Difference between 5400 & 7200 RPM HDs

Discussion in 'Buying Tips and Advice' started by MikeyTree, Jun 5, 2007.

  1. MikeyTree macrumors 6502

    Joined:
    Jan 5, 2007
    #1
    What effect does getting the faster 7200 RPM hard drive have on a MBP's speed? With student discount, a fast 160 gig is $135 more than a 5400, but I don't know if it's worth it.

    I don't do 3D rendering. I do play games, use garageband (maybe Logic too, eventually) and sometimes use photoshop, but not professionally.
     
  2. iToaster macrumors 68000

    iToaster

    Joined:
    May 3, 2007
    Location:
    In front of my MacBook Pro
    #2
    The faster hard drive will increase the speed of some aspects of the MBP. The HD is the slowest thing in a computer, so the faster it is, the faster the computer will be, although there is a capacity to speed relationship. Go for the faster one if you can afford it.
     
  3. pianodude123 macrumors 6502a

    pianodude123

    Joined:
    Mar 1, 2005
    Location:
    in the internet
    #3
    I, too, have this question. I am wondering whether buying the upgraded 7200 RPM hard drive is worth the money.

    Also... is it more unreliable?
     
  4. Igantius macrumors 65816

    Joined:
    Apr 29, 2007
    #4
    The big speed difference comes with sustained read/write periods - e.g. as when editing video (although in that instance you should be using an external drive as your scratch disk).

    With smaller read/write periods (e.g. booting and normal operations) there's very little in it. 7200rpm drive use more power, especially when fairly full.

    Beatfeats.com have done some tests with different drives in MBPs, which is well worth a look.
     
  5. epochblue macrumors 68000

    epochblue

    Joined:
    Aug 12, 2005
    Location:
    Nashville, TN
    #5
    If you have periods of really long reads or writes, the 7200 will make the computer a little hotter, but nothing to worry about, probably.

    If you can afford it, you might notice quicker loading times and the like with the 7200rpm drive. Anything that the OS has to go out to disk for could be quicker with the 7200rpm drive.

    Like a poster above said, if you can afford it, you might as well get it. And like Ignatius said, it can be a drain on the battery if you're doing long reads/writes....so take that for what you will.
     
  6. pianodude123 macrumors 6502a

    pianodude123

    Joined:
    Mar 1, 2005
    Location:
    in the internet
    #6
    Why no NAND 2 second startup times in this revision?
     
  7. ihabia macrumors newbie

    Joined:
    May 25, 2007
    Location:
    italy
    #7
    You will enjoy the difference every day when you boot your mac.
    Without Robson flash drive I would have no doubt: 7200rpm! It's worth to wait 3/4 week to have it...
     
  8. Mydel macrumors 6502a

    Mydel

    Joined:
    Apr 8, 2006
    Location:
    Sometimes here mostly there
    #8
    I pulled the trigger on 2.4GHz with 5400 drive. Not willing to wait 4-6 weeks. But I plan to put there SSD. SanDisk is supposed to be shipping 64GB within 500$ range in Q3 2007...:D
     
  9. redAPPLE macrumors 68030

    redAPPLE

    Joined:
    May 7, 2002
    Location:
    2 Much Infinite Loops
    #9
    this is slightly off topic, but maybe it is ok to discuss it here.

    using 5400 rpm external hard drives is said to be a big no no.

    according to information i read, please don't quote me on this, when editing videos, using the external drive as an iTunes music storage (and then playing the music with party shuffle) etc. is not a good idea with a 5400 rpm drive.
     
  10. apcpa2000 macrumors member

    apcpa2000

    Joined:
    Jun 5, 2007
    Location:
    Florida
    #10
    Why use a scratch disk? I am new to the mac thing, and am thinking about how to outfit my first mac.

    Thanks
     
  11. redAPPLE macrumors 68030

    redAPPLE

    Joined:
    May 7, 2002
    Location:
    2 Much Infinite Loops
    #11
    LOL

    in the beginning, i asked the same question. now after learning to use scratch disks, it all became to automatic, that i can't even explain or answer the question "why use a scratch disk?"

    but let me try.

    the os and the apps are usually stored and runs from your local drive.

    let us say, you edit videos. the scratch disks should lessen the strain on your local drive(s).

    i believe there is a better explanation.
     
