Differences in OSX and iOS Development ?

Discussion in 'Mac Programming' started by Will0827, Jun 4, 2014.

  1. Will0827 macrumors regular

    Will0827

    Joined:
    Aug 11, 2008
    #1
    I've been on and off learning objective c for the pass two years and could build basic apps with out to much diffuculty. Im going through the swift book now to get a grasp on that but still learning from my objective c books. I never really dove into trying to make anything for osx, always have done examples for iOS. Are there any major differences between the two to take into consideration when developing a OSX app. Apart obviously from the system specific apis.
     
  2. whooleytoo macrumors 603

    whooleytoo

    Joined:
    Aug 2, 2002
    Location:
    Cork, Ireland.
    #2
    The biggest difference might be the use of UIKit instead of AppKit, most notably using UIViews / UIViewControllers / UIWindows / UIWindowControllers instead of NSViews / NSViewControllers / NSWindows / NSWindowControllers etc.

    iOS apps (typically) have a simpler visual structure due to the smaller screen size and the need for controls to be large enough for a touch-screen; and the respective view / window classes reflect this.
     
  3. mfram macrumors 65816

    Joined:
    Jan 23, 2010
    Location:
    San Diego, CA USA
    #3
    Another difference between Smartphone apps and Computer apps are often times the style of interface. Smartphones have evolved to be smallish screens that are touch-based. The user doesn't have a whole lot of precision when selecting items in the interface. And gestures on the screen using the finger are a natural interface.

    With computers, the monitors are typically higher resolution. People are typically using mice and/or trackpads which generally have a lot more precision moving the mouse pointer. However, gestures are generally not as natural.

    This means you should probably design your UI to be more natural for each type of device. I'd guess the 'optimal' Smartphone interface will look different than the 'optimal' computer interface.

    Of course, Windows 8.1 tries to straddle the fence of both worlds, making no one happy. :D
     

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