Decent enough for hobbyist editing?

Discussion in 'Digital Photography' started by lJoSquaredl, Nov 27, 2014.

  1. lJoSquaredl macrumors regular

    Joined:
    Mar 26, 2012
    #1
    I have a rMBP, but i'd like to get a new external monitor soon. I'll be doing light gaming, video editing, photo editing, nothing professional just casual stuff except small projects for people. The rMBP is fun to edit on but i've heard the colors won't be very accurate. Found this nice thin Samsung monitor with what looks like decent calibration and pretty good color gamut according to this review. Would I be fine editing on this or double checking coloring when editing? I know 1080p is lacking for editing photos but kinda wanna stick with it a bit longer until 4k becomes more of a norm, and I don't wanna mess with anything in-between, just gonna make the big jump soon.

    https://pcmonitors.info/reviews/samsung-s24d390hl/
     
  2. Attonine macrumors 6502a

    Joined:
    Feb 15, 2006
    Location:
    Kent. UK
    #2
    I don't know that the rMBP doesn't have accurate colours. Have you used a dedicated colour calibration system such a Spider or X-rite, or even the calibration tool in OS X preferences under display>colour? I always understood you should calibrate any monitor you are using, especially if you require any colour accuracy, and definitely if you are going to print (the display needs to be calibrated so its colours are the same as the printer's), never rely on the factory calibration. I think the same goes for most (all?) monitors whether it's the Samsung you are looking at or a high end Eizo. Yes, there certainly are differences between displays, I'm sure those with more knowledge in this area will come along to help.
     
  3. phrehdd macrumors 68040

    phrehdd

    Joined:
    Oct 25, 2008
    #3
    I'll be as brief as I can here with some generalizations -

    You should check the specs on the monitor to see what it is capable of with respect to graphics. This often means evaluating for the various colour spaces and what percent of each does that particular monitor cover.

    There are two methods of optimizing screen output - hardware calibration and software calibration (profiling). The latter is far more common among monitors while hardware calibrating remains with true graphics monitors where the actual monitor itself is adjusted. Typical of hardware calibration are higher end offerings from NEC and Eizo. Samsung, HP, Dell etc. all remain in the camp that uses profiling for the most part.

    While I may work with an NEC (and do), I have been pleasantly surprised to see some offerings from various makers that depend on profiling that do quite well and certainly at less cost. The winning combination is getting a monitor that has good specs and a proper profile calibrator.

    Last - calibration is not done just once. Depending on your hardware, depending on how often you use the monitor etc., recalibrating should be part of the process. I recalibrate my monitor approx every 4 weeks. The implication for most is that the calibration tool should be a good quality selection as it is an important measuring and correction tool.
     
  4. lJoSquaredl thread starter macrumors regular

    Joined:
    Mar 26, 2012
    #4
    Well i've heard rMBP only reproduces about 67%. Most people say unless you're doing pro level work this is enough, especially if not printing. I only do mild editing for myself and locals at best right now, so I was just looking for a monitor that, on top of my other stuff, would add a little headroom in that area for double checking when better work did come up. This looks like a pretty cheap monitor while still giving me that headroom. The site I linked even has settings included during their calibration for a loose idea of where you may need to keep it...altho i'm sure not perfect. Trying to keep it somewhat cheap with the holidays too, lotta other stuff to buy:)

    The one thing that worries me is IPS glow tho. Never had to deal with it, heard it can be excessive and almost worse than TN panel issues at time. Honestly tho considering how bad my Asus is from even 5 degrees left or right of dead center, it can't be that bad.
     
  5. Attonine macrumors 6502a

    Joined:
    Feb 15, 2006
    Location:
    Kent. UK
    #5
    I don't know what 67% means so you'll need someone who knows all about this stuff to help. I'm sure someone on the forum will be along to help.
     

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