Deals Spotlight: 16-Inch MacBook Pro Gets $100 Discount at Best Buy, Amazon, and Adorama (Starting at $2,300)

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Apr 12, 2001
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A trio of retailers have begun discounting Apple's just-released 16-inch MacBook Pro, including Best Buy, Amazon, and Adorama. These sales follow discounts offered by Expercom, which are deeper and extend to custom configuration models as well.

Note: MacRumors is an affiliate partner with these vendors. When you click a link and make a purchase, we may receive a small payment, which helps us keep the site running.

If you're only interested in the two base models of the 16-inch MacBook Pro and would prefer ordering from Best Buy, Amazon, or Adorama, we've compiled every discount below. Shoppers should note that in many instances these notebooks will ship later than Apple's estimated dates, by as much as three weeks, particularly for those ordered from Amazon.

For Best Buy's sales, you'll also need to be a part of the My Best Buy program to notice the discounts on each MacBook Pro. Take a look at each price markdown in the list below and be sure to shop before the sales expire.

16-Inch MacBook Pro Sale ($100 off)

16GB RAM, 512GB SSD, Silver - $2,299.00, down from $2,399.00 [Adorama, Amazon, Best Buy]
16GB RAM, 512GB SSD, Space Gray - $2,299.00, down from $2,399.00 [Adorama, Amazon, Best Buy]
16GB RAM, 1TB SSD, Silver - $2,699.00, down from $2,799.00 [Adorama, Amazon, Best Buy]
16GB RAM, 1TB SSD, Space Gray - $2,699.00, down from $2,799.00 [Adorama, Amazon, Best Buy] Head to our full Deals Roundup for more Apple-related bargains, and then visit our Black Friday Roundup to prepare for the upcoming shopping event, which is now just two weeks away.

Article Link: Deals Spotlight: 16-Inch MacBook Pro Gets $100 Discount at Best Buy, Amazon, and Adorama (Starting at $2,300)
 

keysofanxiety

macrumors G3
Nov 23, 2011
9,539
24,713
Nice but with no Wi-Fi 6 I’m gonna pass. Let’s see if the next (hopefully) 14 inch has better connectivity options.
Genuine question. I’ve seen this mentioned a lot here and I don’t know if this is a criticism people are trying to bandwagon or if there’s a very good reason.

802.11ac has stronger than gigabit throughput. Almost all routers on the market don’t support 802.11ax. For the purpose of connecting to the Internet, you'd be hard pressed to find a router which even supports faster than gigabit in, and just as difficult to find a symmetrical gigabit Internet connection.

If you need a faster or more stable connection for a local network, you’d likely be wired anyway with 10Gb Ethernet.

I understand it’s good to have the latest technology but is this really a necessary feature stopping you buying it? Can you confirm why you need 802.11ax? Again, I’m asking because I don’t know why people seem so passionate about this.
 

forbegos34

macrumors member
Jun 12, 2016
79
54
It's been the same price since 2016. Counting for inflation, the 15" MacBook Pro from 2006 was $2,551.76.
Yes, I was thinking the same thing, price is actually right this time.
- - Post merged: - -

Costco has same pricing, 90 day return, second year warranty.
That second year warranty is huge, no need for AppleCare?
 

sonarun

macrumors newbie
Aug 23, 2012
4
7
The reality is that most people don’t actually know what they want or need. Just because it is the latest technology and that their phone has it. They also need something to complain about

If you actually take the laptop anywhere, an airport, hotel, etc. There is no way you are going to see wifi6 being used or get the benefits of it. There are no travel routers that support wifi6 either.

I for one, am big on having the latest and greatest. I would have rather had a 1080p camera or faceid in the laptop than wifi6. Either way, this is the first Apple laptop I am buying since 2012.

Genuine question. I’ve seen this mentioned a lot here and I don’t know if this is a criticism people are trying to bandwagon or if there’s a very good reason.

802.11ac has stronger than gigabit throughput. Almost all routers on the market don’t support 802.11ax. For the purpose of connecting to the Internet, you'd be hard pressed to find a router which even supports faster than gigabit in, and just as difficult to find a symmetrical gigabit Internet connection.

If you need a faster or more stable connection for a local network, you’d likely be wired anyway with 10Gb Ethernet.

