is a dead end, like the old 2GB and 4GB i5 machines.

16GB is okay for a single multimedia application open at a time with some small helper applications and a web browser. Or of course and office machine. The M1 unified memory architecture with starts to really breathe at 32GB.
My 8GB M1 MacBook Air runs just fine..
 

jmonster

macrumors newbie
Mar 21, 2022
21
34
Just be sure not to buy an 8GB M1 Mac. While they work for web browsing (limited tabs) and text edit, as soon as your spin up a serious multimedia app (photo or video), the game is up. 8GB as shared memory for CPU and GPU is a dead end, like the old 2GB and 4GB i5 machines.

16GB is okay for a single multimedia application open at a time with some small helper applications and a web browser. Or of course and office machine. The M1 unified memory architecture with starts to really breathe at 32GB.
This comment is without merit.

Professional software developer here. The only scenario where I've seen any slow-down whatsoever is when I attempt to run Docker which, on a mac, requires spinning up a VM and just gobbles up RAM. EVERYTHING ELSE including my multimedia hobbies run fantastic.

I own both an 8GB M1 iMac and a 16GB M1 Pro and observe almost no difference whatsoever in terms of the user experience. Only when I'm rendering out long running tasks does the M1 Pro exhibit a meaningful difference.

YMMV with heavy multimedia workloads that require Real Time performance, but those people aren't making decisions based on comments in a message board.
 

jkmoses

macrumors member
Jan 14, 2013
38
68
Mapleton, Utah
Just be sure not to buy an 8GB M1 Mac. While they work for web browsing (limited tabs) and text edit, as soon as your spin up a serious multimedia app (photo or video), the game is up. 8GB as shared memory for CPU and GPU is a dead end, like the old 2GB and 4GB i5 machines.

16GB is okay for a single multimedia application open at a time with some small helper applications and a web browser. Or of course and office machine. The M1 unified memory architecture with starts to really breathe at 32GB.
You must be "using it wrong". I have the base M1 mini and use PhotoShop and Illustrator on a regular basis and it runs circles around my 2019 Intel MacBook Pro that I have for work. I'm not sure I've even heard the fan come on yet.
 

progx

macrumors 6502
Oct 3, 2003
468
440
Pennsylvania
Just be sure not to buy an 8GB M1 Mac. While they work for web browsing (limited tabs) and text edit, as soon as your spin up a serious multimedia app (photo or video), the game is up. 8GB as shared memory for CPU and GPU is a dead end, like the old 2GB and 4GB i5 machines.

Pretty sure these new iMacs spank my Mac mini late 2018, even with an i7 processor, 32GB of RAM and an eGPU plugged into the Thunderbolt 3 port. For light editing, these machines are pretty damn good for the consumer and entry level prosumer.

For people who do more than that, there’s the newly announced Mac Studio and MacBook Pros.
 

Moonlight

macrumors 65816
Jul 9, 2002
1,005
1,911
Los Angeles
Just be sure not to buy an 8GB M1 Mac. While they work for web browsing (limited tabs) and text edit, as soon as your spin up a serious multimedia app (photo or video), the game is up. 8GB as shared memory for CPU and GPU is a dead end, like the old 2GB and 4GB i5 machines.

16GB is okay for a single multimedia application open at a time with some small helper applications and a web browser. Or of course and office machine. The M1 unified memory architecture with starts to really breathe at 32GB.
As others have said, this is just not true.
 

Mr. Dee

macrumors 68040
Dec 4, 2003
3,906
6,543
Jamaica
Just be sure not to buy an 8GB M1 Mac. While they work for web browsing (limited tabs) and text edit, as soon as your spin up a serious multimedia app (photo or video), the game is up. 8GB as shared memory for CPU and GPU is a dead end, like the old 2GB and 4GB i5 machines.

16GB is okay for a single multimedia application open at a time with some small helper applications and a web browser. Or of course and office machine. The M1 unified memory architecture with starts to really breathe at 32GB.
You obviously don’t own one of these machine.
 

Ziperix

macrumors member
Dec 16, 2021
61
95
Just be sure not to buy an 8GB M1 Mac. While they work for web browsing (limited tabs) and text edit, as soon as your spin up a serious multimedia app (photo or video), the game is up. 8GB as shared memory for CPU and GPU is a dead end, like the old 2GB and 4GB i5 machines.

16GB is okay for a single multimedia application open at a time with some small helper applications and a web browser. Or of course and office machine. The M1 unified memory architecture with starts to really breathe at 32GB.
This is just false
 
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foliovision

Contributor
Jun 11, 2008
125
55
Bratislava
You must be "using it wrong". I have the base M1 mini and use PhotoShop and Illustrator on a regular basis and it runs circles around my 2019 Intel MacBook Pro that I have for work. I'm not sure I've even heard the fan come on yet.
Okay boys, enough empty accusations and ad-hominem rubbish. I had a Mac Mini 8GB in for six weeks and tried to live with the 8GB of RAM. Completely silent, very fast after boot or without too many applications open. Very nice taster for someone who had not been interested in M1 up until that point. It's hard to work in silence and go back to fans and background noise.

Once fully up and running it became a total nightmare of endless paging.

