Did the Apple Store try to scam me?

Discussion in 'MacBook Pro' started by violinist67, Jan 10, 2015.

  1. violinist67 macrumors newbie

    Joined:
    Mar 18, 2012
    #1
    I bought my macbook pro in mid 2012 for college. Over time the trackpad clicker started to lose its click. I took it to the apple store in Madison. They checked out the computer and said that one of the liquid sensors went off right under the track pad, which was weird because I never remembered spilling anything on my laptop. They told me it would be a minimum of $500 to replace the trackpad and any potentially water damaged components. My computer was working fine except for the stuck trackpad so I said no. When I came home to Seattle I decided to give it another go since I felt I wasn't treated fairly. When I brought it to the apple store they checked it and found that none of the liquid sensors went off. Also they said there was no record or notes from my talk with the people at the Madison store which they apparently should have taken. The apple store in Seattle replaced my trackpad for free under my apple care policy. My question is if a liquid sensor goes off once, can that be detected or is it possible that the liquid could have dried up and the sensor reset when I got to Seattle? If a sensor can't be undone then I feel like I definitely was scammed. Maybe the people in Madison thought they could screw over a dumb college kid:mad:.
     
  2. JTravers macrumors 6502a

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    Jun 28, 2010
    #2
    Don't know about a scam, but the sensor turns red when it comes into contact with moisture. The color doesn't reverse unless it's tampered with.
     
  3. Intell macrumors P6

    Intell

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    #3
    There is a liquid sensor near the trackpad on that model that is designed to detect liquid spills.
     
  4. maflynn Moderator

    maflynn

    Staff Member

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    Boston
    #4
    I can't say for scam or not, but you can ask to see the blown sensor. It doesn't take much liquid to trip it. Could you have done so by spraying some sort of cleaner on the track pad?
     
  5. Apple fanboy macrumors P6

    Apple fanboy

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    #5
    What about sweat? Some people have very sweaty hands. Could that be enough? Or do you ever leave your laptop unattended? Maybe someone else spilt stuff on it?
     
  6. redheeler macrumors 603

    redheeler

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    #6
    Wonder that as well, since I do occasionally clean off my trackpad with liquid.
     
  7. maflynn Moderator

    maflynn

    Staff Member

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    #7
    Not because of the sensor, but I try to spray the cleaning cloth and use that moistness to clean off the trackpad. Tbh, I forgot about the liquid sensor.
     
  8. BasicGreatGuy Contributor

    BasicGreatGuy

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    #8
    Maybe you should learn what a scam is. You weren't scammed. Your device was repaired under warranty.

    As to the first employee, it is possible that the person was new, didn't look fully, or asked another employee (who didn't look at your Mac) what the problem could be, and that is how the initial assessment came to be. And the employee (for whatever reason) didn't enter every single thing into the computer at that time or shortly thereafter.

    Have you ever been wrong about <insert subject and question here> ? Yes, you have. We all have at one time or another.
     
  9. Ipadilac macrumors member

    Ipadilac

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    #9
    Well, I have to agree with the OP, cause if they had just went along with what the first store told them, they would have been out 500 dollars for a repair that should have been covered under warranty.
    Top it off with the fact the next person to look at it found no evidence the liquid detector had been activated in the first place.
    Seems fishy to me, and if it was a mistake made by the first tech to look at it, that person shouldn't of ever been working on it in the first place. no records of the first diagnoses ever happening?? what better way to cover tracks of you pocketing money for repairs?
     
  10. BasicGreatGuy Contributor

    BasicGreatGuy

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    #10
    There is no evidence of a scam. However, there is a lot assumption by the OP, which he or she uses as a foundation for the scam allegation. That is known as a logical fallacy. And you are using the same line of thinking with your retort to me.
     
  11. OneMike macrumors 601

    OneMike

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    Oct 19, 2005
    #11
    If the sensor wasn't tripped as the second store he took it to confirmed. Than yes, in my book that classifies as the first store trying to scam him.

    You're saying all hypothetical situations. OP posted what actually can be confirmed.
     
  12. BasicGreatGuy Contributor

    BasicGreatGuy

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    #12
    When one uses logical fallacy as the foundation for an argument, one can easily connect the dots to a scam.

    Not as many facts posted (re: first store) as are actually needed to make the claim of scam. If one assumes things not in evidence, then one can read assumed opinions as if they were facts.
     
  13. ilikewhey macrumors 6502

    Joined:
    May 14, 2014
    #13
    except the OP said they tried to scam him. he wasn't scammed, but had he paid out the 500 bucks it would be a scam. hence the title "try to scam"

    i think you are taking on apple's side a little too much, if what OP said is true, then the 1st rep didn't just not enter every single thing into the computer, it sounds like he didn't write up anything at all. i had this problem before too, apple online couldn't even find the service records on my mbp after i had it replaced.

    to OP


    applestore negligence is the worst part of the applecare experience, alot of members here will defend applestores simply because they haven't ran into a bad experience yet.
     
  14. chrfr macrumors 603

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    Jul 11, 2009
    #14
    What assumption is being made? The OP was told by the first store that the moisture sensor was tripped. The second store told him this was not the case.
     
  15. aristobrat macrumors G4

    Joined:
    Oct 14, 2005
    #15
    That's weird. When I worked at an Apple Store, no customer equipment could be opened unless it was "checked in", which involves the customer signing the normal disclosures. This always generated a "paper trail", which included a Repair ID that could later be referenced.

    Did you not sign anything before they took your laptop?

