Did you know you can assign a static IP in your router settings?

Discussion in 'Mac Accessories' started by PicnicTutorials, Feb 22, 2014.

  1. PicnicTutorials macrumors 6502a

    PicnicTutorials

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    #1
  2. Intell macrumors P6

    Intell

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    #2
    That isn't the same as a DynDNS service. That's DHCP reservations. While most routers have it, a few low end or early routers ones don't.
     
  3. PicnicTutorials thread starter macrumors 6502a

    PicnicTutorials

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    Yes i know its different. Thats what I'm saying. If your router has it you don't need dyndns. And yes dhcp is what its called on mine
     
  4. chrfr macrumors 603

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    #4
    No, this has no bearing whatsoever on whether or not you need a dynamic DNS service. This only affects addresses inside your local network and won't help you find your network when you're outside it.
     
  5. PicnicTutorials thread starter macrumors 6502a

    PicnicTutorials

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    You may very well be correct this is not my urea of expertise but I'm not so sure. The fact that your ip changes is the whole reason you need a dyn account in the first place ya? I know there is a outside and inside ip but huh. Maybe I'm wrong. Either way its useful.
     
  6. Intell macrumors P6

    Intell

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    The DHCP reservations that you control through your router are only for your internal IP addresses. Your ISP controls your external IP address and that can change almost daily. Because that the constant and unpredictable changing, a need for a DynDNS service exists.
     
  7. xraydoc macrumors demi-god

    xraydoc

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    #7
    You're wrong. Sorry. Not trying to be rude. Your link doesn't affect your public IP address, just the IP addresses of the devices inside your personal network.

    Now, depending on your ISP, your public IP may change frequently or rarely (or never if you pay for a static IP address). But if it changes often, a dynamic IP service will ensure you can always find it from the outside should you have the need.
     
  8. RMo macrumors 65816

    RMo

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    #8
    ...and (s)he is.

    Yes. The fact that your public IP address is dynamic is generally the reason you would use a service like DnyDNS that will help you associate a domain name (constant) with a static IP address (potentially variable). For most home networks, this is referring to their only publicly addressable IP address, generally that of their router. Other devices that connect to that router generally have local-only IP addresses and are not accessible from the Internet. The router, by default, generally assigns these local IP addresses dynamically using a built-in DHCP server. You can assign your local IP addresses statically all you want with your router, but the one publicly addressable IP address you have won't care. A DynDNS hostname, for example, will refer only to your public IP address. That's all it can refer to. The rest are specific to your home network and belong to a range of addresses that are not in use on the Internet because they are reserved specifically for private use.

    (There are exceptions. You may have purchased a block of static IP addresses from your ISP and may be able to assign these to local devices. You would know if you did this. You did not.)

    Sorry, but you are.

    It is useful, but mostly within your home network. For example, if you want to add a printer to a computer based on a static IP rather than using Bonjour or something to find it for you, or if you have a device that you need to access all the time and an IP address works better than a hostname. It is also convenient if you do Port Forwarding (now we're talking external usage...) on Apple's routers, since they forward a specified publicly exposed port to a specified local IP address and port, and since you have to use an IP address rather than a host name to configure this, you'll probably want to make sure you have a static IP on that device.

    But alone, it does very little for helping you access your home network from the outside world--and without a dynamic DNS service or knowledge of what your public IP address happens to be at that time, it does nothing at all.
     

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