I understand it’s good to have the latest technology but is this really a necessary feature stopping you buying it? Can you confirm why you need 802.11ax? Again, I’m asking because I don’t know why people seem so passionate about this.
 

Jetfire

macrumors 6502
Jul 10, 2008
370
321
Cincinnati, Ohio, USA
The reality is that most people don’t actually know what they want or need. Just because it is the latest technology and that their phone has it. They also need something to complain about

If you actually take the laptop anywhere, an airport, hotel, etc. There is no way you are going to see wifi6 being used or get the benefits of it. There are no travel routers that support wifi6 either.

I for one, am big on having the latest and greatest. I would have rather had a 1080p camera or faceid in the laptop than wifi6. Either way, this is the first Apple laptop I am buying since 2012.
True, but some people are thinking about the future. How wide will be wifi6 be 5 years from now. This is the first MacBook Pro that I would buy since my early 2011 one, that I still have. I bought a iMac Pro in Jan 2018. The one thing I hate about it is it has no USB3 ports. I would have had to wait a year to get USB3 but couldn't and need a new machine then. It's the same with the reason I got the iMac Pro (on sale $1,000 off). The Mid 2018 would have been the replacement for my 2011 if I didn't buy the iMac Pro. If the machine doesn't have what you want and you can wait then wait.
 

forbegos34

macrumors member
Jun 12, 2016
79
54
My thinking is the configuration should be with 32GB and the higher end graphics options if you are planning on a 3-4 years window for this purchase. +400 USD for the memory upgrade. I miss the old days when memory could be added by the end user.
 

falkon-engine

macrumors member
Apr 30, 2010
54
222
Genuine question. I’ve seen this mentioned a lot here and I don’t know if this is a criticism people are trying to bandwagon or if there’s a very good reason.

802.11ac has stronger than gigabit throughput. Almost all routers on the market don’t support 802.11ax. For the purpose of connecting to the Internet, you'd be hard pressed to find a router which even supports faster than gigabit in, and just as difficult to find a symmetrical gigabit Internet connection.

If you need a faster or more stable connection for a local network, you’d likely be wired anyway with 10Gb Ethernet.

I understand it’s good to have the latest technology but is this really a necessary feature stopping you buying it? Can you confirm why you need 802.11ax? Again, I’m asking because I don’t know why people seem so passionate about this.
Main reason is future proofing. Then there's the fact that the iPhone 11 has 802.11ax... but not the more expensive macbook? I transfer files on my LAN, the faster the better for me.

While 802.11ac has theoretical speeds of over 1 gbps, in practice its throughput is less than a gigabit per second; around 900 mbps seems to be the ceiling on the very best of routers, and much less on the more mainstream ones. However, early testing shows that the new Wifi6 cards (which are on amazon today) from intel have 1.3 gbps and better performance, and it's only going to get better. These early cards only have 2 antennas, but as more antennas are added to future models, performance will skyrocket.

If the 16 inch macbook had a 10 gbe LAN port then its lack of wifi 6 would be forgivable. But it doesn't come with any LAN ports...just thunderbolt 3. And a thunderbolt 3 10 gbe adapter is expensive... and may not even work with macOS since it's not clear what, if any 802.11ax chipsets macOS currently supports. So, since Apple will very likely adopt wifi 6 in 2020 (Intel's 10th generation processors have native support for wifi 6), to me, it makes sense to wait to spend $2.3+K.
 

wigby

macrumors 68000
Jun 7, 2007
1,816
1,265
Genuine question. I’ve seen this mentioned a lot here and I don’t know if this is a criticism people are trying to bandwagon or if there’s a very good reason.

802.11ac has stronger than gigabit throughput. Almost all routers on the market don’t support 802.11ax. For the purpose of connecting to the Internet, you'd be hard pressed to find a router which even supports faster than gigabit in, and just as difficult to find a symmetrical gigabit Internet connection.

If you need a faster or more stable connection for a local network, you’d likely be wired anyway with 10Gb Ethernet.

