Did you get ripped off too?!

stubeeef

macrumors 68030
Original poster
Aug 10, 2004
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Between Choicepoint , and LexisNexis, it seems that atleast some of the members here have had their info lifted from the computers of collectors.

this is starting to really worry me, to wake up one morning and find out I've been emptied, just scares the crap out of me.
Data thieves strike again, filching info on up to 32,000
By Jim Hopkins, USA TODAY

In the second case of its kind in the past month, a company said Wednesday that thieves had stolen Social Security (news - web sites) numbers and other data on up to 32,000 U.S. consumers.
LexisNexis, a data broker, said it discovered the breach in the past 10 days in a review of procedures at Seisint, a Florida firm it bought last year that already was the subject of controversy.

LexisNexis said it referred the case to federal law enforcement officials. The FBI (news - web sites) said it is investigating.

The company will notify the 32,000 consumers whose identities may have been stolen. And it will help them monitor credit reports and other accounts for signs of mischief, such as unauthorized purchases.

The disclosure follows that of rival ChoicePoint, which last month said thieves may have gotten access to at least 145,000 Social Security numbers and other consumer data. Also, DSW shoe stores said Tuesday that a hacker stole credit card and other data of customers at 103 of its 175 stores in the past three months.
 

Chip NoVaMac

macrumors G3
Dec 25, 2003
8,894
31
Northern Virginia
daveway00 said:
Is the same story I heard a few weeks ago about a bank that was hacked into in California?
Actually it was Bank of America that lost a tape with government credit card holders info on it. Maybe since some members of congress info was on the tape, maybe now they will take action to make banks and credit card companies more accountable for credit card fraud and identity theft. It is the least these companies can do with the sweetheart bankruptcy bill being passed for their contributions.
 

Doctor Q

Administrator
Staff member
Sep 19, 2002
37,698
3,812
Los Angeles
To deal with privacy concerns, Choicepoint has hired someone to "oversee improvements in ChoicePoint's screening process and implementation of procedures to expedite the reporting of incidents."

News story:
The Alpharetta, Georgia-based company said Carol A. DiBattiste, deputy administrator of the Transportation Security Administration, has been appointed as the company's chief credentialing, compliance and privacy officer.​
And what would this position be called for short? Why, C3PO, of course! (I read this anecdote in InformationWeek magazine.)
 

Chip NoVaMac

macrumors G3
Dec 25, 2003
8,894
31
Northern Virginia
Doctor Q said:
News story:
The Alpharetta, Georgia-based company said Carol A. DiBattiste, deputy administrator of the Transportation Security Administration, has been appointed as the company's chief credentialing, compliance and privacy officer.​
And what would this position be called for short? Why, C3PO, of course! (I read this anecdote in InformationWeek magazine.)
Well, if they would only hire C3PO for the job, then it might be done properly! :D
 

MongoTheGeek

macrumors 68040
Yeah. It scares me too. I've always gone along with Locke's philosophy that our work and our earnings are actually our life. A $20 bill is an hour or my life that I had to spend working to earn. Robbing me of $20 is taking that hour out of my life.

If I were cleaned out fraudulently, I would be sorry tempted to call the whole social contract null and void and give the state of nature a go.

I came up with the perfect punishment for these people after the jail time though. Place a restriction on them that the only financial transactions they can make are in cash. They wouldn't be allowed to have a bank account, a check book. They couldn't have credit cards. They can't even get a money order to pay utility bills. They have to go wherever and pay cash.
 

ziwi

macrumors 65816
Jan 6, 2004
1,087
0
Right back where I started...
This needs to stop or the institutions need to be held $$$$ accountable. Either that or we could keep moving $$$ from one place to another all the time...it is scary that you have no recourse.

It is as bad as the SS# 'reusability' issue here in the states. We the people in the end have no rights and blindly allow / trust others to 'hold' the $$ or vital information about us and have no recourse for any issues they allow to happen.
 

etoiles

macrumors 6502a
Jun 12, 2002
826
4
Where the air is crisp
ziwi said:
It is as bad as the SS# 'reusability' issue here in the states. We the people in the end have no rights and blindly allow / trust others to 'hold' the $$ or vital information about us and have no recourse for any issues they allow to happen.
I totally agree.
The SS# becomes a key in this 'credit history' system (do any other countries even have a credit history ? How about privacy ?), yet you have to give it to random people (dentist, rental places, store credit cards....)... and unlike a credit card number, you can't just cancel/change it... :mad:
 

MongoTheGeek

macrumors 68040
etoiles said:
I totally agree.
The SS# becomes a key in this 'credit history' system (do any other countries even have a credit history ? How about privacy ?), yet you have to give it to random people (dentist, rental places, store credit cards....)... and unlike a credit card number, you can't just cancel/change it... :mad:
Oddly enough using the social security number for anything besides social security is illegal. It used to be at least.

