Do I need a UPS for 6-core Mac Pro

Discussion in 'Mac Pro' started by lbeck, Sep 27, 2010.

  1. lbeck macrumors 6502

    lbeck

    Joined:
    Dec 5, 2009
    #1
    My new 6- core mac pro will be here at the end of the week. I'm wondering if I really need a UPS for it. I've had iMac's for the past 5 years and have always had them plugged into a surge protector which has worked when an outage has happened. No damage has ever been done to my iMac or its internal hardware.

    How important is it to have a UPS for a mac pro? What can happen if I dont get one? Will a surge protector do the job by itself?
     
  2. Honumaui macrumors 6502a

    Joined:
    Apr 18, 2008
    #2
    most cheap surge suppressors dont work ?
    so even though power went out chances are nothing would have happened anyway ?

    a UPS is nice cause if you are working it allows you to shut it down nicely :) or tell it to shut down without you their ?

    are they needed ? no but its nice to have

    big thread on them in the last few days ? good reading with lots of info to answer everything I bet ;)
     
  3. SnoFlo macrumors regular

    SnoFlo

    Joined:
    Feb 5, 2010
    #3
    You most definitely need a UPS. Run and buy one.
     
  4. 2contagious macrumors 6502a

    2contagious

    Joined:
    Apr 29, 2008
    Location:
    UK
    #4
    I didn't bother getting a UPS, as I don't want to spend that kind of money (prices are ridiculous here in the UK) and I don't really need backup power, as we never really have power outages here in London. I am using an "APC Line R Power Conditioner". It's basically a UPS without the battery/backup power (protects against surges and brownouts).
     
  5. lbeck thread starter macrumors 6502

    lbeck

    Joined:
    Dec 5, 2009
    #5
    Please explain why you think I must run out and buy one. Looking for reasons that will make it worth it. I back up regularly so losing a hard drive is not that big of a deal to me.
     
  6. CaptainChunk macrumors 68020

    CaptainChunk

    Joined:
    Apr 16, 2008
    Location:
    Phoenix, AZ
    #6
    It really depends on how mission-critical your work is.

    A good UPS allows you to safely shut down the machine in the event of a power outage and prevent possible data loss. As a film editor, I run one. I've never had to resort to using UPS battery power for a safe shut-down, but it's good to have that peace of mind.

    When shopping for a UPS, also realize that not all UPS units are created equal. Double-conversion/online type UPS units are the best types, but the most expensive. If an online type is out of your budget, look at a line-interactive model as a bare minimum. I would avoid cheap offline/standby types because they don't stand up very well to brownouts and generally lack the battery capacity to keep a typical workstation properly powered, making them not much better than a normal surge suppressor.

    You can read more about different types of UPS systems here.

    APC and Tripplite are both good UPS manufacturers.
     
  7. lbeck thread starter macrumors 6502

    lbeck

    Joined:
    Dec 5, 2009
    #7
    Thanks Captain Chucl! Anyone else have a take?
     
  8. fensterbme macrumors member

    Joined:
    Jul 27, 2010
    Location:
    Columbus, OH
    #8
    +1 Get a UPS

    Just because you haven't had a problem in the past doesn't mean you won't have one in the future.

    Yeah the good one's aren't cheap, and yeah they don't make your computer go any faster... but man they are nice to have. I don't ever want to have my power go out and have me not be able to save a file I've been working on, additionally since I have some striped disks(RAID) going on I don't ever want my machine to get dropped cold. Could I recover from backup, yes.. would I like to do that, absolutely not. I don't want to have to rebuild my machine or reload data, that takes time I don't have... and there is always the outside risk that some part of your backup won't work.

    In the end it's about how important your data is, and how important your time is... I think it should be safe to assume that if your getting a Mac Pro you had a reason and that things are important, if so get the UPS.

    Sadly just yesterday my APC Smart-UPS 1400 just had it's battery fail, oh bother... I'm still quite happy with the unit and these batteries have been going strong for almost five years.
     
