Do I have a different Watch than other people?

Discussion in 'Apple Watch' started by Rogifan, Sep 9, 2015.

  1. Rogifan macrumors P6

    Rogifan

    Joined:
    Nov 14, 2011
    #1
    Someone in my Twitter feed posted this long rant about how the Watch is not a good 1.0 product whereas all of Apple's other products were. I could quibble with them about the first gen iPad or Mackbook Air being good but aside from that I guess I just don't understand the "it's a bad 1.0" meme. Yes I don't doubt that watchOS 2.0 is what Apple really wanted to ship from day one but I'm using my watch every day with very few issues (outside of the known slow to launch 3rd party apps). The things I use it for I'm able to do quite easily without any confusion. Quite honestly the only real issue I've had is a Bluetooth headset not wanting to pair. Is there something I'm missing? Or are people just jumping on the "it's a bad 1.0" meme without really experiencing it themselves?
     
  2. exxxviii, Sep 9, 2015
    Last edited: Sep 9, 2015

    exxxviii macrumors 65816

    exxxviii

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    May 20, 2015
    #2
    Well, if you are honest, the watch really does not do anything well. Its strengths (to me) are that it looks good and it carries the Apple brand. And I love swapping the bands. But, step back, and it is not really that special in any way. Other smart watches that have been around for years ahead of the AW do most of what the AW does. Sure, the AW notifies on email, but I bet there were a few Andriod watches out there that did that in 2014 or 2013. Over time, I expect the AW to get good at some things, but not for another year or two.

    I ignored the first three generations of the iPhone because the software was so far behind the market. It took them until iOS 4 (IIRC) before they finally got the calendaring, mail app, and contacts management to a point that I could abandon my Blackberry-- my first iPhone was the 4. I just did not feel like waiting for the watch, but seriously, the AW has major software gaps.

    It all depends on the user's expectations. If someone was looking for a revolution, the AW will disappoint. However, for someone looking for a cool alternative to a traditional watch that will not carry the 80s calculator watch stigma, the AW is fine. Here's my personal assessment from a while ago, and for the most part my opinion has not shifted much.

    • Customizable watch faces - meh - Android has faces coming out if its ears; I love Micky, but that is the only unique face
    • Complications - meh - Again, Android, Garmin, etc., have the key complications; I like Apple's more, but Apple is not a game changer here either
    • Glances - Apple win - Glances are a way to setup your favorite apps for quick access
    • Apps - meh - Apple has more apps, and always will. But other watches were already doing apps and the core apps will likely be available on all platforms
    • Notifications - meh - These had been around a while ahead of the AW; Apple's are marginally better, but they own the phone and watch, so I expected it. And, I expect everyone else will match Apple
    • Looks -Crushing Apple victory
    • Exercise - Apple no show - Apple did not attempt to play, so it is a fail for those who expected it
    • Activity - Apple fail - lacks may core features that the rings cannot compensate for
    • Watch UI - Apple win - I prefer the AW UI to others I have seen
    • Versatility - Apple power win - in time, there will be apps for everything
    • Battery - Apple fail - weakest in the market by a long shot
    • Ruggedness - Apple no show - didn't attempt to to play
    • Water resistance - meh - perceived as weak, but not really
    • Pricing - Apple fail - I cannot rationalize the cost to anyone I know
     
  3. DavidLynch macrumors 6502a

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    Apr 9, 2015
    #3
    I haven't had any real issues. If they had delayed it until the fall to release with OS2 features people would have thrown a fit. They really needed to ease in the more battery-taxing features after seeing real-world usage results too.
     
  4. GrumpyMom macrumors 601

    GrumpyMom

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    #4
    I think it's a really smooth first gen product. It had a rough launch but it's a lot of fun now. If I didn't think so I wouldn't be so tempted to buy the new gold sport one and have two!
     
  5. sean000 macrumors 6502a

    sean000

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    Location:
    Bellingham, WA
    #5
    It's not a question of honesty, but a matter of opinion. My opinion disagrees with your statement, because I think the watch does many things quite well. I do agree that it will most certainly get better over time (or I would say "even better"), and OS2 will be a step in that direction.

