Do I enable TRIM on my Kingston HyperX 240GB Drive?

Kmad86

macrumors member
Original poster
Sep 11, 2009
50
0
I recently purchased a Kingston HyperX 240GB drive. I've read this is similar to the Critical M4 drive. I've had people tell me that I need to enable TRIM and all but this is my first SSD drive and some of the new stuff I have been reading says that the newer drives don't need TRIM enabled because of something new in them?

Any idea if I should run it or not? It's running fantastic.

Right now 312MB/sec Write and 483 MB/sec read.

I just don't want to mess anything up, so I thought I would check.
 

JTToft

macrumors 68040
Apr 27, 2010
3,405
754
Aarhus, Denmark
Well, you're not hurting anything by enabling it. If you run into problems, you can simply disable it again.

I just installed a Samsung 830 into my MacBook Pro a couple of days ago and am planning on running it without TRIM for the first week. After the first week, I'll enable TRIM to see if it makes a difference. If I see no change or a positive change, I'll leave it enabled. If I see a negative change, I'll just disable it again.

So far, it's running beautifully, by the way! :)
 

thermodynamic

Suspended
May 3, 2009
1,340
1,175
USA
To my understanding, TRIM incorporates a usage algorithm so that the same memory blocks don't get written to excessively, resulting in a much longer lifespan of the SSD.

How flash RAM holds storage is rather different to mechanical platter-based HDDs.

So don't defragment a SSD either; the SSD shows itself to the OS as a regular HDD and the defragment software won't know any difference... if the SSD isn't organizing the how and where as to where blocks are filled up, you'll fry the drive in no time. (100k write lifespan per block. It can add up quickly, especially when TRIM is not enabled.)

If there's even a 50MB/s drop in performance, 350-50 = far higher than the 100MB/s the HDD could ever hope to do.

Leave it on and enabled.

Always.
 

Kmad86

macrumors member
Original poster
Sep 11, 2009
50
0
To my understanding, TRIM incorporates a usage algorithm so that the same memory blocks don't get written to excessively, resulting in a much longer lifespan of the SSD.

How flash RAM holds storage is rather different to mechanical platter-based HDDs.

So don't defragment a SSD either; the SSD shows itself to the OS as a regular HDD and the defragment software won't know any difference... if the SSD isn't organizing the how and where as to where blocks are filled up, you'll fry the drive in no time. (100k write lifespan per block. It can add up quickly, especially when TRIM is not enabled.)

If there's even a 50MB/s drop in performance, 350-50 = far higher than the 100MB/s the HDD could ever hope to do.

Leave it on and enabled.

Always.

Hmm, interesting.
 

AfzalivE

macrumors member
Jun 13, 2012
77
4
To my understanding, TRIM incorporates a usage algorithm so that the same memory blocks don't get written to excessively, resulting in a much longer lifespan of the SSD.

How flash RAM holds storage is rather different to mechanical platter-based HDDs.

So don't defragment a SSD either; the SSD shows itself to the OS as a regular HDD and the defragment software won't know any difference... if the SSD isn't organizing the how and where as to where blocks are filled up, you'll fry the drive in no time. (100k write lifespan per block. It can add up quickly, especially when TRIM is not enabled.)

If there's even a 50MB/s drop in performance, 350-50 = far higher than the 100MB/s the HDD could ever hope to do.

Leave it on and enabled.

Always.
Can you cite a source for "the ssd is showing itself as a regular HDD"? If you check Disk Utility, it can clearly tell that it's an SSD, surely they must've implemented separate things for them.