Dented Macbook Battery: Safe?

Is the battery safe to use?

  • Yes

    Votes: 0 0.0%
  • No

    Votes: 4 100.0%

  • Total voters
    4

seankerns

macrumors newbie
Original poster
Jan 29, 2019
7
0
Recently just bought an old 2013 Macbook Pro without a hard drive on eBay, and when I cracked it open, I found the previous (genius) owner had taped the SSD retention screw, along with a majority of the bottom cover screws, to the inside of the bottom cover- right over top of the battery. The previous owner then decided to screw 3 screws into the bottom cover for the journey through the mail. The battery now has a few slight marks and/or dents in it. I am wondering if this is cause for concern. There is no leaking, and the dents appear to be mostly superficial. Is this safe to use or should I invest the time and money to replace it? I have attached pictures... Thanks!
 

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Relentless Power

macrumors Nehalem
Jul 12, 2016
30,712
30,980
It’s likely safe to use. If you don’t see any swelling or expanding, It _should_ be fine to use. However, as a precaution, (If it was me), I would just replace the battery as a ‘safe bet.’
 

LogicalApex

macrumors 6502
Nov 13, 2015
494
434
I wouldn't use a Lithium Polymer battery where its outer shell has been compromised. The gashes are pretty deep...

Keep in mind, the reason these are considered non-user replaceable batteries is due to the soft shell that Lithium Polymer batteries have which makes them more susceptible to explosion. Additionally, that shell is designed to contain the battery cells if they collapse (this is what happens when you see battery swelling) and in this case the gouge could compromise the shells ability to contain such a failure and lead to an explosion.

That being said, I'm not a battery engineer so I may be overestimating the risk.
 

seankerns

macrumors newbie
Original poster
Jan 29, 2019
7
0
I wouldn't use a Lithium Polymer battery where its outer shell has been compromised. The gashes are pretty deep...

Keep in mind, the reason these are considered non-user replaceable batteries is due to the soft shell that Lithium Polymer batteries have which makes them more susceptible to explosion. Additionally, that shell is designed to contain the battery cells if they collapse (this is what happens when you see battery swelling) and in this case the gouge could compromise the shells ability to contain such a failure and lead to an explosion.

That being said, I'm not a battery engineer so I may be overestimating the risk.
Would you say that it is O.K. to function briefly? I would like to turn it on and make sure it functions properly before investing in a battery...