  12. redAPPLE macrumors 68030

    redAPPLE

    Joined:
    May 7, 2002
    Location:
    2 Much Infinite Loops
    #12
    LOL

    in the beginning, i asked the same question. now after learning to use scratch disks, it all became too automatic, that i can't even explain or answer the question "why use a scratch disk?"

    but let me try.

    the os and the apps are usually stored and runs from your local drive.

    let us say, you edit videos. the scratch disks should lessen the strain on your local drive(s).

    i believe there is a better explanation.
     
  13. KYBOSH macrumors member

    Joined:
    Jun 2, 2007
    #13
    If your up to it you can install the 7200 rpm HD yourself. Got mine from Newegg and it only cost me $105. Gonna install it when the Macbook comes in. Cant wait!
     
  14. Aniej macrumors 68000

    Aniej

    Joined:
    Oct 17, 2006
  15. thebrain74 macrumors regular

    Joined:
    Feb 25, 2006
    #15
    A scratch disk is a large (usually external) disk that is used often times by people who do large amounts of pic/audio and especially video. These tasks often times create many files and/or very large files (re: video) that are often deleted, changed, moved, etc. Becuase of this and this system slowdown inherent with a full or nearly full Boot drive (the one your OS & apps are on) many people like to use a scratch disk and they can fill it and have no worries.


    This is what I know about them, I could be wrong, but I think thats the general idea behind them...anyone feel free to correct me.
     
  16. Igantius macrumors 65816

    Joined:
    Apr 29, 2007
    #16
    That is the idea, yes - thanks for saving me the effort! They're used as temporary space for applications like Final Cut and Photoshop and as a substitute for RAM.

    If you don't use an app that asks you to assign a scratch disk, then you can forget all about them!
     
  17. aaronw1986 macrumors 68030

    Joined:
    Oct 31, 2006
    #17
    Cheap yes, but voids warranty.
     
  18. Jblack4083 macrumors regular

    Joined:
    Jun 4, 2007
    #18
    do you have to unscrew stuff to install a new one or does it just pop into the bottom? how do you install a new one
     
  19. Illicit macrumors 6502

    Joined:
    May 14, 2007
    Location:
    Waterloo, ON
    #19
    you need to take apart your laptop bottom and replace the old one, voiding warranty. the HD isn't user-replaceable for the mbp.
     
  20. zioxide macrumors 603

    zioxide

    Joined:
    Dec 11, 2006
    #20
    Apple can't tell if you've opened up your laptop as long as you don't **** anything up inside. So buy a new hard drive and put it in yourself (it's easy, check the ifixit guide). If you need to take it in for warranty service, then just put the old hard drive back in and they'll never know the difference.
     
  21. aaronw1986 macrumors 68030

    Joined:
    Oct 31, 2006
    #21
    I'd still be worried! One simple mistake and..
     
  22. matperk macrumors 6502

    Joined:
    May 6, 2004
    Location:
    Milwaukee, Wisconsin
    #22
    I currently have a rev. A MBP w/ the 7200rpm 100gb internal drive. I have on order the new 250gb 5400rpm Western Digital drive. I actually do all of my video/audio recording to an external drive which is 7200rpm (my current internal will become one as well).

    I can't really speak for the difference in how it runs, as I'm not sure yet...but I'll be sure to post here when I do.

    I know I'd much rather have more space and just deal w/ recording to externals. When I'm on the road, the most complicated thing I do is run parallels.

    PS I am getting it installed by a certified apple tech i know as not to void my applecare.
     
  23. weckart macrumors 68040

    Joined:
    Nov 7, 2004
    #23

    How much is he charging for the job? I'd rather pay a reasonable amount than risk denting or breaking my MBP. However careful you are, there is always one mystery screw left over after you have put everything back together again.
     
  24. Much Ado macrumors 68000

    Much Ado

    Joined:
    Sep 7, 2006
    Location:
    UK
    #24
    Correct, for example i've just finished editing a huge video file with over 6 hours of raw footage. I kept it all on a scratch disk so it didn't clog up my main HD.
     

Share This Page