    To me, a scam is when something is done in a way where one person benefits at the expense of the other. I don't see any situation where an Apple employee would have benefit by purposing lying to you. They don't work on commission, and they're paid the same regardless of whether they're doing "in warranty" or "out of warranty" work. That's why this doesn't sound like a "scam" to me. But I guess it's all in what scam means to you.

    The best I can guess is that they were busy and didn't want to have to deal with another Mac to repair, so they gave you a high quote an hopped that you went away. But even then, they have the option to ship overflow repairs off to "the depot" for repair. So even that doesn't seem to be a big reason to "scam" someone.

    Weird.
     
  16. ixxx69 macrumors 6502a

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    Jul 31, 2009
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    United States
    #16
    Dude, take it down a notch. And his device was only repaired under warranty because he ignored the first Apple store's request for $500, and took it to a different Apple store. People around here can be so ridiculously pedantic about descriptive words... really who gives a rat's ass whether this falls under the legal definition of "scam"... the OP's just sharing an experience with an Apple store and looking for a little community feedback. The OP has every right to be upset.

    And everyone should be made aware that Apple Store employees can be full of b.s.. Some of them are fantastic and knowledgeable :), and some of them get all their technical info from user forums :(.

    Unfortunately this sort of thing happens. The best defense is to do your research, get second opinions, don't be afraid to press a little bit for additional information if something doesn't sound right.
     
  17. Gav2k macrumors G3

    Gav2k

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    Jul 24, 2009
    #17
    Back in 2010 when apple changed its stance on the iPhone water sensors (basically they changed the rules to state that multiple sensors need to be triggered before the warrenty is void) there was an article where they tested different liquids on the sensor.

    Basically they found certain alcohol based screen cleaners could trigger the sensor but when the alcohol evaporates the sensor returns to its off white colour.

    I'll continue to search for the article. But did you clean the trackpad by any chance?
     
  18. gngan macrumors 68000

    gngan

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    Jan 1, 2009
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    MacWorld
    #18
    That's exactly what scam means. If what OP said is true then the genius did not input the record/check-in so he could take the $500 into his pocket. That fits perfectly to what scam means to me.
     
  19. Willis macrumors 68020

    Willis

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    Apr 23, 2006
    Location:
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    #19
    Considering a trackpad repair is only £80.40 in the UK, I struggle to see why they didn't just tell you that. I think the $500 repair is the flat rate for depot repairs which the US mainly performs but even so, I don't feel you were treated in the way I'd expect.

    In Europe all repairs are done in store, only Beats and iPhone REP (battery & SWB) are depot.

    I'm glad that you got it repaired under warranty though as that seems like the most logical solution here.
     
  20. violinist67 thread starter macrumors newbie

    Joined:
    Mar 18, 2012
    #20
    Yeah the more I think about it, "scam" seems like a harsh word and far from reality. I did use a screen cleaner on the screen and the keyboard so maybe its possible that the the cleaner set off the sensor and then evaporated. The apple store in Wisconsin was extremely packed like most apple stores seem to be which may explain why they didn't take time to record my meeting. Then again when I told the story to the manager in Seattle he seemed pretty disturbed and couldn't believe I actually was at another apple store. I guess the real reason I made this post is because I want to know whether or not I should complain to the apple store about the service I got and also if I have a problem in Madison again should I just avoid the apple store all together and go to a different repair service?
     
  21. Willis macrumors 68020

    Willis

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    #21
    I feel your concerns should be escalated and email the store, (storename@apple.com) or, if you have the feedback email from your Genius appointment, use that. I know from experience, feedback is read and shared with team members who did the appointment.

    Look at it this way, if you share your feedback to Apple, they can take actions to ensure the same issue doesn't occur again by the Genius in question.
     
  22. BasicGreatGuy Contributor

    BasicGreatGuy

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    Sep 21, 2012
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    #22
    So, it could very well be, that all the Madison store is guilty of, is failing to record and document your visit like they should have. The tech could have very well been right and your post here gives a little more background towards that possibility.

    And to others in the thread who were so quick to jump on the scam bandwagon and reply to me as if I was blind and biased for Apple, you might want to think long and hard next time something like this comes up.

    Like I said earlier, logical fallacies do not make for good foundations.
     
  23. aristobrat macrumors G4

    Joined:
    Oct 14, 2005
    #23
    The Genius out front working the bar diagnoses the machine. If it looks like it might be hardware, the machine goes into the queue and gets worked on later. It's not likely that Genius will be the one to fix it, and less likely that Genius will be the one giving it back/collecting payment whenever the customer comes back in to pick it up.

    It's even more unlikely that a customer is going to pay cash for such a large repair. And every bit of it (the repair and collecting of payment) is recorded on video.

    That'd be quite the scam to pull off successfully!
     
  24. duervo macrumors 68000

    duervo

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    Feb 5, 2011
    #24
    Scam indeed ... Boom, baby.

    (If that went over anybody's head, then check out the South Park episode, "About Last Night.")
     
  25. GoingDark macrumors 6502

    Joined:
    Nov 2, 2013
    #25
    It seems more like evidence of gross incompetence than a deliberate scam.

    This is all anecdotal evidence of course but I've noticed extreme inconsistency from genius to genius, even at the same Apple store. I've had both the best and the worst customer service experiences in my life with two separate genius appointments at one particular Apple store.

    The unfortunate lesson to take away from this is that you should always get a second opinion, as Apple Geniuses aren't what they used to be.
     

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