    I think it depends on what you want these devices for. In my case the iPhone 3G was a step up from the Blackberry (I had both the original monochrome BB and later the color display "Blueberry"). My problem was that the Blackberry was a great device for accessing my work email, calendar and contacts. But for me that was never a killer feature. It was terrible for Web browsing, and there were no apps. I was also a Palm OS user, and I did use a lot of Palm apps for lists, project management, journaling (with a fold-up keyboard), tracking, etc. Yes there were still some kinks to work out with the iPhone 3G and iOS 3, but for me it was still an excellent product because it replaced two devices for me: My Blackberry and my Palm device. It combined the apps of the Palm ecosystem (most of my favorite apps were ported over to iOS by then) with a much better Web browsing experience than the Blackberry. While email and calendar were not up there with Blackberry (at least for enterprise email systems like Exchange and Lotus Notes), that was not a big deal for me.

    I don't know... I've been in the tech industry since the mid-1990s and I have used a lot of new technology during that time. The Apple Watch has had a more significant impact on my daily life than most technology I have adopted, but I fall into the power user category. Casual users may or may not get as much out of it, but it probably depends on what they want out of it. Even power user opinions vary by what they need and expect from the AW. For me it's pretty revolutionary... much like the Palm IIIx was or like the iPhone 3G was. Maybe not in terms of the functionality it provides. Those were both primary devices and the AW is an accessory device, but as an accessory it has absolutely revolutionized the way I get and interact with the information and communication provided by my iPhone in ways that I would say are huge improvements.

    Just goes to show how different we all are... Micky is the face I almost never use :)
    Micky is cute, but most of the time I prefer the more functional faces like Utility and Modular. In the evening and on weekends I like to switch to one of the fun faces, but I prefer the Motion faces. I guess I would rather look at jellyfish than at Micky :p

    Apps and complications are important to me, and I am really looking forward to third party complications in Watch OS2. Again I believe we can use the iPhone 3G analogy here. When the iPhone 3G came out the app store grew at a much larger pace than the app selection for Android. I think developers will also focus on the Apple Watch first. Yes Android will catch up, but personally I think it will be another year or more before I can buy an Android phone and Android watch and get all of the apps and functionality I enjoy with my iPhone and Apple Watch. That's not to say that Android watches don't do some things better (or at least in a way that some will prefer), but at this time there are no Android options that offer me some of the features I value in my Apple Watch.

    • For me the way notifications are handled was the primary reason for purchasing the Apple Watch: The haptic engine and being able to act on, postpone, snooze or dismiss notifications.
    • I agree on looks. I do find some Android watches attractive (especially newer models), but I prefer the squarish shape to round for a smartwatch.
    • On Exercise and Activity: I love the rings, but in some ways it falls short of my Fitbit as a fitness tracker. I think Apple is playing a long-game here with the Health apps ability to be a central database for various native and third-party apps, and then there is AirStrip. It's not surprising that right out of the gate they have some catching up to do since Fitbit and others have already defined the fitness tracker. I'm both cautious and curious to see where Apple (and Apple's competition) are headed in this area.
    • I do think the Activity rings are more meaningful for some people who are not as interested in the features of more powerful exercise/fitness tracking apps. While I can say my Fitbit is a better fitness tracker at this time, I find myself paying attention to completing the rings more than I check my Fitbit stats and goals.
    • Watch UI and versatility - I agree these are wins for Apple, but I like some of what I see on the Android side as well. Personally I like the squarish interface of the Apple Watch, the digital crown, etc.
    • Battery is a fail? I disagree. It is on par with my iPhone 6 and I have never run out of battery with either device even on days of heavy use. I charge both at night when I go to sleep. I don't need either device to last for days on a single charge. From what I have observed most Apple Watch owners do not think battery life is an issue at all.
    • Ruggedness and Water Resistance - After a couple of months so far so good with my AWS, but it's still an unknown which is why I bought Apple Care +
    • Pricing - Before I bought one, I thought the pricing was reasonable...of course I would prefer it to be a little lower, but I still bought a 38mm AWS. At the time of purchase I just couldn't justify spending more on the SS model. After owning the watch for two months I can totally rationalize spending more on the SS model, because the watch has been that useful to me. I will likely wear it every single day, for 15 to 18 hours a day, for several years. Even if I didn't sell it and I bought another model after two years, that comes out to about 50 cents a day to own and use a device that really does more than enough for me throughout the day to justify the 50 cents or even a dollar (which is what the SS model would break down to).

    So that's my honest opinion :p

    Sean
     
  6. exxxviii macrumors 65816

    exxxviii

    Joined:
    May 20, 2015
    #6
    My use of the term "honest" was more of a euphemism for stepping back and trying to take an objective competitive market assessment: looking at other products through the eyes of a consumer who does not have a particular brand bias. That is the case where I think that there may not be much that makes the AW special or a stand-out. Everyone else does the same stuff, and has been doing the same stuff for years. Apple just looks prettier. For most features, we can probably find at least one competitive smart watch that at least equals the AW in that feature and possibly surpasses it.

