Defragment question

Discussion in 'Mac Apps and Mac App Store' started by novetan, May 27, 2011.

  1. novetan macrumors 6502

    Joined:
    Sep 3, 2010
    #1
    I was told by the vendor that Disk utility > first aid is similar to defragmenting the hard disc as in Window. I thought Mac don't need that? If not, what does it serve?
     
  2. robbieduncan Moderator emeritus

    robbieduncan

    Joined:
    Jul 24, 2002
    Location:
    London
    #2
    Which vendor? Anyway it's not. It does not move files around the disk surface to remove fragmentation. That is done automatically. What it does do is check for recoverable errors in the structures the file system uses to track which files are where on the disk.
     
  3. wrldwzrd89 macrumors G5

    wrldwzrd89

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    Jun 6, 2003
    Location:
    Solon, OH
    #3
    The function Disk Utility does when you click Repair Disk is akin to the "Check Volume for Errors" option in Windows XP, and similar options in Vista/7.
     
  4. novetan thread starter macrumors 6502

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    Sep 3, 2010
    #4

    Thanks guys. The vendor also told me we got to do this once in few months by clicking on "first aid" and let it run and when its over, there should be a noticeable difference in speed. All bullsh"t also?
     
  5. wrldwzrd89 macrumors G5

    wrldwzrd89

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    Location:
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    #5
    Fixing file system errors may speed up your Mac, but any difference will probably not be noticeable. This is because Mac OS X makes a bunch of file system-level optimizations behind the scenes, and this ability will only improve in Lion (and once Mac OS gets a ZFS-like file system that can heal itself).
     
  6. PatrickCocoa macrumors 6502a

    Joined:
    Dec 2, 2008
    #6
    Yes, yes it is.

    It's nonsense. You can do a quick before and after: time a few programs, run the first aid, then time those programs again. There will be no difference.
     
  7. GGJstudios macrumors Westmere

    GGJstudios

    Joined:
    May 16, 2008
    #7
    I understand your questions. Coming from decades using Windows, I was used to "maintaining" my system. One of the things I've enjoyed about using Mac OS X is the absolute lack of user work required to keep my system running well. Unless you have a specific issue that you're troubleshooting:
    • You don't need to defrag
    • You don't need to repair permissions
    • You don't need to run antivirus software
    • You don't need to run "maintenance" apps
    • You don't need to reset NVRAM/PRAM
    • You don't need to reset the SMC
    • You don't need to reformat
    • You don't need to reinstall your OS
    • You DO need to keep regular backups
    In short, just use your Mac. It will take care of itself without your involvement, in the vast majority of cases.

    I've been running the same installation of Mac OS X on my MBP for 3 years and I've never done any of the above. My Mac runs as fast and reliably as it did day one.
     
  8. matspekkie macrumors member

    Joined:
    Oct 19, 2010
    #8
    Mac osx does not need much (user) maintenance.
    Also don't fix if it is not broken. I did come across a few times where people would have a slow computer this was cause by a completely full drive. Try to keep at least 10 % space free on your system drive. And of course run updates once a while.
     
  9. jayducharme macrumors 68040

    jayducharme

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    #9
    With older OS X versions, running Repair Permissions monthly did noticeably speed up my system. Those versions of OS X ran a daily maintenance routine, but it only happened automatically if my machine was on between 3 and 5 in the morning. But since Snow Leopard, it doesn't seem to matter. Now the system just works.
     
  10. novetan thread starter macrumors 6502

    Joined:
    Sep 3, 2010
    #10
    Thanks so much guys. I trust what you guys are saying and I do understand salesman may not neccessary knowledgeable. I brought my MPB for upgrade to 8 RAM and the vendor run a Disk Warrior using his external source that took 10 mins, telling me its to rearrange the files to make searching faster and disk utility is a inferior version of it.

    Now that after getting assurance from you guys that nothing need to be done, I'm just curious do you guys know what is Disk Warrior?

    My com is running so much faster now, but believed its because of the overflowing RAM.
     
  11. GGJstudios macrumors Westmere

    GGJstudios

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    May 16, 2008
    #11
    Yes, I'm familiar with Disk Warrior. You don't need it.
     
  12. novetan thread starter macrumors 6502

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    Sep 3, 2010
    #12
    Thanks.
     
  13. maflynn Moderator

    maflynn

    Staff Member

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    Boston
    #13
    OSX only defrags only small files
     
  14. robbieduncan Moderator emeritus

    robbieduncan

    Joined:
    Jul 24, 2002
    Location:
    London
    #14
    Up to 20Mb. When that number was set that seemed like quite a big file size. Now RAW files off my EOS7D are bigger than that so perhaps it needs to be increased...
     
  15. Gregg2 macrumors 603

    Joined:
    May 22, 2008
    Location:
    Milwaukee, WI
    #15
    I ran TechTools Pro's Optimization utility today. According to the graph it generates, it was time. My disk is never as fragmented as my old G3, but I think it can't hurt to defragment OSX from time to time.
     
  16. novetan thread starter macrumors 6502

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    Sep 3, 2010
    #16
    Huh? After so many replies that advise its not neccessary to defrag, but you advise otherwise. !?!
     
  17. GGJstudios macrumors Westmere

    GGJstudios

    Joined:
    May 16, 2008
    #17
    You don't need to defrag. The only instance I've heard where that might be necessary is if you have difficulty creating a partition on a drive. Other than that, defragging is unnecessary on Mac OS X.
     
  18. Gregg2 macrumors 603

    Joined:
    May 22, 2008
    Location:
    Milwaukee, WI
    #18
    No, I didn't say it was necessary. What I am saying is that files become fragmented in OSX. Apple does not consider it to be a problem. As I noted, it's nowhere near the state of fragmentation I used to get in OS9. But, if you like to put all the fragments of a file adjacent to each other on your disc, it won't hurt to do so.
     

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