Did improper shut down damage new Mac Pro?

Discussion in 'Mac Basics and Help' started by TenFour, Feb 14, 2008.

  1. TenFour macrumors member

    Joined:
    Feb 12, 2006
    #1
    Hi All,

    I just recieved a new Mac Pro and I know how to shut it down properly (I've owned many Macs). Yesterday, however, I accidentaly shut off my surge protector which my Mac Pro is plugged into. Did this improper shut down do any damage, in any way, to the computer? It seems to be running O.K., but I'm not sure I'd recognize any change in its operation because I've only had it for a few hours. Is there any way I can scan for damage etc. Any opinions and/or advice would be much appreciated.

    Thanks
     
  2. dpaanlka macrumors 601

    dpaanlka

    Joined:
    Nov 16, 2004
    Location:
    Illinois
    #2
    Probably not. What do you think happens when the electricity goes out. My advice is to go outside and relax.
     
  3. TenFour thread starter macrumors member

    Joined:
    Feb 12, 2006
    #3
    I thought about that... I was only concerned because the only precaution mentioned in the tiny Mac Pro manual is, precisely, to not shut off power to the computer unless it is the only option; so when a smoothly running computer suddenly has the plug pulled, I had to wonder why the manual had expressly advised against such action. I'm sure you're right, though, so I'll go outside now.
     
  4. dpaanlka macrumors 601

    dpaanlka

    Joined:
    Nov 16, 2004
    Location:
    Illinois
    #4
    If computers were that susceptible to damage from something as common as power outages, our society wouldn't depend on them anywhere near the extent that they do.

    That's what your surge protector is there for - to protect your computer from surges that often accompany power outages.
     
  5. Darth.Titan macrumors 68030

    Darth.Titan

    Joined:
    Oct 31, 2007
    Location:
    Austin, TX
    #5
    If you really want to set your mind at ease, boot into single user mode (Cmd-S at startup) and enter the command: fsck -yf That will find any minor disk errors and usually fix them as well.(Be patient it only takes a minute) If you get the "...appears to be OK" message type reboot and forget about it.
     
  6. TenFour thread starter macrumors member

    Joined:
    Feb 12, 2006
    #6
    Interesting... where do you folks learn this stuff?
     
  7. JNB macrumors 604

    JNB

    Joined:
    Oct 7, 2004
    Location:
    In a Hell predominately of my own making
    #7
    It's a Unix box, as bulletproof as they come. I've accidently yanked mains on HP-UX industrial servers with no ill effect.
     
  8. TenFour thread starter macrumors member

    Joined:
    Feb 12, 2006
    #8
    Pardon my ignorance, I can use computers, but I sure as h*ll can't program them. Is Mac Pro a UNIX box? Don't attack me, please... I'm just not in the know when it comes to computer languages etc. I'd sure like to learn, though!
    I'm like a car driver (not a race car driver, though)... I can steer and brake and park, but don't ask me what's under the hood.:D
     
  9. McGiord, Feb 17, 2008
    Last edited: Jan 30, 2011

    McGiord macrumors 601

    McGiord

    Joined:
    Oct 5, 2003
    Location:
    Dark Castle
    #9
    The MacOSX is based on UNIX, the command suggested above is to be entered via the Terminal, it's located in /Applications/Utilities/Terminal.

    You can also check the Hard Disk with Disk Utility.

    The way to learn about UNIX is with a UNIX tutorial, also there are some free ones, remember google is your best friend.
    ________
    Honda VTX1800F
     
  10. TenFour thread starter macrumors member

    Joined:
    Feb 12, 2006
    #10
    Cool... cool, so that's what the terminal is for! I'm gonna give some of this stuff a shot and, yes, I'll google it for sure. Can putting commands into the Terminal mess up Mr. Mac?
     
  11. mediaguru macrumors regular

    Joined:
    Nov 4, 2006
    Location:
    The middle of BentFork, TN
    #11
    Yes, you definitely want to be careful, especially when running commands as the "root" or "superuser" using SUDO (which you will often see here when people are giving out tips, etc).

    Another comment to add to the "procedure after an improper shutdown" topic is that I prefer to "Safe Boot" after a power failure by holding down SHIFT while booting. Like manually running a disk check, the safe boot process will automatically examine and rebuild the disk directory. Also, this is a good time to check and repair file permissions.
     
  12. yippy macrumors 68020

    yippy

    Joined:
    Mar 14, 2004
    Location:
    Chicago, IL
    #12
    Improper shutdown cannot damage the hardware. However there is a small chance that data could be damaged by it. However, even this is only possible if the computer is writing to the hard drive when it happens and even then only the files affected by the write that was in progress would be hurt as they would be incomplete.
     
  13. TenFour thread starter macrumors member

    Joined:
    Feb 12, 2006
    #13
    There are a lot of great responses here and yes, I will certainly be careful, or perhaps avoid altogether, messing around in the Terminal, because I'm man enough to admit that I don't know what I'm doing. The above response, however, is the most succinct and comforting yet; from it I can surmise the following:

    1. My hardware is O.K.
    2. I'm not concerned about info because my computer is so new.
    3. Nothing was writing anyways.

    As long as my hardware is O.K., I won't worry a bit... that was my only concern from the get-go. If hardware is O.K., I'm a happy fella!:cool:

    Thanks again for all the replies... much appreciated.
     
  14. McGiord, Feb 17, 2008
    Last edited: Jan 30, 2011

    McGiord macrumors 601

    McGiord

    Joined:
    Oct 5, 2003
    Location:
    Dark Castle
    #14
    Use man command

    Another good way to learn about UNIX commands is using the "man" command, in the Terminal type:
    man fsck

    It will display the details of how to use that "fsck" command.
    You can advance line by line with the up/down arrow keys, a whole page with the space bar and to exit the man display depress the Q key.

    Use this "man" command for every UNIX command you want to learn about.
    ________
    buy vaporizers
     

    Attached Files:

Share This Page