  9. lbeck thread starter macrumors 6502

    lbeck

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    Dec 5, 2009
  10. nanofrog macrumors G4

    Joined:
    May 6, 2008
    #10
    To me, this is the absolute bare minimum. And anyone that buys one needs to pay attention to the surge suppresion values, as most UPS's (even the Online units), are short in this area (i.e. less than 500 Joules, when you should run 3k+ Joules). Seriously.

    You can add a good surge suppressor between the wall and UPS (or auto transformer, which is what the Line R Power Conditioner really is). I realize the prices in the UK are terrible, but how valuable is your sytem to you?

    It all comes down to how well a user understands the risks involved for their situation in order to answer this question. I'm accustomed to being able to get a sufficient UPS system for 10 - 15% of the system cost (usually refurbished in order to get a better unit that's better suited to protect the equipment), so that's like the cost of an acceptably priced extended warranty. Though I'm not as familiar with UK pricing, I know both the system and UPS are more expensive there, so the percentages may not be off that much.

    Granted this is still more money (budgets tend not to be unlimited in the vast majority of cases), but is it ultimately worth it if your system (and potentially data, as such a failure can take out the backups as well) gets damaged or destroyed due to a power system fault?

    BTW, the brownout protection offered by the Online type UPS's is better than an auto tranformer or Line Interactive UPS (also uses an auto transformer) can provide, as the Online units always runs off of the batteries + inverter (no output voltage variations that occur with switched taps on a transformer) to produce the output voltage without any transients passing through to the system (i.e. noise from switching or any EMI/RFI that may get past/picked up after the filters).

    Yes, it's expensive, but it comes down to how valuable the system and data is to the user (sucks to have $5000USD in hardware blow because of inadequate protection, and the data may be price-less).

    Just something to consider in the future, and may help others. ;)

    BTW, Eaton makes good products, and more common in the UK as I understand it. Not sure about Tripp Lite's availability, though I know they make units for the UK.

    Absolutely. :)

    So is Eaton. I'm less sure about Cyberpower's products though, as I've never had access to thier better units (not all that common yet from what I've seen).
     
  11. johnnymg macrumors 65816

    johnnymg

    Joined:
    Nov 16, 2008
    #11
    FWIW: CP AVR 1500 specs:
    Surge Protection and Filtering
    Surge Suppression 1,500 Joules
    Maximum Surge Current 36,000 Amps
     
  12. 3282868 macrumors 603

    Joined:
    Jan 8, 2009
    #12
    I've got an APC XS 1500 for my 2008 8-core Mac Pro. Seems to be doing a good job, was about $150USD. Any thoughts on it?
     
  13. Icaras macrumors 603

    Icaras

    Joined:
    Mar 18, 2008
    Location:
    California, United States
    #13
    By the way, I just received my CP 1500 unit today. Very happy so far. :)

    I see what you mean. This thing doesn't make even a peep in sound! I'm very impressed.

    Anyway, I shall try and chime in later with more about it if I have some more time...
     
  14. johnnymg macrumors 65816

    johnnymg

    Joined:
    Nov 16, 2008
    #14
    Unplug that baby from the wall and let us know how if your MP makes a peep.

    cheers and congrats
    JohnG
     
  15. Icaras macrumors 603

    Icaras

    Joined:
    Mar 18, 2008
    Location:
    California, United States
    #15
    Oh, you mean a buzzing sound that some users have reported? Yea, I'll definitely post results when i get a chance.
     
  16. nanofrog macrumors G4

    Joined:
    May 6, 2008
    #16
    Some do have more, even APC's products (i.e. units aimed at the Home Theater market). But the SMT1500 for example, only has 459 Joules. Similar models from Tripp Lite and others usually have similar ratings.

