Do I need the family version??

Discussion in 'Mac Apps and Mac App Store' started by benalexe, Aug 8, 2007.

  1. benalexe macrumors member

    Joined:
    Oct 7, 2006
    #1
    If I have 2 machines, do I need to buy the family version? Is there a difference with the physical disc or just the paper license?
     
  2. scotthayes, Aug 8, 2007
    Last edited by a moderator: Nov 20, 2010

    scotthayes macrumors 68000

    scotthayes

    Joined:
    Jun 6, 2007
    Location:
    Birmingham, England
    #2
    Family version gives you 5 licences, allowing it to be installed on 5 machines in the same household.

    so two machines needs family version, and you can the go buy three new iMacs and install it on them too :)


    We've got 3 macs (mini, MacBook Pro and MacBook) so bought family version.
     
  3. sananda macrumors 68020

    Joined:
    May 24, 2007
    #3
    i called them saying i am a single user with an imac and ibook and they confirmed that there is no exception for desktop and laptop; i must buy the family pack. pity because i can get a really good price on the single user version of life08 through the higher education store but no reduction on the family pack.
     
  4. coren2000 macrumors member

    Joined:
    May 16, 2007
    #4
    Read the Licence

    From: http://images.apple.com/legal/sla/docs/iwork.pdf

    "2. Permitted License Uses and Restrictions.
    A. iWork Single User License. This License allows you to install and use one copy of the Apple Software (whether trial or full version) on a
    single Apple-labeled computer at a time. This License does not allow the Apple Software to exist on more than one computer at a time, and you
    may not make the Apple Software available over a network where it could be used by multiple computers at the same time. You may make one
    copy of the Apple Software in machine-readable form for backup purposes only; provided that the backup copy must include all copyright or
    other proprietary notices contained on the original."

    Now, I am not a lawyer, but neither is a software licence a binding contract. (the legality of a software licence is a totally separate discussion)

    I read the above quote as "you can only use the single user licence on one computer at a time"

    Highlights of my thinking
    install and use one copy - AND USE being keywords here (ie install anywhere you want, but only run one copy at a time)
    This License does not allow the Apple Software to exist on more than one computer at a time - EXIST being keywords here (ie loaded into memory and running). Until a piece of software is loaded into memory, it is just 0s, 1s, and Metadata. It only exists when it is running.

    Since you are a single user I believe it is fair to allow you to use your software anywhere you want, so long as it is only YOU running it. YOU are not a family, and should not have to buy a family pack.

    If you wish to challenge my thoughts based on legality, fine. However then you open up the whole "is a EULA legally binding" issue.
     
  5. coren2000 macrumors member

    Joined:
    May 16, 2007
    #5
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Software_license_agreement

    Pay special attention to the Enforcability section where it talks about contracts of adhesion and unconscionable.

    All of this is really moot since Apple will not sue you, its a complete waste of time for them and would open up a LOT of bad publicity. I take it that your real intent for asking your question is gauging your moral obligations towards this software licence agreement. So long as you run the software as a "single user" (ie its just you using the software, and only on one machine at a time) you are upholding the ideal of the contract and are therefore not morally defunct.
     
  6. sananda macrumors 68020

    Joined:
    May 24, 2007
    #6
    i am a lawyer and i disagree with you.
     
  7. stealthsniper96 macrumors regular

    Joined:
    Jul 20, 2007
    #7
    well to all you who have the family pack with some left over- care to let me have one of the liscences?
     
  8. coren2000 macrumors member

    Joined:
    May 16, 2007
    #8
    You would have to live in the same home as them :p

    Even though I have a lawyer disagreeing with me, I am quite sure you can form a legal defense if you are ever sued by apple so long as you do not share your single user licence.

    However Apple would be moronic to sue you (oh no sharing with yourself!!! gasp what a crime).

    The question you have to ask yourself is "am I stealing?" so long as you dont take what isn't yours, you arn't IMHO.
     

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