    I do not use Mickey either. I just like it.
     
  7. douglasf13 macrumors 65816

    Joined:
    Jul 2, 2010
    #7
    Yeah, I think that's really the point. While we can all argue about which is more important, form or function, form has never been as important in the tech space as it is with wearables, and Apple has a leg up on the other tech companies in that regard.
     
  8. parseckadet, Sep 10, 2015
    Last edited: Sep 10, 2015

    parseckadet macrumors 6502a

    parseckadet

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    Dec 13, 2010
    Location:
    Denver, CO
    #8
    This same situation happens every time Apple enters a new category. I distinctly remember Molly Wood crying about how the original iPhone was a total flop and didn't qualify as a "real" smartphone because it couldn't run third party apps. Running Word was the litmus test for her, and she swore the Samsung Blackjack running Windows CE was a better phone. Then the original iPad came around and people swore up and down that it was either "just a big iPhone" or an over priced, dumbed down netbook.

    Now we have Leo Laporte declaring the Apple Watch is a total flop, while in same breath acknowledging that it has outsold every other smart watch before it combined. For some people nothing Apple does is ever good enough, while they sing the praises of interior products like the Blackjack, Asus Eee PC (it's name literally is screaming to get away from the product it's attached to), and now the Moto 270 (to use John Gruber's apt nomenclature).

    To some people attaching the Apple name to any 1.0 product is all it takes to declare it a failure.

    Case in point:
    People who constantly bash Apple products always start with broad overgeneralizations like this. Really? It doesn't ANYTHING well?
    Just one sentence after saying the Apple Watch doesn't do ANYTHING well you admit that it looks good and you like swapping bands. That sounds like two things it does well to me. And for a device that straddles the line of fashion, looking good and easily swapping bands is pretty darn important.
    Wait, now you're changing the rules! You started out by saying that the Apple Watch didn't do anything WELL. Then you said it looks good, and now it sounds like you're saying it does notifications well also. But now you're saying that the real test is whether other watches did it FIRST. If we want to talk about watches that did things FIRST, I can show you a Citizen watch from 5 years ago that would move a hand every time you got a new email. And if anything, Apple proved with the iPod that just because you didn't do it FIRST doesn't mean you're automatically the loser.

    I could criticize the rest of what you said, but at this point I think that would be moot. It's just more of the same; admitting that Apple does something better when you previously said they did NOTHING well, or cherry picking features from various other devices as if they all were done by one single, magical device that doesn't really exist. No smart watch today is perfect and they all have room to improve, including the Apple Watch. But just because the Apple Watch has room for improvement, that doesn't mean it's a bad 1.0 device.
     
  9. exxxviii, Sep 10, 2015
    Last edited: Sep 10, 2015

    exxxviii macrumors 65816

    exxxviii

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    May 20, 2015
    #9
    I debated putting something like "technical features" in front of that clause to clarify it. But, I thought folks might have picked up on the technical features versus cosmetics. And, when you read further, you would see that I made a generalization that I supported with a detailed breakdown of the features.

    I did not say it is a bad 1.0 device. I said it is not that that special. Yes, it is the best looking smart watch out there for my taste. But the technical features it delivers today are not much different than existing products. In a few years, when the OS and apps mature, it should be awesome. But it is not that special in its current form.

    Owner caveat: I have an AW and a dozen bands that I swap all the time. I thoroughly enjoy my watch. But, I could live without it, and I completely understand when almost everyone else I know looks at and does not see the point.

    Rather than tell my my argument is bunk, just list five major features or functions the AW does that exceeds most or all other products in the smartwatch category. I gave you Glances, Looks, Watch UI, and Versatility in my analysis. But Glances is really just a subset of UI. And Looks really is not a technical feature. Try to be objective by not overly-apply an AW and Apple bias.
     
  10. douglasf13 macrumors 65816

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    Jul 2, 2010
    #10
    With wearables, that's the hardest part to pull off. Even with that being said, there have always been more configurable and technically capable computers, mp3 players, phones, etc., than what Apple offers. Apple is about curating a user experience with style, and it's been that way for a while. With wearables, that style is more important than ever.
     