In theory they can't even ask for it on your income tax.
 

Mr. Durden

macrumors 6502a
Jan 13, 2005
716
0
Colorado
I used to work as an investigator and its amazing what you can do once you have someones SS#. And the thing is, people tend to just give it out whever they are asked for it.

For example, information at the DMV (department of motor vehicles) is considered public, so if you go to the DMV and ask for someones records, all you have to do is go to the original application for a drivers license and gues whats usually there? Yep. SS#. The stupid thing is that its not even a mandatory field to fill in. But noone tells you that, so most people fill it in and all off a sudden anyone with the idea to actually ask for the info has it.

Once you have the SS#, everything is open to you because people assume that if you have the SS# you must be legit. Very scary actually.
 

clayj

macrumors 604
Jan 14, 2005
7,478
205
visiting from downstream
MongoTheGeek said:
I came up with the perfect punishment for these people after the jail time though. Place a restriction on them that the only financial transactions they can make are in cash. They wouldn't be allowed to have a bank account, a check book. They couldn't have credit cards. They can't even get a money order to pay utility bills. They have to go wherever and pay cash.
I prefer my solution: If someone steals your identity, they are you, right? And there's no law against harming yourself... so, if someone steals your identity, you should be allowed to beat the motherlovin' crap out of them... you're only harming yourself, right? Knock their teeth out, gouge their eyes, knee them in the balls, you name it. Anything short of killing them (since in most places there are laws against suicide).

I'm being absolutely serious here, BTW. Identity theft is absolutely unforgivable and anyone who does it to me is going to find themselves in a world of hurt if I find them. :mad:
 

Doctor Q

Administrator
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Sep 19, 2002
37,698
3,812
Los Angeles
When restaurants give out those forms saying "tell us your birthday", I never fill in my real birthday. None of their business and they don't really care. So I get cards all year saying "It's your birthday! Buy a lobster dinner and get a free cup of coffee!" or whatever they say to entice me for my birthday meal.

And I don't use my bank PIN as my computer password as some teachers I know do.
 

wdlove

macrumors P6
Oct 20, 2002
16,568
0
Here in Massachusetts when I renewed my drivers license several years ago I had my SS# removed. They just choose a number at random. It is very scar how vulnerable we have become to identity thread. I learned the hard way that many places on the internet the consider your birthday as your signature. Causing a legal obligation. Luckily with a phone call I was able to cancel the transaction, actually it took two. I kept notes so that helped.

I can't think of the name of the company at the moment, but they advertise on our local radio station. Its essentially a credit watch. The purpose of membership fee is that they will monitor your credit and notify of any changes. There is also an insurance policy that can be used to repair a person's credit. Has anyone else thought about this program or current subscribes?
 

Eastend

macrumors 6502
Aug 1, 2004
376
7
Nara, Japan
clayjohanson said:
I prefer my solution: If someone steals your identity, they are you, right? And there's no law against harming yourself... so, if someone steals your identity, you should be allowed to beat the motherlovin' crap out of them... you're only harming yourself, right? Knock their teeth out, gouge their eyes, knee them in the balls, you name it. Anything short of killing them (since in most places there are laws against suicide).

I'm being absolutely serious here, BTW. Identity theft is absolutely unforgivable and anyone who does it to me is going to find themselves in a world of hurt if I find them. :mad:
Never thought of that one. If they caught you the court case against you would be interesting. Not only the court case would be interesting, but the newspaper headlines would be more interesting, "Man almost beats himself to death for stealing his own identity". That's if you follow the logic.

Brian
 

clayj

macrumors 604
Jan 14, 2005
7,478
205
visiting from downstream
Eastend said:
Never thought of that one. If they caught you the court case against you would be interesting. Not only the court case would be interesting, but the newspaper headlines would be more interesting, "Man almost beats himself to death for stealing his own identity". That's if you follow the logic.

Brian
Well, it makes sense to me... they steal your identity and screw up your life (your ability to buy a house, a car, get a job, a loan, whatever)... you should have the right to screw up THEIR life, for as long as your life remains screwed up.

I can see the testimony now: "Your Honor, this person pretended to be me. I just carried out his wishes, and treated him as if he WERE me. And I felt like beating the crap out of myself. How is that a crime?" :)
 

stubeeef

macrumors 68030
Original poster
Aug 10, 2004
2,702
2
I think they have to put some real teeth in sentencing these people! I bought a shredder this year and shred more than ollie north now, paranoia I guess, but with all the junk mail credit cards, and other crap I am nervous about it.

Clay, nice avatar btw! :p
 

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