Different DVI types... Advice?

Discussion in 'Buying Tips and Advice' started by cjbriare, Jul 24, 2009.

  1. cjbriare macrumors member

    cjbriare

    Joined:
    Nov 8, 2008
    Location:
    Las Vegas, NV
    #1
    Hello, I am going to be buying a Mac mini soon, and I am keeping my eye on a HP monitor that I want to get. It uses DVI-D, and the apple Mini DVI to DVI cable that comes with the mini is DVI-I.

    Will it work with a DVI-D connector? I saw another post regarding this issue, but some people were saying it will work, and some said it wouldn't. I just want a clear answer.

    Thanks for all your support.
     
  2. MacMini2009 macrumors 68000

    MacMini2009

    Joined:
    May 22, 2009
    Location:
    California
    #2
    The adapter that comes with a Mac Mini is a Mini-DVI to DVI-D adapter so your fine.
     
  3. cjbriare thread starter macrumors member

    cjbriare

    Joined:
    Nov 8, 2008
    Location:
    Las Vegas, NV
    #3
    Well, seeing that your running a mac mini with an hp monitor, I can trust you know what it is, so thanks for the answer. I can also confirm it with the guys at the apple store too. But, thanks again.
     
  4. MacMini2009 macrumors 68000

    MacMini2009

    Joined:
    May 22, 2009
    Location:
    California
    #4
    No problem.
     
  5. AllieNeko macrumors 6502a

    Joined:
    Sep 25, 2003
    #5
    This is only an issue with cables. You need to be sure to buy DVI-D cables.

    This could have and should have been handled better. There's three types of DVI:

    DVI-D - The digital format we know as DVI
    DVI-I - Many video cards have this, it has DVI and analog video on it
    DVI-A - Analog only.

    DVI-A connectors don't really exist but are in the specification. The problem that comes up is that many cables are DVI-I (have the extra pins for analog) but connectors on devices that are digital only do NOT have the extra pins for analog.

    The answer was simple had it been in the standard - ALL devices should use the DVI-I connector even if they only supported digital. Then the extra pins, even if unused, could fit. The DVI-D connector should not exist but it does so we have to live with it.

    Thankfully, there's a simple answer - unlike in the early days of DVI, it's easy to get a DVI-D cable (cable without the analog pins).

    Boo to the manufacturers who decided using a connector that blocked the insertion of a DVI-I cable (which would have worked just fine) was a good idea.... :(

    P.S. I can understand WHY to some geek the concept of a DVI-D connector was a good idea - one quick look at the number of pins and you can tell if a device supports analog or not. Great idea, EXCEPT WHEN YOU HAVE A DEVICE WITH A DVI-D CONNECTOR AND A DVI-I CABLE!!!!!!!!!! Like many ideas that sound good on paper, they're just frustration in the real world!
     

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