  11. parseckadet, Sep 10, 2015
    Last edited: Sep 10, 2015

    parseckadet macrumors 6502a

    parseckadet

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    Denver, CO
    #11
    Yours was the first replay to the OP in which he brings up online discussions declaring the Apple Watch a bad 1.0 device, a position that he implied he disagreed with. In this first post your first sentence says that the Apple Watch doesn't do anything well. That sets the tone that you are taking a view that is contrary to that of the OP. Everything that followed was cast in that light.
    I'll start by saying that challenging me to do so misses the point of my original response. The Apple Watch doesn't have to be better in X number of categories in order for it to be declared not a bad 1.0 device. And who defines X anyway? Why five? Why not three or ten?

    One final point, I don't think you can lump all of Watch UI into one single category. You even started to go down that road by listing Glances a separate. That's like justifying why iPhones are better than other Android phones, but only letting iOS vs. Android count as one item. The OS and the hardware are intertwined and should be considered as a whole.

    Given these points here are my 5:
    1: Looks
    2: Versatility (I assume this covers band swapping)
    3: Fitness tracking: Let me explain. Some people care about GPS, but I don't. I live in South Texas. The heat index has been above 100 just about every day since I got my watch until last week. Even if I didn't have back problems I wouldn't be running outside in this heat. To me the most important thing is tracking activity on indoor equipment, namely ellipticals. I borrowed my wife's fit bit and it did a mediocre job, and all my research has suggested the Android watches are about the same. In comparison, the Apple Watch just seems to nail what I'm doing and is always within a few calories of what the machine itself estimates (after entering my vitals into the machine so it's accurate as well). Consumer Reports has corroborated by own experiences here.
    4: Fitness motivation: Yes, I count this separately from tracking. I do so because I feel the motivation side of the coin is just as, if not more, important than the tracking. I've owned fit bits in the past, and they never really motivated me for some reason. The Apple Watch does, largely because those rings are there every time I check the time and I am compelled to complete them. I have no idea why rings work better than progress bars, or growing flowers, or any other cutesy animation, but they do and only Apple hit on that idea. Further, they translate movement into actual calories, instead of useless step counts. Couple that with the fact that they also encourage you to not be sedentary and to exercise for 30 minutes (both of which are based on sound medical research) and they have a combination that makes perfect sense, but very few others have thought to track. Not to mention the awards you earn, though I wish they could be shared via social media more easily. The 20+ lbs I've lost since getting the watch speaks for itself.
    5: Notifications/Force Touch: I've tuned my watch into notifying me of exactly what I want and nothing else. I've done it to such a degree that certain emails play a sound and tap, while others just tap, and others don't notify me at all. And the fact that it's so easy to clear everything with a force touch is just great. Also, muting by simply covering the screen is great. Honestly, I didn't research how Android handles it and I don't really care.

    BONUS:
    6: Best integration with iPhone: I'm throwing this one in there since Android watches can now work with iPhones. But I'm committed to iPhone for various reasons, and I don't want a watch that only half integrates with it.

    Notice Glances don't make my top 6. I'm not really a fan of them, and I much prefer complications.
     
  12. Quu macrumors 68020

    Quu

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    Apr 2, 2007
    #12
    I've owned quite a few first gen Apple products and the watch was the first one I returned. I just didn't find it compelling enough as a digital consumer product. Fashion wise it's nice but there are plenty of unique watches out there that you can pick one that's even more personal to your individual style than what the Apple watch offers.

    I'm not writing the category off entirely, it's a start, I'm sure the Apple Watch 2 or 3 will entice me.
     
  13. ditzy macrumors 68000

    ditzy

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    Sep 28, 2007
    #13
    It looks prettier, that's actually really important. I wear the watch, no matter how useful the watch is I'm not going to wear an ugly watch.
    Also for something to be better than the Apple watch it has to beat it on many of the features not just one.
     
  14. sean000 macrumors 6502a

    sean000

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    #14
    The brand bias thing was one of the reasons I wanted to respond. Of course we all have our biases, and I am a long-time iOS user... but I am hardly an Apple die-hard. I almost went Android earlier this year. I use Windows (and a Chromebook) at home and at work. I have owned only one Mac over the years (a Macbook). I really liked that Macbook, but I went back to Windows because that's what my employer offered to purchase for me. While I have been an iOS user since the iPhone 3G, I seriously considered going from the iPhone 5 to an Android phone instead of the iPhone 6. Not that I wasn't happy with iOS, but I use a lot of Google services on my iPhone and I was curious to see what the experience would be like on Android. I was already a bit familiar with the Android interface because my staff need to support both iOS and Android (among many other things). I was pretty sure I preferred iOS, but knew I'd probably get used to Android as well.