I understand it’s good to have the latest technology but is this really a necessary feature stopping you buying it? Can you confirm why you need 802.11ax? Again, I’m asking because I don’t know why people seem so passionate about this.
I think it’s similar to people waiting on the 5G iPhone. Do they need the speed now? No. Will they need the speed in a few years? Maybe. Are they just procrastinating because they really don’t need new hardware but are more afraid of looking like chumps next year for purchasing “obsolete” hardware too soon? Exactamundo.
 

boshaus

macrumors newbie
Jul 6, 2012
2
0
I understand it’s good to have the latest technology but is this really a necessary feature stopping you buying it? Can you confirm why you need 802.11ax? Again, I’m asking because I don’t know why people seem so passionate about this.
It’s not enough to keep me from buying one, but I do really like the feature that wifi6 encrypts open networks (provided the ap supports it too). I tend to keep my MacBooks a long time as I’m sitting on a 2012 retina now. So while it’s useless now I can see airports etc upgrading over the years.
 

QCassidy352

macrumors G4
Mar 20, 2003
10,618
2,740
Bay Area
It’s not enough to keep me from buying one, but I do really like the feature that wifi6 encrypts open networks (provided the ap supports it too). I tend to keep my MacBooks a long time as I’m sitting on a 2012 retina now. So while it’s useless now I can see airports etc upgrading over the years.
I agree. This “issue” is certainly not much of an “issue today,” but my current MacBook Pro just passed 6 years old, so I would want to buy more than I need right now with an eye towards keeping the next one as long.
 

GoodWheaties

macrumors 6502a
Jul 8, 2015
682
658
Genuine question. I’ve seen this mentioned a lot here and I don’t know if this is a criticism people are trying to bandwagon or if there’s a very good reason.

802.11ac has stronger than gigabit throughput. Almost all routers on the market don’t support 802.11ax. For the purpose of connecting to the Internet, you'd be hard pressed to find a router which even supports faster than gigabit in, and just as difficult to find a symmetrical gigabit Internet connection.

If you need a faster or more stable connection for a local network, you’d likely be wired anyway with 10Gb Ethernet.

I understand it’s good to have the latest technology but is this really a necessary feature stopping you buying it? Can you confirm why you need 802.11ax? Again, I’m asking because I don’t know why people seem so passionate about this.
First, while 802.11ac has a theoretical higher throughout than gigabit LAN, it’s simply not the case. LAN is full duplex while WiFi is half-duplex so that cuts your potential speed right there.
Second, with 802.11ac and older, only one device can be talking to the router at a time. So with multiple devices connected it’s quickly sending packets to different devices one at a time.
Third, it also depends on how many channels your device has. I think all MacBooks are 3x3 so it can send on a maximum of three channels. With 802.11ac on 2.4Ghz, that means 3x150Mbps (450Mbps) maximum. On 5 GHz, that means 3x433Mbps (1300Mbps) maximum. So after the half duplex and other overhead it will max out at 3-400Mbps. I’m pretty sure people who are saying they get more than that are simply looking at connection speed not actual throughput.

All that to say this, WiFi 6 changes a lot of things in this. Maximum throughput is about 40% higher on the same frequencies, multiple devices can talk to the router at once, lower latency, some power tricks in telling the device when it can shut down its antenna, and other stuff. So I understand why people want it but personally i think it will be years before it really makes a difference. Maybe if you live in a congested neighborhood where WiFi signals are everywhere, but you had better be prepared to change all your devices to WiFi 6.
 

Zen_Arcade

macrumors regular
Jun 3, 2019
125
109
It was good to see that Apple maintained its 10% off for military and veterans. So the new 16"/2.3/1TB was $2519 direct from Apple.
 

LuciusWrong

macrumors regular
Jun 24, 2019
168
115
It's been the same price since 2016. Counting for inflation, the 15" MacBook Pro from 2006 was $2,551.76.
You stole my line, except these machines are actually cheaper now!

In 2013, I bought the (late) 2013 MBPr for $2599 + tax. That was 2.3ghz (4 core) + 16gb + 512gb. And dual graphics. (I'm currently typing on that same machine, btw...)

Controlling for inflation, that is $2904.47 + tax in today's money!


And what you get is the new 2.3ghz (8 core) will be more than 2x the speed. (The latest 15.4" w/2.3ghz was already 2x faster, and the early reviews suggest the 16" will be another 5-10% faster due to better cooling.)

So yeah, I'm about ready to upgrade. But I need to put my grubby fingers on that new keyboard first, and I'll wait for the holiday sales to take effect. I'm betting there will be sales between now and Christmas.
 

