Discovering the Jelly Bean Constant

Discussion in 'Community Discussion' started by nbs2, Apr 4, 2007.

  1. nbs2 macrumors 68030

    nbs2

    Joined:
    Mar 31, 2004
    Location:
    A geographical oddity
    #1
    So the question is this (clearly inspired by a contest here at work) - is there a constant, generally applicable, that can be multiplied by the volume of a given container, to discover the number of jelly beans in that container.

    Clearly packing inefficiencies would make an exact number impossible, but it is possible to find one that is generally applicable (say plus/minus .5%)?
     
  2. princealfie macrumors 68030

    princealfie

    Joined:
    Mar 7, 2006
    Location:
    Salt Lake City UT
    #2
    Solid spherical or ellipsoid shapes never have a packing density higher than 75%. It's 74% for spheres, 75% for ellipsoids (plus some change in each case)

    Random packing is usually around 65%.
     
  3. nbs2 thread starter macrumors 68030

    nbs2

    Joined:
    Mar 31, 2004
    Location:
    A geographical oddity
    #4
    I saw that site earlier - it just seemed like they picked a number that "sounded right." It seems like an experiment that is just begging to be done. That should take care of my daughter's science fair experiments for at least a couple of year.:D
     

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