    So what made me stay with iOS? Mostly the Apple Watch. From what I read and observed I knew the Apple Watch + iPhone would be better integrated, and that there would be more apps for the Apple Watch. Yes for most features you can probably find at least one competitive smart watch (or fitness tracker) that is as good or better. That's fine as long as you can find another watch that provides all of the features you care about (in addition to something you think looks good on you). For me the Apple Watch was simply the only device (and still is) that provides all of the features and functionality I want. I don't think it's correct to say that they all do the same stuff. The Apple Watch definitely does some things Android watches can't do yet. That will change...at least with Android watches + Android phones. I think iPhone users will always need to choose between an Apple Watch and a third party option that is a bit more limited in how well it integrates with the iPhone. Some will be fine with a limited set of features and others won't.

    Of course I am an odd duck because I was shopping for a smartwatch more than a new smart phone. For me the watch really is the device I use all day long, and my iPhone only comes out a few times a day. Most people buy the phone they want, and then worry about the wearable accessories. Will the Apple Watch inspire consumers to switch from Android to iOS in the future? Maybe a few, but there will also be iPhone users who buy Android, Pebble or Fitbit wearables. Some of them might even switch to Android phones to get more functionality with their favorite watch. Most probably won't care and won't buy anything more than a $100 fitness tracker for whatever phone they use.

    Sean
     
  15. papbot macrumors 6502

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    May 19, 2015
    #15
    I think that may be the most lucid, articulate and accurate review of the watch on this whole site. I actually agree with every point you made. To me the watch has been a total success and does every thing I envisioned it doing when first announced, and why I and my wife bought ours.
     
  16. Zirel Suspended

    Zirel

    Joined:
    Jul 24, 2015
    #16
    Seriously, you should get a another smartwatch and be forced to use it.

    Meh...

    Complications you have on competitors...

    But you don't get to have your favorite face AND your choice of complications. You get EITHER.

    For exercise, the Apple Watch a "no show", it's "only" the best smartwatch out there, by far... if you want to be fooled by the competition (except the Mio, which is a sportswatch, not a smartwatch) then go away, with your toy with zero accuracy and zero reliability, if you want to wear an incomodative strap, that stinks, go away...

    Bettery?

    Are judging by apple's conservative figures? Compared to BS figures (as always) with other manufacturers?

    Meh...

    Your taste is poor... and if your standards are low, don't care about apple products.
     
  17. Rogifan thread starter macrumors P6

    Rogifan

    Joined:
    Nov 14, 2011
    #17
    I guess for what I use my watch for it works well so I don't think a lot about shortcomings or how it compares to other devices. I just use the damn thing. And for the majority of things I use it for it works just fine.
     
  18. exxxviii macrumors 65816

    exxxviii

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    May 20, 2015
    #18
    I like my watch and it does most of what I want pretty well also. I am just a bit disappointed in its immature activity tracking offering, but I mostly got over it.

    But here is a reality check-- most of us are part of a group of millions of people who bought the watch sight-unseen, based on just a keynote presentation, marketing materials, and a brand promise. Mass purchase events like that rarely occur outside of Apple stuff. The rest of the consumer universe may not be thinking like us. They may also be considering the watch for its technical merits against other competitive offerings.
     
  19. douglasf13 macrumors 65816

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    #19
    I really think this is different, though. There have always been more feature rich options to whatever Apple is offering, and people still buy Apple products. Now that we have a products meant to be worn, "kinda" caring about what a tech product looks like turns into really caring, and that's where Apple has a big advantage.

    The paradox of choice is everywhere in the tech space, and much of Apple's success is based on being a curator of tech for people that don't want to fuss with it. The same can be said of fashion houses who tell us what's in style. Now that wearables are upon us, Apple's history of design excellence is a big advantage in their corner.
     
  20. HippieMagic macrumors 6502

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    Dec 21, 2011
    #20
    Honestly, I like my watch (38mm SS ML), but I don't know if I would buy it again. I think it looks great and it does make some things slightly more convenient, but at the same time it doesn't exactly do anything major that I feel I have to have. I like using Apple Pay with it. It's cool to have that ability. I like checking texts really quick to see if I need to respond with it. I just don't know that I NEED those functions or that I would really miss them if they were gone.

    I am very on the fence as to whether or not I will end up with another in the future. Not really all that convinced that smart watches in general are really a big deal. Nice to have but not so nice you need them at this point.
     

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