    EDIT: Found the unit I was thinking of: APC J15 (4500 Joules). Much better than the units aimed at computers anyway, including the Online types (SURTA1500XL is only rated for 540 J). :rolleyes: :p

    As per Cyber Power, I'm still nervous of their products, as I've not had the ability to use them personally (no track record). They seem to be newer to the market, and the consumer units don't look that great to me compared to other known brands (APC, Tripp Lite, and Eaton), so I do make some correlation as to what to expect.

    It's a consumer unit that uses a stepped sine output from the inverter.

    Pull the plug and see how it functions with your system, as it runs off of the wall when there's power above the switching voltage (typically ~90VAC).
     
  17. leftPCbehind209 macrumors member

    Joined:
    Aug 23, 2010
    #17
  18. nanofrog macrumors G4

    Joined:
    May 6, 2008
    #18
    The S versions are pure sine wave output, while the J series are stepped outputs (when running off of the battery + inverter).

    As the VA rating is lower, so is the suppression spec (S10 = 3060 J), but is still a better unit than the SMT1000 (459 J). Both pure sine outputs off of the inverters, but there's quite a difference in the suppression spec.

    1000VA Models:

    1500VA Models:

    BTW, $200 for an S10 is an exceptionally low price, as other places seem to be selling the S10 for $600 (even Vann's wants that for the black version). It may be a typo, and not honored. One seller on Amazon has it for $425 + shipping (88% positive rating). Cheapest the S15 is $676 (no idea on the reputation of the site).

    The J versions will be cheaper, but there's reason for it (~$400 and $550 respectively). :rolleyes: ;)
     
  19. leftPCbehind209 macrumors member

    Joined:
    Aug 23, 2010
    #19
    Your response seemed to be in a different language :D

    Are you saying that the one I linked is a good one, especially if it's at that price?
     
  20. SnoFlo macrumors regular

    SnoFlo

    Joined:
    Feb 5, 2010
    #20
    Sorry I was unable to elaborate further, lbeck, but from what I've read above and elsewhere, well, I can't add to the wisdom! Anyway, I was like you once with just a Tripp Lite voltage regulator. I was backing up one day and the power went out. Data was corrupted on both the main and backup hard drives afterwards. Lesson learned.
     
  21. nanofrog macrumors G4

    Joined:
    May 6, 2008
    #21
    It looks to be a good unit (think SUA1500 or SMT1500 with additional surge suppression). So if they'll actually honor that price, get it.

    I would check out the seller first on resellerratings.com and/or other sources to be sure they're not unreliable (best to be safe before spending any money).
     
  22. Vylen macrumors 65816

    Joined:
    Jun 3, 2010
    Location:
    Sydney, Australia
    #22
    To hijack this thread a bit, what do people think about the CyberPower Value 2200?

    It's a "Simulated Sine Wave at 230Vac +/- 10%" instead of pure - is that bad or not?

    I've seen some people with a CyberPower and have had no complaints. And read about people saying "simulated is bad" but with no particular reason or backing/proof for the claim.

    Cause where I live at the moment, whilst blackouts are extremely rare, they aren't really blackouts - more like a second long power outage (while prolonged blackouts are even rarer). Just long enough for electronics to shut down and turn back on. So a simulated sine wave shouldn't (?) make a difference in this situation.
     
  23. sporadic macrumors newbie

    Joined:
    Jun 9, 2009
    Location:
    Southampton, UK.
    #23
    Interesting read here regarding the different UPS approaches.
     
  24. lbeck thread starter macrumors 6502

    lbeck

    Joined:
    Dec 5, 2009
    #24
    Great info ... keep it coming. To make it easier, anyone who has a UPS for their MacPro and loves its performace, feel free to post a link to it where it can be bought.

    I'll be possibly be getting one for a new 6-core Mac Pro, running a 27" ACD. Any recommendations?
     
  25. psychometry macrumors regular

    Joined:
    Oct 5, 2006
    #25
    I'm Ron Burgundy?
     

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