When rendering RAW photos in my preferred photo app, the M1 Mac Mini would become unusable (inadequate graphics power) and basically freeze for half an hour. v5 of PhotoLab did improve export (leans on neural cores instead of graphics power) but those freezes gives a clear idea of the limitations of the M1. The issue today is RAM though.

Brought in a 14 inch M1 Pro with 16GB of RAM. Situation much better. Would work fine most of the time. Woe betide anyone opening up DaVinci Resolve and PhotoLab 5 at the same time though, with browsers open. DaVinci Resolve will gobble up 17 GB RAM by itself and PhotoLab will go up over 12 GB. In the case of PhotoLab it's bad behaviour under Rosetta on Apple Silicon and shouldn't happen. But we live in the real world. There will be another two or three years of coding issues where apps take more resources than they should. Then the next problem, modern developers is that most of you will happily just use up as much memory as you can get your hands on instead of managing memory carefully. Heck most software publishers are pushing everything out as RAM gobbling Electron apps (Spotify, Signal, RocketChat, Slack, Joplin, Obisidian, SimpleNote, StandardNotes just to name a few) even before the developers join the party.

Even 16GB left me often waiting on paging and with a curiously unresponsive computer. I did not face these issues with 16GB of RAM on a 2011 MBP 17", as Intel apps for the moment appear to use RAM more efficiently. Sometimes no doubt related to the separate VRAM in most Intel computers (8GB VRAM has been standard in iMacs and MBP for a few years now). Note, I'm not saying the OS uses RAM more efficiently but legacy apps running native under Intel do better than either most new Apple Silicon ports or legacy apps running under Rosetta.

If 16GB isn't enough, clearly 8 GB will not get you far for long.

In the end, with a 32GB M1 Max (16" this time, as if going Max, for thermal reasons one should go 16" and the larger screen and better speakers are worth the extra weight to me when working on the road), I found that my M1 MBP no longer struggles with memory no matter how many SSB or tabs or multimedia apps I throw at it (I normally only have two big ones open, video and photo or video and audio).

Many people should be able to happily live with 16GB. Those who bought 8GB have bought a self-destructing time bomb. If that iMac 24" is your kitchen computer for browsing news and recipes and queuing up your Apple TV, sure, why not...

On the other hand, if you are planning to use the new M1 Mac as a main computer long term, do yourself a favour and upgrade the memory to 16GB. Pay Apple now or buy a new computer (very soon) later.
 
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foliovision

Contributor
Jun 11, 2008
125
55
Bratislava
That has not been my experience on an M1 MacBook Pro with 8 GB unified memory. I’m a software developer and I have yet to see any serious performance issues. I often have apps running in NodeJS and .NET in the background at the same time without any issues.
A software developer might be able to get by. Some of the software development suites are pretty lightweight and well-coded (not all).
 

foliovision

Contributor
Jun 11, 2008
125
55
Bratislava
inarticulate animated gif
And there you go cluttering up everybody's screen with an animated GIF. Have an argument against what I've written, make it. It used to be if you cheaped out and bought a MacBook Pro or even any other Mac, you could upgrade the memory later when it became apparent that 2GB, 4GB, 8GB was just not enough.

There's no second kick at the can with integrated memory. Buying an 8GB M1 means an obsolete computer in two years. Of course, some people think nothing of digital waste (including Apple) so see no issue with just junking computers after a couple of years. Apple's memory prices (almost forcing people to underprovision their computers, more profit for them later) don't help.
 
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AxiomaticRubric

macrumors 6502a
Sep 24, 2010
888
1,039
On Mars, Praising the Omnissiah
Buying an 8GB M1 means an obsolete computer in two years. Of course, some people think nothing of digital waste (including Apple) so see no issue with just junking computers after a couple of years. Apple's memory prices (almost forcing people to underprovision their computers, more profit for them later) don't help.

This is a completely different situation.

Apple has hit the reset button on what a Mac can do out of the box: dramatically less heat, incredible battery life, instant wake from sleep, etc. I think you will be pleasantly surprised how long an M1 Mac with 8 GB of integrated memory will stay relevant and supported.

In terms of longevity we need to forget the Intel Macs. A better comparison is the iPad, which stays relevant and supported with far less memory than a Mac with Apple Silicon.

I’m not being a fanboy here. This is based purely on experience using an M1 Mac with 8 GB of integrated memory. After over a year of constant use it’s still lightning fast and I have had no issues with it.
 

foliovision

Contributor
Jun 11, 2008
125
55
Bratislava
This is a completely different situation.
No it's not. These Apple "deals" are on under-provisioned computers which will not provide their users with a good long term experience and which will require prompt replacing (and create a lot of electrowaste). The M1 Pro 14 inch laptops in base configuration are a far more viable long term solution (16GB of RAM, 14GPU). Or the new Studio Max at $2000 with 32GB of RAM is an even better long term solution.

The best computer I've used recently for most macOS software is the 2020 iMac 5K with the 8 core processor and 8GB W5500 graphic card. Can be bought for less than €2000 refurbished from Apple and the memory can be bumped to 64GB for €200.

Add TurboBoost Switcher to get rid of almost all fan noise and it spanks any of the low end M1 Macs and includes the 5K Mac Studio Display at no extra cost.

These 8GB base model M1 Macs are not a good deal and are near future electrowaste. If you care at all about the environment, and are not just a selfish person living for today with no long term vision, then I cannot recommend strongly enough against them.
 
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