LuciusWrong

macrumors regular
Jun 24, 2019
168
115
True, but some people are thinking about the future. How wide will be wifi6 be 5 years from now. This is the first MacBook Pro that I would buy since my early 2011 one, that I still have. I bought a iMac Pro in Jan 2018. The one thing I hate about it is it has no USB3 ports. I would have had to wait a year to get USB3 but couldn't and need a new machine then. It's the same with the reason I got the iMac Pro (on sale $1,000 off). The Mid 2018 would have been the replacement for my 2011 if I didn't buy the iMac Pro. If the machine doesn't have what you want and you can wait then wait.

I remember being excited about AC wifi. I bought the first router that was capable when I built a custom PC...the Asus. That was ~10 years ago! Back then, they were still selling cheap "g" routers alongside the "n" routers...

My point is adoption of new standards is way slower than we hope/want.

And Wifi being a 2.4ghz competes in a congested frequency band, not just against other wifi, but also bluetooth and other "wireless" stuff...which slows it down. So thinking that having the newest tech will automatically lead to more speed is not always true.
 

4sallypat

macrumors 6502
Sep 16, 2016
296
250
So Calif
First, while 802.11ac has a theoretical higher throughout than gigabit LAN, it’s simply not the case. LAN is full duplex while WiFi is half-duplex so that cuts your potential speed right there.
Second, with 802.11ac and older, only one device can be talking to the router at a time. So with multiple devices connected it’s quickly sending packets to different devices one at a time.
Third, it also depends on how many channels your device has. I think all MacBooks are 3x3 so it can send on a maximum of three channels. With 802.11ac on 2.4Ghz, that means 3x150Mbps (450Mbps) maximum. On 5 GHz, that means 3x433Mbps (1300Mbps) maximum. So after the half duplex and other overhead it will max out at 3-400Mbps. I’m pretty sure people who are saying they get more than that are simply looking at connection speed not actual throughput.

All that to say this, WiFi 6 changes a lot of things in this. Maximum throughput is about 40% higher on the same frequencies, multiple devices can talk to the router at once, lower latency, some power tricks in telling the device when it can shut down its antenna, and other stuff. So I understand why people want it but personally i think it will be years before it really makes a difference. Maybe if you live in a congested neighborhood where WiFi signals are everywhere, but you had better be prepared to change all your devices to WiFi 6.
I hardly use WiFi so it's a non issue.
My current 15" MBP uses Thunderbolt - Ethernet on a 10GBps network.
At home, my 12" Retina Macbook uses a USB-C to Ethernet on a 500Mbps network.

Can't stand WiFi unless it's my iPad or iPhone.

The new 16" MBP without the WiFi6 in a non issue - it would probably suck the battery dry quicker...
 

MauiPa

macrumors 6502a
Apr 18, 2018
596
804
Nice but with no Wi-Fi 6 I’m gonna pass. Let’s see if the next (hopefully) 14 inch has better connectivity options.
Interesting point. seeing that the intel chips only support ac. If apple had "upgraded" to 10th generation chips, they would be limited to 4 cores, instead of 6 or 8.
- - Post merged: - -

First, while 802.11ac has a theoretical higher throughout than gigabit LAN, it’s simply not the case. LAN is full duplex while WiFi is half-duplex so that cuts your potential speed right there.
Second, with 802.11ac and older, only one device can be talking to the router at a time. So with multiple devices connected it’s quickly sending packets to different devices one at a time.
Third, it also depends on how many channels your device has. I think all MacBooks are 3x3 so it can send on a maximum of three channels. With 802.11ac on 2.4Ghz, that means 3x150Mbps (450Mbps) maximum. On 5 GHz, that means 3x433Mbps (1300Mbps) maximum. So after the half duplex and other overhead it will max out at 3-400Mbps. I’m pretty sure people who are saying they get more than that are simply looking at connection speed not actual throughput.

All that to say this, WiFi 6 changes a lot of things in this. Maximum throughput is about 40% higher on the same frequencies, multiple devices can talk to the router at once, lower latency, some power tricks in telling the device when it can shut down its antenna, and other stuff. So I understand why people want it but personally i think it will be years before it really makes a difference. Maybe if you live in a congested neighborhood where WiFi signals are everywhere, but you had better be prepared to change all your devices to WiFi 6.
yep, but when using intel chips, you are on 9th generation and ac, or 10th generation limited to 4 cores. Of course you could argue for a major redesign, but with intel hopefully going to release a full complement of 10th or 11th generation chips that support wifi6, that doesn't seem likely.