Developing for Dummies

Discussion in 'iPhone' started by Mykbibby, Mar 6, 2008.

  1. Mykbibby macrumors 6502a

    Mykbibby

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    Location:
    Palm Springs, CA
    #1
    This SDK announcement really inspired me today... the iPhone is unbelievable for this stuff, and I don't want to sit back and watch it fly, I want to write apps. Unfortunately, I don't have the faintest idea how. How do people get started writing apps? My ultimate goal will be to create apps in Xcode, so my question is where do I start if I don't know anything.

    Thanks, hopefully some seasoned developers can help me get started!
     
  2. Saikou macrumors 6502

    Saikou

    Joined:
    Aug 15, 2007
    Location:
    NE
    #2
    Actually, I'm in the same boat too. After watching the Keynote today, I became really inspired to really want to develop for the iPhone... But I'm not exactly sure where to start.

    Any seasoned developers have any tips on where to start? The most experience I have with anything coding related is HTML / CSS / and a bit of Flash's actionscript.
     
  3. Coca-Cola macrumors 6502

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  4. avalys macrumors 6502

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    Jun 4, 2004
    #4
    You need to start by learning Objective-C. You can probably get some books on it at the bookstore - or you could read the PDFs on the Apple iPhone Developer Center.

    Really, learning any object-oriented programming language (C++ or Java are the major ones) would be a good start - they're all pretty similar.

    Once you've done that, you can look at the examples on the iPhone Dev Center.

    Be warned, though - this is not something you can pick up and be productive with in a weekend. It will take you a good several months to be able to produce an application of real value - perhaps longer. However, you can probably figure out whether you will enjoy it in a weekend or two. :)
     
  5. Mykbibby thread starter macrumors 6502a

    Mykbibby

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    #5
    Do you know if any public colleges might offer a class in that? And if they do, does it matter whether its for windows or mac? Because I have no intention of writing apps for that terrible platform!
     
  6. twoodcc macrumors P6

    twoodcc

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    #6
    obj-C is basically just for mac. you can use it on windows, but not really
     
  7. Storm9 macrumors member

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    Dec 1, 2007
    #7
    Objective C is like C/C++. There are TONS of books on C++ might want to start there.
     
  8. benlangdon macrumors 65832

    benlangdon

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    Jan 13, 2008
    #8
    try computer science 1a
    at least at saddleback college
    i am taking it and its um... we are just writing programs write now by copying them. it been like a while in the class the 2 classes after this should be more intense
     
  9. pkoch1 macrumors 6502a

    pkoch1

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    Oct 3, 2007
    Location:
    Boston
    #9
    I am curious about this too. All I want to create is a simple application with a list of items in 4 or 5 folders, with a couple pictures and words when you click on them. It seems very simple, but I'm sure it's not. Off to Barnes and Noble tomorrow to get a book on C. Any suggestions of books (for complete beginners, who have basically no knowledge of programming) from anybody? Thanks!
     
  10. Mykbibby thread starter macrumors 6502a

    Mykbibby

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    #10
    Possibly the title of this thread?
     
  11. pkoch1 macrumors 6502a

    pkoch1

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    #11
    Haha, yeah that could be a good one. I've had some pretty good luck with the for Dummies books. C for Dummies? I think that's the one.

    Does anyone have any experience with this or other books?
     
  12. Mykbibby thread starter macrumors 6502a

    Mykbibby

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    #12
    How about Xcode for dummies? Does that work, or do you need skills going into Xcode?
     
  13. Storm9 macrumors member

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    Dec 1, 2007
    #13
    Xcode is just a IDE it will compile Java, C++, Objective-c, etc.
    Its no differnet than say DevC++ or JCreater
     
  14. pkoch1 macrumors 6502a

    pkoch1

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    #14
    Check this out. It looks like it starts you from the very beginning, but gets you acquainted with Xcode specifically. (And its free!)

    EDIT: it helps to include a link
    http://www.cocoalab.com/BecomeAnXcoder.pdf
     
  15. Mykbibby thread starter macrumors 6502a

    Mykbibby

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    #15
    Check what out?
     
  16. benlangdon macrumors 65832

    benlangdon

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    #16
    do they have one for c++ and i am getting no where try to use x code or eclipse. i only know code warrior which doesn't run on intel. there is way to many fing buttons
     
  17. pkoch1 macrumors 6502a

    pkoch1

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    #17
    I just bought Absolute Beginner's Guide to C (2nd edition) by Greg Perry. It is really helpful. Much moreso than the pdf I linked to. The pdf starts out very simple and clear, then all of a sudden I can't understand a word of it. This book by Perry is very clear for at least the first 50 pages or so (how far I've read)
     
  18. EdH macrumors newbie

    Joined:
    Jun 30, 2007
    #18
    There are some really good free videos on the iphone dev site I have been watching. I also bought Cocoa(R) Programming for Mac(R) OS X last week, and it is pretty good.

    I have a background with C/C++ and Java development, but never a mac developer. Personally I DONT think advising folks to learn C/C++ is going to make them an iPhone developer. The iPhone libraries, tools and nuances of objective-c are just too different. C/C++ is a good foundation for development work - but dont expect to learn it, and then immediately be an iPhone dev guru. If you want that, learn obj-c, xcode, iPhone libs etc..

    My .02
     
  19. riverfreak macrumors 6502a

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    Jan 10, 2005
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    Earth, mostly.
    #19
    In addition to books and courses (of course), a great way to learn to develop is to have a project in mind.

    Working towards a goal will keep you motivated. As you confront problems working towards that goal (ie adding the interface, doing network tasks), you'll learn new skills. Google is your friend.

    Another poster mentioned that you're not going to learn Obj-C in a weekend which is very true especially if you have no coding experience.

    But you can certainly learn to do things fairly quickly. That doesn't mean your code will be beautiful or extensible. I find the development process to actually be quite complicated since you're working with both the code and InterfaceBuilder. Lots of things to keep track of.

    By the way, writing HTML and CSS has nothing to do with coding whatsoever. That's non-iterative markup.
     
  20. kdarling macrumors demi-god

    kdarling

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    #20
    It's really too bad that one of the things developers are apparently prohibited from creating, are other languages.

    On WM phones, there are little BASICs and scripting languages that anyone can easily use. I can just see how an easy programming tool would be popular on the iPhone.

    (A blog somewhere brought up the realization that Java falls into this group. How will Sun do it without running afoul of this rule? ) If they do put Java on the phone, I'd say that'll be a much easier language to learn than Objective-C.
     
  21. semi5 macrumors newbie

    Joined:
    Dec 21, 2007
    #21
    I would not bother trying to learn plain C first as some people here have mentioned. I would start with an object oriented language like java or C#. It will help a lot when looking at objective-c examples to get your brain to wrap around the concept of objects and their importance.
     

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